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Discussion Starter #1
I did include this post in my introduction, so apologies if that's frowned upon. The reason I'm being so pushy is because I'm set to buy the Jeep today and want to make sure what I'm describing isn't an issue.

I've had my eye on a 2008 XK with Quadra-Trac II. I insisted the salesman get the mud and muck washed off the bottom and then bring it up on a lift so I could check for issues. Stuff like excessive rust, driveline play, leaks and stuff like that. Anyway, while I was checking the rear differential pinion for slop, I rotated the rear driveshaft by hand and to my surprise, it moved and so did the wheels. I assume the tech put it on park before raising it up, so I was a little confused. After looking it up, it appears Quadra-Trac II has the NV245, which functions as an open differential that can electronically lock up a clutch in case of slippage. Further, both the front and rear differentials are open and use brake distribution to behave like LSDs. I think this explains why I was able to freely rotate the rear driveshaft in park, granted with some effort. It seems this is behavior that's been confirmed on full time 4x4 Durangos on forums. My understanding is that this is because the transfer case is behind the transmission where the parking pawl is.

That, or I'm capable of producing 500hp with my arms. I'm thinking of buying this one, but the OCD side of me won't let go of the possibility that I damaged something. Can anyone weigh in and set my mind at ease? Any help or insight is greatly appreciate, thanks!
 

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I did include this post in my introduction, so apologies if that's frowned upon. The reason I'm being so pushy is because I'm set to buy the Jeep today and want to make sure what I'm describing isn't an issue.

I've had my eye on a 2008 XK with Quadra-Trac II. I insisted the salesman get the mud and muck washed off the bottom and then bring it up on a lift so I could check for issues. Stuff like excessive rust, driveline play, leaks and stuff like that. Anyway, while I was checking the rear differential pinion for slop, I rotated the rear driveshaft by hand and to my surprise, it moved and so did the wheels. I assume the tech put it on park before raising it up, so I was a little confused. After looking it up, it appears Quadra-Trac II has the NV245, which functions as an open differential that can electronically lock up a clutch in case of slippage. Further, both the front and rear differentials are open and use brake distribution to behave like LSDs. I think this explains why I was able to freely rotate the rear driveshaft in park, granted with some effort. It seems this is behavior that's been confirmed on full time 4x4 Durangos on forums. My understanding is that this is because the transfer case is behind the transmission where the parking pawl is.

That, or I'm capable of producing 500hp with my arms. I'm thinking of buying this one, but the OCD side of me won't let go of the possibility that I damaged something. Can anyone weigh in and set my mind at ease? Any help or insight is greatly appreciate, thanks!
It does have the NV245 transfer case - which is the same transfer case that Quadra-Drive II Commanders use - the only difference is Quadra-Drive II Commanders also have Electronic limited slip differentials - Quadra-Trac II Commanders do not.

If you test drive it make sure you can shift into and out of 4-LOW without receiving any Service 4WD System messages in the EVIC - that should tell you all you need to know.

Also read this thread:

http://www.jeepcommander.com/forums/5-general-commander-discussion/56546-looking-buy.html

It was also a VERY good idea to get the salesman to wash all the mud and muck off the bottom - and definitely inspect underneath thoroughly for any rust, leaks or signs of impact damage.

I'd also give the headliner a thorough visual inspection around the front Driver's side & front Passenger's side door and the headliner around the sunroof/s as Commanders are pretty notorious for water leaks - from either clogged sunroof drains; bad door seals - or doors that are out of alignment.

Check and see if it has a good service history and the previous owner/s have kept up on all of the maintenance.

The only other thing I'd recommend is to go to the website URL below and plug in the VIN to see if all the factory re-calls and campaigns have been completed:

Safety Recall Information | MOPAR

If the are any that are outstanding - and this XK you are looking at is for sale at a dealership - you can either get the dealership to have the recalls/campaigns completed before you pull the trigger and buy it (which is what I would do) or you could use the outstanding recalls/campaigns as a bargaining chip, to try and chew him down on the asking price.

The difference between a safety recall and a campaign is that a safety recall pertains to a vehicle problem that is a safety concern;

A campaign is a vehicle problem that is not a safety concern, but, pertains to customer satisfaction.

I hope this helps you, good luck and keep us posted.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
It does have the NV245 transfer case - which is the same transfer case that Quadra-Drive II Commanders use - the only difference is Quadra-Drive II Commanders also have Electronic limited slip differentials - Quadra-Trac II Commanders do not.

If you test drive it make sure you can shift into and out of 4-LOW without receiving any Service 4WD System messages in the EVIC - that should tell you all you need to know.

Also read this thread:

It was also a VERY good idea to get the salesman to wash all the mud and muck off the bottom - and definitely inspect underneath thoroughly for any rust, leaks or signs of impact damage.

I'd also give the headliner a thorough visual inspection around the front Driver's side & front Passenger's side door and the headliner around the sunroof/s as Commanders are pretty notorious for water leaks - from either clogged sunroof drains; bad door seals - or doors that are out of alignment.

Check and see if it has a good service history and the previous owner/s have kept up on all of the maintenance.

The only other thing I'd recommend is to go to the website URL below and plug in the VIN to see if all the factory re-calls and campaigns have been completed:


If the are any that are outstanding - and this XK you are looking at is for sale at a dealership - you can either get the dealership to have the recalls/campaigns completed before you pull the trigger and buy it (which is what I would do) or you could use the outstanding recalls/campaigns as a bargaining chip, to try and chew him down on the asking price.

