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I just installed my AFE cold air intake. It has been perfect so far. I can tell a slight power increase. The quality of the product also seemed good.
 

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I beleive that the sensor there is the MAF sensor (mass air flow sensor). The actual throttle body is behind the "air box". To answer the question, no, the k&n intake does not, it has a pipe going straight to the throttle body.
 

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Here is a K&N CAI on a 4.7

 

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I remember that it fits in a fitting in the tube and you have to make sure that it is turned to be in the proper position for air to flow past it, I think I also remember that it was a little hard to slide into the fitting.
 

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I remember that it fits in a fitting in the tube and you have to make sure that it is turned to be in the proper position for air to flow past it, I think I also remember that it was a little hard to slide into the fitting.


Yeah, you first install a rubber ring, and then the sensor in it, and yes, it is a bit hard to get it in there, also, there is a hose that has to be cut, I think it was about 5".

I have the K&N and I like it, I also think that the intake seems to be more of a straight shot. Also, the K&N does not have a encloser box, but a pre-filter takes care of that.
 

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What is the purpose of the "airbox"? I noticed the AFE system utilizes the airbox while the K&N system doesn't. The K&N CAI runs close to $100 more than the AFE and I can't justify spending the extra $$$ for the K&N name.

Thanks,

John
 

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What is the purpose of the "airbox"? I noticed the AFE system utilizes the airbox while the K&N system doesn't. The K&N CAI runs close to $100 more than the AFE and I can't justify spending the extra $$$ for the K&N name.

Thanks,

John
The box is to help the intake from sucking in the hot air in the engine compartment.
 

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It looks both CAIs block off the air filter so it can pull in the coldest air possible. I'm talking about the box to the right of the intake tube (has "4.7" on it in the pic below):



The K&N looks like tubes directly into the throttle body (in the pic below):



I wasn't sure what that box does. K&N seemed to eliminate it when AFE just tubed into it.
 

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Make sure you are comparing like motors in your pics, Both CAIs remove the factory equipment and add a box around the filter to assist in blocking out warm air.
 

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while my experience is with the LX Dodge/ Chrysler cars, considering the HEMI and the 3.5 are the same engine, the results should be linear.

#1. After extensive dyno tests, only 2 CAI systems on the market ever made power
#2. Measured mpg only increased on the HEMI and we assumed this was telling us the the HEMI's need for air was greater than the stock designed allowed
#3. Other tests were done to see if hot air in the engine, in fact, made any difference at all. Multiple temp probes were used and these were the findings: As the car sat in idle, the IAT rose and negated power increases. As the car reached speed, the addition of ambient air negated the mass of hot air and the AIT went down. Therefore we deducted that the idea of a completely schrouded CAI was a myth because the end result was the same; you only needed the power while you were moving and when you were moving the temps equaled out.
#4. The majority of the systems on the market have a filter that is too small for the HEMI and why we suppose little to no gain was made on the dyno. The bigger the filter, the bigger the increase in power (with points of deminished returns). Many of the systems also lacked a true 3"+ point somewhere in their design. THerefore the CAI which was suppose to increase air was actaully SMALLER in some point than the throttle body is was suppose to feed.
#5. In the car world the BEST performing for the LEAST amount of money is / was the AFEII

(hope this somehow helps those in the market to buy a CAI)
 

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p.s.

If you do your own dyno tests, please remember that the seal-box CAI designs work better ONLY on a dyno. As the car actually sits still the under-hood temps rise at a greater rate than those experienced during a drive.

To run a true dyno-test when comparing CAI-designs, you have to leave the hood open................no one can duplicate the amount of air the car sees while driving with typical dyno fans.

Our test methods were found sound when at the track, the results mirrored our test findings...................we were not as conserned with times as much as MPH..........a truer test of power.
 

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while my experience is with the LX Dodge/ Chrysler cars, considering the HEMI and the 3.5 are the same engine, the results should be linear.

#1. After extensive dyno tests, only 2 CAI systems on the market ever made power
...
#5. In the car world the BEST performing for the LEAST amount of money is / was the AFEII

(hope this somehow helps those in the market to buy a CAI)
Assuming that the AFEII added power, which was the other? Do you know how much they added?
 

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It looks both CAIs block off the air filter so it can pull in the coldest air possible. I'm talking about the box to the right of the intake tube (has "4.7" on it in the pic below):



The K&N looks like tubes directly into the throttle body (in the pic below):



I wasn't sure what that box does. K&N seemed to eliminate it when AFE just tubed into it.
The box that says 4.7 on it is a heimholtz chamber.
Think of it as a muffler in reverse.
Its purpose is to further quiet the intake roar, using opposing sound waves.
The systems that eliminate it often make a bit more power at the top of the R.P.M. range.

............Rob
 
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