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Discussion Starter #1
I checked the front break pads today, and found that they need to be changed soon. the current millage is 20K miles only, but I think they wear out quickly due to the excessive engagement of Traction control on sand dunes driving.

Any suggestions/recommendation of the new break pads? or shall I go for the OME ones.
 

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I would suggest going back with OEM, I had dealer replace mine He did not use OEM pads with in 5000 mile they started squeaking and had brake dust all over wheels. I took XK back they installed OEM pads at their cost.
 

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Any ceramic brake pad, if not you will get squeaking!
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Any particular brand of ceramic pads you recommend?

Is it ok to put on with the old rotors? or I have to replace them with ceramic ones
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Ranger6882 said:
make sure you or the person installing pads turns rotors.
Do you mean machining the rotors?
 

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Although it sounds unacceptable, machining of rotors is nowadays considered optional and only necessary if rotors are not parrellel [S.P.?], or they are scored from metal to metal contact. The reasoning is, why remove rotor material unless necessary to return to specification? Jeep says [all automakers say] the pads will conform to the minor rotor grooving during pad break in. Although it makes me a little nuts to do this, [Tech,46years], especially the first time years ago,it works just fine. The concept is an offshoot of motorcycle brake service. Their rotors are stainless steel and have very little material to give to machining. They would have to milled as opposed to turned and that would be expensive. Anyways, they always replace pads with no rotor service and it takes a 100 miles or so for them to bed in. Works fine.
Relative to pad material, you generally are trying to balance [compromise] between good wear, minimum rotor tearing, quiet operation, good and consistent pedal feel.
Everyone has their favorite.
With very few exceptions I still have the best results with the original equipment.
Now, if you are going to start track racing your Commander, then start using carbon ceramic or carbon metallic. Plan on rotor replacement due to hard spotting at every brake job. LOL.

I apologize in advance for the hub bub that will ensue due to the machining of rotor response, but, thats out of the common service manual.
I would however, machine the rotors if I was not using the o.e. pads, regardless of their condition.
More than $.02............Rob
 

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I've had nothing but good experiences with Raybestos QS (Quiet Stop) pads. They are a ceramic pad that are engineered to produce very little brake dust (the little dust they produce isn't black like OEM pads, but more of a light grey that doesn't make your wheels look dirty) and no noise.

If you don't want to go ceramic, they also make PG Plus pads which are also low dust and don't make noise. I have used nothing but these pads on all my vehicles in the past and I've been very happy with them. When my OEM pads wear out on my 4Runner, I'm definitely going with the QS pads.
 

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robby said:
Although it sounds unacceptable, machining of rotors is nowadays considered optional and only necessary if rotors are not parrellel [S.P.?], or they are scored from metal to metal contact. The reasoning is, why remove rotor material unless necessary to return to specification? Jeep says [all automakers say] the pads will conform to the minor rotor grooving during pad break in. Although it makes me a little nuts to do this, [Tech,46years], especially the first time years ago,it works just fine.
I think the never ending quest for higher fuel economy forced auto manufacturers to look for ways to save weight on their vehicles. Once easy way to do this is to use lighter weight rotors, which means that they are close to the minimum thickness specification even when new. Of course this means that they are basically throw-away rotors that are not able to be machined like the heavy rotors that came on older vehicles.

In a way, SUV and light truck drivers are lucky that our rotors are able to be machined and still be within minimum thickness tolerances. But it is still important to realize that any time you machine a rotor, there's less material remaining to disappate heat, therefore your rotors are more likely to warp and cause pulsation in the brake pedal. Personally, I'd rather just install new rotors instead of machining them, even on an SUV or light truck.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
robby said:
Although it sounds unacceptable, machining of rotors is nowadays considered optional and only necessary if rotors are not parrellel [S.P.?], or they are scored from metal to metal contact. The reasoning is, why remove rotor material unless necessary to return to specification? Jeep says [all automakers say] the pads will conform to the minor rotor grooving during pad break in. Although it makes me a little nuts to do this, [Tech,46years], especially the first time years ago,it works just fine. The concept is an offshoot of motorcycle brake service. Their rotors are stainless steel and have very little material to give to machining. They would have to milled as opposed to turned and that would be expensive. Anyways, they always replace pads with no rotor service and it takes a 100 miles or so for them to bed in. Works fine.
Relative to pad material, you generally are trying to balance [compromise] between good wear, minimum rotor tearing, quiet operation, good and consistent pedal feel.
Everyone has their favorite.
With very few exceptions I still have the best results with the original equipment.
Now, if you are going to start track racing your Commander, then start using carbon ceramic or carbon metallic. Plan on rotor replacement due to hard spotting at every brake job. LOL.

