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Discussion Starter #1
I’ve spent days reading all of the posts and stickies regarding lifts and shocks. I acquired a RC 2” lift from someone who purchased but never installed. I’ve read about how factory shocks and UCAs should be replaced. And everyone seems to love Bilstein’s. 5100s are supposed to be for lifted trucks and 4600s are stock replacements. But after coming up empty while searching for 5100s I contacted Bilstein directly for recommendations. Bilstein responded that the 4600s were the only shock/strut they had for Commanders and therefore cannot recommend anything for lifted Jeep. I’ve also read where people are using Bilstein’s for Grand Cherokees because of similar platform. But someone else posted that Bilstein would not honor the warranty because of wrong application. I’ve got a 2008 Sport. Any suggestions would be appreciated because my head is spinning right now.
 

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4600s will work. The RC lift and all spacer lifts work by lowering where your struts mount to the Jeep. So strut size is irrelevant unless you just want the added length an adjustable strut will give you. I have the RC lift and I replaced my stock struts with Monroe Quick Struts. I wish I would’ve used a better quality strut though because 3 years later my front end is sagging enough to notice. I used the load leveler F150 shocks in the back and they are still standing tall.
 

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Forgot to add that I also used the Moog problem solver UCAs and haven’t had any issues will ball joints in 3 years.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
4600s will work. The RC lift and all spacer lifts work by lowering where your struts mount to the Jeep. So strut size is irrelevant unless you just want the added length an adjustable strut will give you. I have the RC lift and I replaced my stock struts with Monroe Quick Struts. I wish I would’ve used a better quality strut though because 3 years later my front end is sagging enough to notice. I used the load leveler F150 shocks in the back and they are still standing tall.
That’s where I was getting lost. I understood that the RC was merely suspension lift. But when people were throwing around the 5100s but Bilstein said those don’t work on Commanders it threw me off. Heard lots of regrets on the Monroes too. For the F150 shocks did you just go by length? How did you know which ones to choose? I appreciate your feedback. Didn’t want to be the annoying newb that added a new post to a topic discussed ad nauseum. But many of the posts are from years ago and it seems frowned upon to resurrect dead threads too. And like I said, Bilstein wasn’t much help either.
 

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I’ve spent days reading all of the posts and stickies regarding lifts and shocks. I acquired a RC 2” lift from someone who purchased but never installed. I’ve read about how factory shocks and UCAs should be replaced. And everyone seems to love Bilstein’s. 5100s are supposed to be for lifted trucks and 4600s are stock replacements. But after coming up empty while searching for 5100s I contacted Bilstein directly for recommendations. Bilstein responded that the 4600s were the only shock/strut they had for Commanders and therefore cannot recommend anything for lifted Jeep. I’ve also read where people are using Bilstein’s for Grand Cherokees because of similar platform. But someone else posted that Bilstein would not honor the warranty because of wrong application. I’ve got a 2008 Sport. Any suggestions would be appreciated because my head is spinning right now.
You don't need any of that to install the RC lift unless you want to replace them. If not, just bolt on the RC lift and be done.


Keep your stock front and rear springs and if you want to replace the front shock then just buy the shock and have a shop swap out the old. This idea that you need new shocks is a new one for me.

Again, if you WANT new shocks by all means do it. If not then don't bother.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
You don't need any of that to install the RC lift unless you want to replace them. If not, just bolt on the RC lift and be done.


Keep your stock front and rear springs and if you want to replace the front shock then just buy the shock and have a shop swap out the old. This idea that you need new shocks is a new one for me.

Again, if you WANT new shocks by all means do it. If not then don't bother.
I figured it'd be a good idea to replace shocks anyway. I've had it for a year now and have spent a good portion of the time getting it mechanically sound. If the shocks aren't original, they still look pretty old/worn. At any rate, thanks for the help!
 

