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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I stopped by Mighty Taco this afternoon for lunch and noticed this on a 2 door JK Rubicon. As you can see from the pictures there is approximately a 1/2 inch gap between the actual beadlock ring and the tire. Im not even sure how they mounted the tire on the wheel because it doesnt even look like the beadlock ring was holding the tire in place. Is this even safe???

Also when I stood next to the tire and looked down, the wheel actually appears to stick out just as far as the tire. I sure hope this is a mall crawler as Id hate to see an amazing set of wheels get damaged.

The tires are stock 255/75R17 BFGoodrich Mud Terrains mounted on 17x8.5 AEV Pintler wheels



 

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I don't know if the wheel is actually locking the bead in. I think it may be mounted normally with the lock ring bolted on. I think lock ring is just there for looks although it could probably be used for an actual bead lock if the tire were mounted differently.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Is it even possible to mount a tire on a beadlock wheel the same way as you would mount a tire on a normal wheel? If so, wouldnt that defeat the purpose of buying the beadlock wheel to begin with? I know the AEV Pintler Beadlock wheels are street legal as they are DOT approved so I dont think they would do it like that for legal purposes. I just dont understand why someone would do that???????????
 

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Is it even possible to mount a tire on a beadlock wheel the same way as you would mount a tire on a normal wheel? If so, wouldnt that defeat the purpose of buying the beadlock wheel to begin with? I know the AEV Pintler Beadlock wheels are street legal as they are DOT approved so I dont think they would do it like that for legal purposes. I just dont understand why someone would do that???????????
Most the DOT bead locks aren't actual beadlocks per say and are more for looks, which those appear to be.
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)

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Discussion Starter #6
I have done a lot of research on these wheels as I plan on buying a set in the future. In the most recent Petersen's 4Wheel & Off-Road magazine they are shown on page 36 with a bunch of other beadlock wheels. It states that they use Hutchinson technology and are DOT-compliant.

I am sure that you have heard of Hutchinson Beadlock Wheels before.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
How much did the beak lock stick up above the rim flange? Doesn't look like much.
Im not sure exactly how much the beadlock sticks up above the wheel flange. However I do know that its enough to properly secure the bead of the tire.
 

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By the way, I'm not sure if you realize this or not, but you mount tires the same way on real beadlock wheels as you do regular wheels. There's still a bead to seal the tire/wheel. The beadlock ring is bolted into place AFTER the tire is mounted to the wheel. If someone ever tried to mount a tire with the beadlock in place, he'd mostly like rip the tire. It makes sense if you think about it--the whole purpose of the beadlock is to keep an underinflated tire from coming off the wheel. So the reverse is also true, as it would be nearly impossible to put a tire on a wheel with the beadlock ring in place.
 

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Discussion Starter #12 (Edited)

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Discussion Starter #13
If that guy deflated his tires for offroad use, the beadlocks would be able to do their job. In other words, the beadlock isn't really needed for on-road use, so the gap doesn't pose any issues.
By the way, I'm not sure if you realize this or not, but you mount tires the same way on real beadlock wheels as you do regular wheels. There's still a bead to seal the tire/wheel. The beadlock ring is bolted into place AFTER the tire is mounted to the wheel. If someone ever tried to mount a tire with the beadlock in place, he'd mostly like rip the tire. It makes sense if you think about it--the whole purpose of the beadlock is to keep an underinflated tire from coming off the wheel. So the reverse is also true, as it would be nearly impossible to put a tire on a wheel with the beadlock ring in place.

I realize you dont keep the beadlock ring in place when you mount the tire and that it bolts on AFTER the tire is mounted. However im still confused as to how he has a 1/2 inch gap in between his locking ring and tire. The way you are explaining it is once the tire is mounted the ring bolts on an holds the bead from breaking when it is aired down. Then why is there a 1/2 inch gap between the beadlock ring and tire.
 

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The beadlocks don't really do anything when the tire if fully inflated. When the tire is delfated, it obviously expands and the beadlock ring will keep the tire from coming off the wheel. That guy's set-up looks like it would work fine to me.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
The beadlocks don't really do anything when the tire if fully inflated. When the tire is delfated, it obviously expands and the beadlock ring will keep the tire from coming off the wheel. That guy's set-up looks like it would work fine to me.
I think you are wrong and dont understand how a beadlock wheel works. Your trying to tell me that when this guy deflates his tire that its going to expand that 1/2 inch and the beadlock ring is going to keep it from coming off the wheel. Ummmm no. Thats not how it works. Reguardless if the tire has 10 psi or 40 psi the actual ring bolts snug and holds the bead of the tire. If you look at the pictures posted on the first page you will see what it should look like when its mounted using the beadlock ring. If you look at the second picture where you can see the guys finger, thats where the bead of the tire is supposed to lay and when you mount the beadlock ring it locks the bead into place. The guy I saw today looks as if he has his tires mounted on the opposite side of the wheel flange.



 

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Adamag25 - I agree. It looks as though the outside bead of his tire was run to the inside of the inner bead-lock "flange", treating it as a normal wheel. The knurling on the inside of the lock ring is supposed to grip the outside of the tire bead, and the inside of the tire bead should simply be resting on the outside of the wheel flange (where the guy's finger is resting). Then it would allow the bead of the tire to truly be clamped with the ring, as is the whole purpose of a bead-lock rim. Is it possible AEV gives you the choice to mount a tire both ways if someone wants the beadlock look but doesn't want to actually clamp their tires down?
 

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Adamag25 - I agree. It looks as though the outside bead of his tire was run to the inside of the inner bead-lock "flange", treating it as a normal wheel. The knurling on the inside of the lock ring is supposed to grip the outside of the tire bead, and the inside of the tire bead should simply be resting on the outside of the wheel flange (where the guy's finger is resting). Then it would allow the bead of the tire to truly be clamped with the ring, as is the whole purpose of a bead-lock rim. Is it possible AEV gives you the choice to mount a tire both ways if someone wants the beadlock look but doesn't want to actually clamp their tires down?
Exactly.

I emailed AEV earlier, just waiting for their response.

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No bashing please, we are all here to learn from each other and we all post information from time to time that others may disagree with or which might be incorrect but that is how we learn.
 

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What I'm saying is that when he lowers the air pressure in his tires, the tread area expands. This expansion of the tire (think wider) wants to pull the bead area off the rim. The beadlock ring makes it so that the tire cannot slip off the rim, even if the bead is broken. Also, I believe there is more than one kind of bead lock. Judging from the pictures, it looks like that guy has the type that bolt to the outside of the wheel flange.

BTW, no need to get snotty...you're coming across as if you have a "you don't know what you're talking about" attitude. I'm not an expert on beadlocks or offroading in general. I'm only trying to explain how beadlocks work from my own experiences. I mounted tires to beadlock wheels and they mount up the same way as any other tire. The bead area of the rim is what seals the tire to the wheel and allows it to hold air. You can actually drive around all day without installing the beadlock ring and it would be perfectly functional. That's just my experience. Yours may differ.
 
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