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Just had my rear brake pads replaced and rotors turned on my 2WD 06 Commander V8 4.7 at 65,000 miles. The pads were real low. What shocked me is that the front brakes had less than 10% wear, meaning to me that the rear brakes were doing all the work. That thought is kinda scarey to me. The tech said that Jeep's weight distribution is setup better than most vehicles for flatter breaking, but it seems extreme to me. I was wondering if it could be an incorrect computer setting?

I never tow anything and the rear is usually empty.

Any ideas? Or, is this just the way it is?

Thanks.
 

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Funny you mention this because I dropped off my XK to get the Cat changed and had them also perform a state inspection on it. The tech stated that I will need to replace the rear breaks soon and have my rotors turned. The sad part of that is that I only have 25,000 miles on it. I couldn't believe it. It passed inspection, but he stated that if I would have came a week later it would have probably failed. I haven't checked them out myself yet. I will though. If they need to be changed, I will change them myself with aftermarkets.
 

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I replaced my rear brakes and rotors a few months ago and didnt do the front because they still had a decient amont of pad left on them. However since I replace the rear rotars I have put about another 10,000 miles on the XK so ill need to replace the front pads and rotors soon.
 

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Did anybody notice if the rear pads have the squeak clip or whatever you want to call it? The one the squeals once the pads get low enough.
 

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I've noted this before but it bears repeating.
For whatever reason, and I suspect it to be weight distribution, the Commander brakes are rear biased.
You will note the rear wheels gather more brake dust than the fronts, meaning, the rears are wearing slightly faster than the fronts.
Add to this the rear pads/rotors are smaller than the fronts, so, if you tend to brake lightly, you will find the rears wear sooner than the fronts.
Those of us who are heavy pedal hitters find all the brakes shot about the same mileage.
I, like the OP am finding my rears wearing faster and I do tend to be a light pedal well in advance of the stop type brake user.
Fear not, this is really not a bad thing.
In the case of the OP it shows the results of gentle vehicle handling and nothing more.

Rob
 

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The main reason for the rear brake wear is that the front OE pads are ceramic, the rear pads are not. Therefore, they do wear quicker.

robby - I don't know if I buy that the Commander brakes are rear-biased - the front rotors are much larger and are vented - rear are not.
 

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The main reason for the rear brake wear is that the front OE pads are ceramic, the rear pads are not. Therefore, they do wear quicker.

robby - I don't know if I buy that the Commander brakes are rear-biased - the front rotors are much larger and are vented - rear are not.
Actually robby is correct.

Also, the front rotors being larger has nothing to do with it what so ever.
 

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FWIW, I'm a pretty light and early braker most of the time. My rears wear faster. Replaced rear pads and turned rear rotor at 65,000. Fronts still original and have about 25% left. I was quite pleasantly surprised at the longevity of my Commander's brakes. I've been checking them regularly.
 

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GPintheMitten - mine have held up great as well - 70K miles, and I just replaced the rear pads and rotors this past weekend (was getting the grinding noise in the back).

Got the parts to do the fronts (not an emergency, but they're almost due), but it started raining just when I finished the rear brakes - job for another weekend.
 

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Actually robby is correct.

Also, the front rotors being larger has nothing to do with it what so ever.
Acutally it has everything to do with it. Front brakes have larger rotors (1.2" thk vs. 0.6" thk), larger calipers with larger pistons, bigger pads, and ventilated rotors because they handle more friction than the rears. If by "biased to the rear brakes" you mean more than typical vehicles, maybe, but the rear brakes do less braking than the fronts in almost every vehicle.
 

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What I'm saying is ....the rear brakes are applying prior to the fronts.
Those who are light on the pedal will experience more rapid rear brake wear because the smaller pads on the smaller rotors using only one piston to apply will work harder to scrub off speed.
If you are heavier on the pedal, the pads wear fairly evenly because you are now balancing the brake pressure front to rear.
If you like to run up on stoplights, the fronts will wear faster than the rears because they have more clamping force available on hard pedal applications.

Does that explain it better?

Rob
 

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Acutally it has everything to do with it. Front brakes have larger rotors (1.2" thk vs. 0.6" thk), larger calipers with larger pistons, bigger pads, and ventilated rotors because they handle more friction than the rears. If by "biased to the rear brakes" you mean more than typical vehicles, maybe, but the rear brakes do less braking than the fronts in almost every vehicle.
Sorry about that. I think I got myself confused. I understand what you are saying.
 

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robby,
I'm sure there's a lot more going on with the modern braking system than I'm familiar with. There's computer-controlled braking, variable bias (didn't know about the progressive braking you described), and I know the stability control feature uses brakes on individual wheels in some cases to prevent tipping.

I just thought my rear pads wore faster because they were not ceramic (had brake dust in the rear, none in the front).
 

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Furthermore, if you go offroading often, you'll find that the brakes won't be even on one end (e.g. the front left may be worn more than the front right). This occurs with how the traction control works. It squeezes the brake on the tire that is spinning to equal out the friction between the two tires. The equal friction causes the open differentials on most XKs (some have limited slip) to drive both tires.
 

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I just thought my rear pads wore faster because they were not ceramic (had brake dust in the rear, none in the front).
This is probably a major factor. It would be interesting for someone w/a ceramic rear replacement to note the change in wear rate.

I am getting ready to replace the rears at 60k miles, this spring. The fronts still have 50%+ and I would not be surprised for them to last to 100k miles. Obviously, we are not heavy brakers.
 
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