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I was in the same exact boat 1 year ago and bought my xk with a well rusted/worn out set of monroes on it...
knowing i needed shocks, did a lot of research, and probed real world local 4x4 shop experiences among all the other threads here.
I went 5100s all around, and since i ordered through amazon by part#, no vehicle entered, i believe the warranty remains in tact. LOVE these shocks !! Rides around town like a caddy and soaks up loads of whoop de doos with very little fade. Highly reccommend, and if your willing to meet up for a brew on the east side, you can give it a test drive and see for yourself!
 

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I was in the same exact boat 1 year ago and bought my xk with a well rusted/worn out set of monroes on it...
knowing i needed shocks, did a lot of research, and probed real world local 4x4 shop experiences among all the other threads here.
I went 5100s all around, and since i ordered through amazon by part#, no vehicle entered, i believe the warranty remains in tact. LOVE these shocks !! Rides around town like a caddy and soaks up loads of whoop de doos with very little fade. Highly reccommend, and if your willing to meet up for a brew on the east side, you can give it a test drive and see for yourself!
Test drive sounds cool. Beer on the east side sounds even better (cousins lived at 12/Gratiot growing up). Unfortunately this is the time of year my kids’ sports schedules drive me nuts. Daughter’s high school basketball team continue to play all summer to stay competitive. And my son is on a travel lacrosse team. We’ll be in Indy this weekend for his tournament. I’m thinking sooner rather than later on replacing shocks. Rain check on the beer! Thanks for the advice
 

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I was in the same exact boat 1 year ago and bought my xk with a well rusted/worn out set of monroes on it...
knowing i needed shocks, did a lot of research, and probed real world local 4x4 shop experiences among all the other threads here.
I went 5100s all around, and since i ordered through amazon by part#, no vehicle entered, i believe the warranty remains in tact. LOVE these shocks !! Rides around town like a caddy and soaks up loads of whoop de doos with very little fade. Highly reccommend, and if your willing to meet up for a brew on the east side, you can give it a test drive and see for yourself!

Did you buy quick struts or have a shop swap out the front springs to the new shocks?


Also, it's helpful if you direct link the shocks you installed on your vehicle so others can find them easily.
 

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That’s where I was getting lost. I understood that the RC was merely suspension lift. But when people were throwing around the 5100s but Bilstein said those don’t work on Commanders it threw me off. Heard lots of regrets on the Monroes too. For the F150 shocks did you just go by length? How did you know which ones to choose? I appreciate your feedback. Didn’t want to be the annoying newb that added a new post to a topic discussed ad nauseum. But many of the posts are from years ago and it seems frowned upon to resurrect dead threads too. And like I said, Bilstein wasn’t much help either.
Jerry;

First & foremost, the RC Lift is a spacer lift - NOT a suspension lift. Despite what Bilstein's website says - or what they tell you, you can go with 4600's or 5100's they both will fit; the 5100's are longer - which is good for the rear in particular, because it will allow your rear axle a little more travel.

Before I upgraded to the Superlift, I had B6 4600's in the front and 5100's (non-adjustable) in the rear. I actually still have my B6 4600's up front (Part # 24-186797).

Just pay attention to which 5100's you order, because they have a few different variations of it - height adjustable and not height adjustable for starters. Either one will work, just want you to be aware that there are a few different variations of it.
 

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I know it's just me being nitpicky but the rc lift IS a suspension lift. Although it doesn't replace any of suspension components, it does use spacers to alter the suspension geometry of the vehicle which makes it a suspension lift.

Body lifts also use spacers, but those spacers go in between the body and the frame of the vehicle. XK's don't have independent bodies and frames so those are not an option for us.
 

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I know it's just me being nitpicky but the rc lift IS a suspension lift. Although it doesn't replace any of suspension components, it does use spacers to alter the suspension geometry of the vehicle which makes it a suspension lift.

