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2007, LIMITED. on the dash there is two 12 volt outlets. one by the driver, the other by the passenger. the driver side is with the key ( ignition on, outlet hot(working) ). the passenger side is always hot ( charging cell phones, etc).

now, my wife rides passenger, and uses the hot side to plug in the charger for her cell phone. the phone gets barely any charge, but the phone shows it is receiving juice from the outlet. got her a new phone, ( she was due), and also she bought a 1.5 amp charger , as we both thought that it was her old charger was not supply enough juice.

She was at 98% and she wanted to see how well the charger worked, and if it would bring her phone up to 100% during the 45 minute drive. The phone showed the RED led, stating it was receiving juice, plus the little battery icon also showed it was receiving juice. when we arrived, it was at 99%, but yet when we use the home charger ( 120 v ) it will take it 100% likety split.

so, could some please enlighten me on this, that has more electronic knowledge than me.

Hope every one had a good Thanksgiving.

John B.
 

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Try it in the other plug on the drivers side. I bet you get the same result. Plug something else into the plugs like a flood light or something and compare the 2 outlets. But if it is only the one on the right - see if it needs cleaning - make sure to either disconnect the battery neg. side or pull the fuse. Do not clean it with power on it. The wire leading to that plug might have a bad connection - but not my first choice.
 

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This has more to do with the charger, cable, or phone than it does with the Jeep.

Your battery gauge is lying to you (and it's not such a bad thing)
http://forum.xda-developers.com/showthread.php?t=871051

Interestingly enough, improvements in battery management technology have compounded the average user's perception of this problem. Older phones were rather inelegant in their charging behavior; usually filling the battery to capacity and then switching to a trickle current to maintain the highest charge possible. This offered the highest usage time in the short-term, but was damaging the battery over the course of ownership. As explained at Battery University, "The time at which the battery stays at [maximum charge] should be as short as possible. Prolonged high voltage promotes corrosion, especially at elevated temperatures."[1]

This is why many new phones will "lose" up to 10% within a few minutes of coming off the charger. The reality is that the battery was only at 100% capacity for a brief moment, after which the battery management system allowed it to slowly dip down to around 90%. Leaving the phone plugged in overnight does not make a difference: the phone only uses the wall current to maintain a partial charge state.
The phone manufacturers essentially have three choices:
1. Use older charging styles which actually maintain a full battery, thereby decreasing its eventual life
2. Use new charging methods and have an accurate battery gauge
3. Use new charging methods and have the inaccurate battery gauge

Option one has clearly fallen out of favor as it prematurely wears devices. Option two, while being honest, would most likely be met with many complaints. After all, how many people want to see their phone draining down to 90% while it is still plugged in? Option three therefore offers an odd compromise. Maybe phone companies think that users will be less likely to worry about a quick drop off the charger than they will worry about a "defective" charger that doesn't keep their phone at 100% while plugged in.
tl/dr"
In short that is normal operation for new phones with smarter battery management technology.
 

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Phone chargers can be the devil

As an aside, I got one of the USB cord chargers that go in the power outlet.
An older smart phone charged, but a newer smart phone tagged it as an unknown device, and refused to charge.
 

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As an aside, I got one of the USB cord chargers that go in the power outlet.
An older smart phone charged, but a newer smart phone tagged it as an unknown device, and refused to charge.
That has to do with your charger and phone. Has nothing to do with the vehicle.
 

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As an aside, I got one of the USB cord chargers that go in the power outlet.
An older smart phone charged, but a newer smart phone tagged it as an unknown device, and refused to charge.
That's the phone. The manufacturer for good and bad reasons wants you to only use their official chargers, so they come up with a scheme that the phone checks the charger you plug it into and won't charge if it doesn't pass the test.

Usually they use one of the data cables on the usb cord, set it to a certain voltage. So all official chargers of that brand will put out a certain voltage on the data cable, and the phone looks for it before it will charge. If its NOT there, then it must be a cheap non-brand charger (that might hurt the phone) and the phone refuses to let it charge. And that forces you to buy a Charger from that manufacturer (that may or may NOT be any better quality than the one you own already).
 
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