I apologize in advance for the hub bub that will ensue due to the machining of rotor response, but, thats out of the common service manual.
I would however, machine the rotors if I was not using the o.e. pads, regardless of their condition.
More than $.02............Rob
Thanks for your advise :) ,, I really appreciate it.

as a conclusion, I shouldn't machine the rotors and you prefer to keep using the OME pads.

I will take the first advice, but I'd rather go for the ceramic pads to at least get the benefit that it does not produce noticeable dust, and its not so expensive. cheaper than the OME ones.


TR4Runner said:
I've had nothing but good experiences with Raybestos QS (Quiet Stop) pads. They are a ceramic pad that are engineered to produce very little brake dust (the little dust they produce isn't black like OEM pads, but more of a light grey that doesn't make your wheels look dirty) and no noise.

If you don't want to go ceramic, they also make PG Plus pads which are also low dust and don't make noise. I have used nothing but these pads on all my vehicles in the past and I've been very happy with them. When my OEM pads wear out on my 4Runner, I'm definitely going with the QS pads.
Thanks,

Is it like this one ? http://cgi.ebay.com/ebaymotors/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=360031001258&_trksid=p2759.l1259
 

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It's hard to tell in that auction, but just look for the QS (quiet stop) designation or PG Plus if you decide that you don't want to go with ceramic. Some guys will use nothing but OEM pads, but in my opinion there are better pads out there that are also less expensive.

The ironic thing is that OEM brake pads are all made by the big name companies like Raybestos, Wagner, Bendix, etc... But most people don't know that and pay dealership prices for their brake pads.
 

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Discussion Starter #13

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Wow, I don't know what to say. I've never seen anything like that... I wonder if they could have been improperly installed? One of the posters mentioned that the company was sold and the quality suffered. I don't know if there's any truth to that, but there might be...

Then again, I'm sure if you look hard enough, you could find a similar story for just about any pads out there, so I wouldn't worry too much about it. If Raybesto pads were unsafe or bad quality, there would be posts all over the Internet like the one you linked.
 

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Discussion Starter #15 (Edited)

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Thats a interesting example of pad separation.
Usually caused by moisture migrating between pad and backing plate and then freezing and expanding.
I've seen it before on bonded [those are bonded] and riveted alike. On the riveted type the pad will tear over the rivet heads.
The car is located in Connecticit [S.P.?], a rather damp part of the country, and they were installed 4 years ago.
Thats kind of a down side to pad longetivity. You start seeing time related failures rather than wear failures.
Same pads in desert use would not show any of that separation.
I would be hard pressed to shoot down the manufacturer on that one.

............Rob
 

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TR4Runner said:
Wow, I don't know what to say. I've never seen anything like that... I wonder if they could have been improperly installed? One of the posters mentioned that the company was sold and the quality suffered. I don't know if there's any truth to that, but there might be...

Then again, I'm sure if you look hard enough, you could find a similar story for just about any pads out there, so I wouldn't worry too much about it. If Raybesto pads were unsafe or bad quality, there would be posts all over the Internet like the one you linked.

I have heard/seen examples of this with those pads, but it's from people that really drive hard. The quality had gone down hill after the change in-house. I hear that regular use isn't of much issue, but after seeing this several times, I will pass on Raybesto brand myself.

I would just stick with OEM stuff, unless you go for a real performance upgrade. Ahmed, you will see lots of wear due to enviroment issues, sand and such...
 

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Discussion Starter #19
jeep5253 said:

Thanks :) , Unfortunately, they don't make break pads for Commander! ,, only Spark plugs, Oil filters and Wiper blades


BigPoppaJNutZ said:
I have heard/seen examples of this with those pads, but it's from people that really drive hard. The quality had gone down hill after the change in-house. I hear that regular use isn't of much issue, but after seeing this several times, I will pass on Raybesto brand myself.

I would just stick with OEM stuff, unless you go for a real performance upgrade. Ahmed, you will see lots of wear due to enviroment issues, sand and such...
!! I start to get confused :confused:
 

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I'm saying use the OEM pads. That is a good bet. You will see regular wear with any pads due to all of the off road driving that you do.
 
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