Body lifts also use spacers, but those spacers go in between the body and the frame of the vehicle. XK's don't have independent bodies and frames so those are not an option for us.
I disagree with you;

In my view (and I think most would agree) a suspension lift does what the name implies - it replaces and upgrades the components of the suspension - shocks & springs are the most common components replaced in lifts like the Old Man EMU lift & Rocky Roads Lift kit; With the more serious suspension lifts like the Superlift - and other high-end variations of it, lower control arms, steering knuckles & sometimes upper control arms are replaced.

Using metal spacers to raise the ride height - which is all you're doing with lift kits like the RC Lift & Heavy Metal lift kit, does not do that - which is why they are almost exclusively referred to as "Spacer Lifts" which again, does what the name implies - it raises the ride height with metal spacers. That's all they were designed to do - raise the ride height.

If you want to hinge your point on the fact that the increased ride height alters the suspension geometry (which is a weak argument at best) I'll counter that with the fact that the resulting altered suspension geometry, is merely a default bi-product of the increased ride height - spacer lifts absolutely ARE NOT engineered to give you a specific, calculated, suspension geometry change.

Suspension lifts are engineered to do that, which is why they come with their own specific components, which are engineered to achieve a specific, resulting, altered suspension geometry; Superlift even goes as far as providing an Electronic Geometry Recalibration module to reprogram the Commander's Electronic Stability Control Module.

That's why 95% of informed people you talk to on the subject, call lift kits like the Rough Country & Heavy Metal lift kits what they are - spacer lift kits.

I think you look pretty silly arguing anything to the contrary - but of course, you're entitled to your opinion.
 

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I disagree you;

In my view (and I think most would agree) a suspension lift does what the name implies - it replaces and upgrades the components of the suspension - shocks & springs are the most common components replaced in lifts like the Old Man EMU lift & Rocky Roads Lift kit; With the more serious suspension lifts like the Superlift - and other high-end variations of it, lower control arms, steering knuckles & sometimes upper control arms are replaced.

Using metal spacers to raise the ride height - which is all you're doing with lift kits like the RC Lift & Heavy Metal lift kit, does not do that - which is why they are almost exclusively referred to as "Spacer Lifts" which again, does what the name implies - it raises the ride height with metal spacers. That's all they were designed to do - raise the ride height.

If you want to hinge your point on the fact that the increased ride height alters the suspension geometry (which is a weak argument at best) I'll counter that with the fact that the resulting altered suspension geometry, is merely a default bi-product of the increased ride height - spacer lifts absolutely ARE NOT engineered to give you a specific, calculated, suspension geometry change.

Suspension lifts are engineered to do that, which is why they come with their specific components, which are engineered to achieve a specific, resulting, altered suspension geometry; Superlift even goes as far as providing an Electronic Geometry Recalibration module to reprogram the Commander's Electronic Stability Control Module.

That's why 95% of informed people you talk to on the subject, call lift kits like the Rough Country & Heavy Metal lift kits what they are - spacer lifts.

I think you look pretty silly arguing anything to the contrary - but of course, you're entitled to your opinion.
Oh boy here we go again. First let me preface this with my comp died and I am typing on my phone so please disregard in grammatical errors.

From what I have gathered while on this forum is that bigblue likes to argue and does not like to be wrong. That however doesn't make "your view" the letter of the law. And while you do share a great amount of good information I have also seen you share some very wrong information. And it's the rebuttals like these that I have come to expect. I have been lifting and offroading vehicles for 25+ years now, and working on vehicles with my mechanic (Jeep mechanic at that) father for 30+. I can't be positive, as there is now way to put a numerical value on it, but I would put every dollar I own down in saying that I have more experience in this realm than you. I might be wrong but either way here are some facts.

The two ways you can lift a vehicle (not including portal axles) is by lifting (altering) the suspension or by lifting (altering) the body hieght.

