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I have installed one on my Commander.

I used Autometer Electric Gauges (Superior in Performance and Apperance) but cost a little more and most likely you will have to mail order it. Do a search for the thread I posted when I installed it.

I bought the little block that you can use to splice it into the trans cooler lines and install the sensor in the trans cooler lines. I ended up going with installing the sensor in the pan, since there really wasn't a lot of room to work with the lines. You'll need a bolt in bung with a seal to install the sensor. Just drill a hole in the pan, in a spot that there is room for the sensor when the pan is installed, install the sensor and reinstall the pan. On my NAG one, the seal on the bung didn't provide a good ground to the sensor, so I had to attach a wire to the ground side of the sensor and run it to a bolt for the pan to get the good ground.
 

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HeuyPilotVN's and mine perfectly compliment each other. I have the NAG1 Trans (w/ the V6), he has the 545RE trans (w/ the V8's), I used analog needle gauges, he used digital gauges, I used gauge cups to mount the gauges, he used a gauge pod. So going through both threads you'll get a good idea of the options and what you like best.

Funny, I was a CH-53E pilot in the Gulf Wars.
 

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HeuyPilotVN's and mine perfectly compliment each other. I have the NAG1 Trans (w/ the V6), he has the 545RE trans (w/ the V8's), I used analog needle gauges, he used digital gauges, I used gauge cups to mount the gauges, he used a gauge pod. So going through both threads you'll get a good idea of the options and what you like best.

Funny, I was a CH-53E pilot in the Gulf Wars.
Hats off to another Rotorhead
 

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Might explain why we just don't feel comfortable unless we can monitor our transmissions.... lol ;-)
There is more truth to that statement than many would realize. A transmission is much more important than an engine in a helicopter. You can autorotate without an engine. with a failed transmission you turn into a brick.

I had my life saved by a CW4 named Pacho Swarez when he spotted a fluctuation in the transmission guage on downwind at Vihn Long. He sat it down immeadiately on the road outside the base and the rotors turned very few times after landing.

I had not thought about that day for many years.
 

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Yep, the rotor system is the most critical, BUT, the rotors are pretty simple and very reliable. Then its the transmission, while fairly reliable still has enough things that can go wrong that it is a worry, that fails, you die in a helicopter. The smart pilots monitor those trans gauges, any indication something is wrong, it time to land, the trans starts making noise you start head down and look for a place to land on the way down.

Marines have to do a lot flying over water (Amphibious Force) and that was the big fear, 50 miles from land and trans starts to malfunction?

For the non Rotor Heads, guess how you get out of a helicopter if you have to crash land in the water? Jump out and swim away, as the sinking helicopters turning rotors come down on your head? Nope, you have to stay strapped in as the helicopter sinks, once the entire helicopter sinks underwater, the resistance of the water will stop the rotors, you can then unstrap and climb out of the sinking helicopter underwater and then swim to the surface. Imagine doing that at night?

Navy and Marine Helicopter Crews have little emergency scuba bottles in their survival vests for this scenario. You get stuck in the helicopter and can't get out right away, it sinks too deep, etc, you can pull out the bottle and have 5 min more air.
 
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