The difference between a safety recall and a campaign is that a safety recall pertains to a vehicle problem that is a safety concern;

A campaign is a vehicle problem that is not a safety concern, but, pertains to customer satisfaction.

I hope this helps you, good luck and keep us posted.
Thanks, Big Blue!

I did check the Mopar safety recall page you posted. My VIN shows all the campaigns are completed, so that's good. I haven't tested the 4x4 Low option on it (never occurred to me). Can I test it on pavement and if so, what's the proper procedure to engage it?

I didn't see any obvious water damage in the headliner. However, the rectangular plastic trim piece that goes on the front sunroof was loose on the passenger side. I imagine it needs a trim clip or something of that nature. However, I will make sure all the drains are clear if I buy it. Incidentally, the driver side door does need an alignment, which I'll deal with, because they discounted that off the price. Their pre-inspection sheet showed that their was some brake pulsing, which I don't recall experiencing on the test drive, but I've also budgeted for new rotors and pads as needed.

My question is, is the behavior I described normal? That up on a lift, possibly in park, I was able to rotate the rear drive shaft like that on a Quadra-Trac II Jeep? I think that's my only major concern at this point. Everything else I can deal with. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks, Big Blue!

I did check the Mopar safety recall page you posted. My VIN shows all the campaigns are completed, so that's good. I haven't tested the 4x4 Low option on it (never occurred to me). Can I test it on pavement and if so, what's the proper procedure to engage it?

I didn't see any obvious water damage in the headliner. However, the rectangular plastic trim piece that goes on the front sunroof was loose on the passenger side. I imagine it needs a trim clip or something of that nature. However, I will make sure all the drains are clear if I buy it. Incidentally, the driver side door does need an alignment, which I'll deal with, because they discounted that off the price. Their pre-inspection sheet showed that their was some brake pulsing, which I don't recall experiencing on the test drive, but I've also budgeted for new rotors and pads as needed.

My question is, is the behavior I described normal? That up on a lift, possibly in park, I was able to rotate the rear drive shaft like that on a Quadra-Trac II Jeep? I think that's my only major concern at this point. Everything else I can deal with. :)
 

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Thanks, Big Blue!

I did check the Mopar safety recall page you posted. My VIN shows all the campaigns are completed, so that's good. I haven't tested the 4x4 Low option on it (never occurred to me). Can I test it on pavement and if so, what's the proper procedure to engage it?

I didn't see any obvious water damage in the headliner. However, the rectangular plastic trim piece that goes on the front sunroof was loose on the passenger side. I imagine it needs a trim clip or something of that nature. However, I will make sure all the drains are clear if I buy it. Incidentally, the driver side door does need an alignment, which I'll deal with, because they discounted that off the price. Their pre-inspection sheet showed that their was some brake pulsing, which I don't recall experiencing on the test drive, but I've also budgeted for new rotors and pads as needed.

My question is, is the behavior I described normal? That up on a lift, possibly in park, I was able to rotate the rear drive shaft like that on a Quadra-Trac II Jeep? I think that's my only major concern at this point. Everything else I can deal with. :)
Yes you can test it on pavement - and you absolutely have to test it to see if it's working properly.

If you want to be extra careful - you find a little dirt patch somewhere and test it - but I test mine on pavement every so often - and there are no ill-effects as long as you are careful, slow and deliberate - particularly when accelerating and definitely DO NOT make any sharp turns while you are in 4-LOW.

Have the vehicle at a dead stop, shift into neutral and pull the chrome T-Handle up and hold it up until you see that the electronic stability control disengages (little orange light with squiggly lines will light up on the dash) and the 4-LOW indicator lamp is lit up solid - not flashing.

I wouldn't drive it very far like that if you are on pavement and be very slow and deliberate when accelerating in 4-LOW - the gas pedal becomes very touchy.

Just a drive it about 20 feet or so and if everything is functioning properly - stop, put it in neutral again and hold the chrome T-Handle up until the 4-LOW light goes out and the electronic stability control re-engages (little orange light with squiggly lines on the dash will go out).
 

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Trying to think through the drive shaft situation... You must have been on a chassis lift and I'm thinking all 4 wheels spun in opposite directions. If any one or possibly 2 wheels were held still nothing would have moved more than a few degrees. Anyway bigblue is right... Test it on the ground, preferably on a slippery surface.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Trying to think through the drive shaft situation... You must have been on a chassis lift and I'm thinking all 4 wheels spun in opposite directions. If any one or possibly 2 wheels were held still nothing would have moved more than a few degrees. Anyway bigblue is right... Test it on the ground, preferably on a slippery surface.
Thanks for the input, Thance. Yes, it was on a chassis lift with all four wheels fully suspended. I was able to rotate the driveshaft probably enough to get the back tires to make a half revolution when I decided to stop. There wasn't more resistance than you'd expect and I could move it once the slack was out of the drivetrain. I was only watching the rear differential, so I can't say whether the front wheels were rotating or not. That said, I'm going to get to the dealer early and test the 4-LOW before I sign on any dotted lines. Luckily, it's been snowing here today. :)
 

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4-LOW worked fine. I'm going buy it. :) The only real issues is a bad TPMS sensor, but I knew about it and negotiated accordingly.
 

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NICE!!! I'm looking for another Commander to get...the wife "commands" the current one so...

Found one on CL, a 2008 with only 100K miles BUT no engine. Taking a look at it this weekend to give it a full inspection.
 

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Still waiting to see some pics...

4-LOW worked fine. I'm going buy it. :) The only real issues is a bad TPMS sensor, but I knew about it and negotiated accordingly.
@mphilleo;

You gonna post some pics of your new rig??
 
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