Spacer lifts are suspension lifts as they alter (change) the vehicles ride height by changing or, in this case, moving suspension components. Yes the more serious suspension lift kits include altered components because you are changing the geometry so much that it would be dangerous, or even impossible, to drive in it's altered state without corrective measures. However when only small lifts are being achieved replacing components may not be necessary, however the suspension geometry has still changed. The OME kit for instance replaces stock suspension components but does not include any other components to re correct the suspension geometry. They recommend you get an alignment (not mandatory btw, but strongly suggested) and even after an alignment not all vehicles will be within factory specs. This is because it isn't designed to achieve a "specific, calculated, geometry change" they just know that this is within tolerance of the maximum change before stock components fail. To be clear I am not saying the spacers are a suspension lift because they are meant to change the geometry of the suspension, "because that would be a weak argument." I am saying they are a suspension lift because they alter the suspension. I am also a geometry teacher, if I need to show you some formulas about how a .75 inch drop can change working angles in a triangulated suspension system I can. These changes might be negligible when compared to say a 6 inch superlift, but it is still different than stock. Yes these are a bi-product of the lowered upper mounting location of the strut itself, but it is being lowered to push the steering and suspension components down further from the "body" in order to lift the vehicle.

I have an XJ with about 8 inches of lift sitting on 36s, I had a WJ with about 4 inches of lift sitting on 33s. I have my XK now with about 3 inches of lift, and my wife had a WK and currently has a KL with about 2 inches. I installed the lifts on all of these vehicles. These range from springs and spacers and long arms at the top all the way down to just spacers at the bottom. But they are all suspension lifts, because the suspension was altered (maybe not replaced) to achieve the change in ride height.

Now often times spacer lifts are called budget boosts because they are cheaper than replacing coil springs and whatnot, but they still fall in the category of altering the suspension to change ride height. Now as for your 95% y'all can call it whatever you want but I know what I am talking about. They may have gotten their own name but they fall in the category of suspension lifts. Kinda like how a tomato is a fruit but everyone just calls it a vegetable. 🍅 🍅 🍅

And just for craps and giggles (yes I sensor myself on the internet just like the classroom) here are a few pics for ya.

I'm not arguing using opinions here, I'm arguing using definitions. Now to quote a good friend of mine.... "I think you look pretty silly arguing anything to the contrary - but of course, you're entitled to your opinion." - Big Blue 2019
 

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Oh boy here we go again. First let me preface this with my comp died and I am typing on my phone so please disregard in grammatical errors.

From what I have gathered while on this forum is that bigblue likes to argue and does not like to be wrong. That however doesn't make "your view" the letter of the law. And while you do share a great amount of good information I have also seen you share some very wrong information. And it's the rebuttals like these that I have come to expect. I have been lifting and offroading vehicles for 25+ years now, and working on vehicles with my mechanic (Jeep mechanic at that) father for 30+. I can't be positive, as there is now way to put a numerical value on it, but I would put every dollar I own down in saying that I have more experience in this realm than you. I might be wrong but either way here are some facts.

The two ways you can lift a vehicle (not including portal axles) is by lifting (altering) the suspension or by lifting (altering) the body hieght.

Spacer lifts are suspension lifts as they alter (change) the vehicles ride height by changing or, in this case, moving suspension components. Yes the more serious suspension lift kits include altered components because you are changing the geometry so much that it would be dangerous, or even impossible, to drive in it's altered state without corrective measures. However when only small lifts are being achieved replacing components may not be necessary, however the suspension geometry has still changed. The OME kit for instance replaces stock suspension components but does not include any other components to re correct the suspension geometry. They recommend you get an alignment (not mandatory btw, but strongly suggested) and even after an alignment not all vehicles will be within factory specs. This is because it isn't designed to achieve a "specific, calculated, geometry change" they just know that this is within tolerance of the maximum change before stock components fail. To be clear I am not saying the spacers are a suspension lift because they are meant to change the geometry of the suspension, "because that would be a weak argument." I am saying they are a suspension lift because they alter the suspension. I am also a geometry teacher, if I need to show you some formulas about how a .75 inch drop can change working angles in a triangulated suspension system I can. These changes might be negligible when compared to say a 6 inch superlift, but it is still different than stock. Yes these are a bi-product of the lowered upper mounting location of the strut itself, but it is being lowered to push the steering and suspension components down further from the "body" in order to lift the vehicle.

I have an XJ with about 8 inches of lift sitting on 36s, I had a WJ with about 4 inches of lift sitting on 33s. I have my XK now with about 3 inches of lift, and my wife had a WK and currently has a KL with about 2 inches. I installed the lifts on all of these vehicles. These range from springs and spacers and long arms at the top all the way down to just spacers at the bottom. But they are all suspension lifts, because the suspension was altered (maybe not replaced) to achieve the change in ride height.

Now often times spacer lifts are called budget boosts because they are cheaper than replacing coil springs and whatnot, but they still fall in the category of altering the suspension to change ride height. Now as for your 95% y'all can call it whatever you want but I know what I am talking about. They may have gotten their own name but they fall in the category of suspension lifts. Kinda like how a tomato is a fruit but everyone just calls it a vegetable. 🍅 🍅 🍅

And just for craps and giggles (yes I sensor myself on the internet just like the classroom) here are a few pics for ya.

I'm not arguing using opinions here, I'm arguing using definitions. Now to quote a good friend of mine.... "I think you look pretty silly arguing anything to the contrary - but of course, you're entitled to your opinion." - Big Blue 2019
We can agree to disagree; I admire you many years of experience installing lifts, but last time I checked, you told me you were a school teacher - you might consider sticking to your real occupation as a school teacher and stop trying to pass yourself off as a legitimate, licensed mechanic - which is something that you definitely are not.

I'm not a mechanic and I've said that on this forum more times than I can count, but, I've had my Commander for 5 years - 4 of which I had the 2 inch RC lift and now I've had the 4 inch Superlift with 33's on my XK which is the equivalent of a 6 inch lift for the last year; I had a 2008 WK for 4 years prior to that, also with the 2 inch RC lift, so, I think I'm qualified to speak intelligently on the subject.

You can argue definitions all you like; I'm arguing the actual functionality of the lift, the components it uses, what it actually achieves and how it achieves lift in terms of the stock suspension components and the fact that spacer lifts are not (by your own admission) engineered for a specific, calculated, suspension geometry change.

They are designed to raise the ride height, not by making any significant modifications to the suspension but by sticking these 4 big hockey puck metal spacers in between the struts & shocks mounting points, nothing more.

You say spacer lifts raise the ride height by changing the suspension geometry, I contend they change the ride height by installing those 4 big hockey puck metal spacers; After all - what would a Rough Country or Heavy Metal lift kit consist of without those big metal spacers? The answer is nothing at all.

Oh yeah, I can attach pictures too; Here is a nice big picture of the 2 inch RC lift kit - straight off of Rough Country's website just for you:




Do you see any "suspension altering" components in there? I sure don't. I see metal spacers, that's it - hence the name, spacer lift.

Your long-winded post does nothing to change my point of view - or the validity of what I'm saying.

I've been wrong on this forum before - more than once in fact - and I've openly admitted as much, but I don't believe this is one of those times.

I have no problem with being contradicted - but I will not put up with being taunted or insulted and this is not the first time you let your mouth get the better of you when talking to me on this forum;

heffercow said:
From what I have gathered while on this forum is that bigblue likes to argue and does not like to be wrong. That however doesn't make "your view" the letter of the law.

Now to quote a good friend of mine.... "I think you look pretty silly arguing anything to the contrary - but of course, you're entitled to your opinion." - Big Blue 2019
The fact of the matter is, I don't like arguing at all; You may not like what I said and you may not agree with what I said and that's fine; You're entitled to your opinion.

That being said, I absolutely will not be taunted, belittled or insulted by you on this forum - ever again; I go out of my way on a daily basis on this forum to try and help people, more-so than most anyone you'll ever come across on this site - and I definitely don't need to take any crap from you.

I understand that being a Forum Moderator here is a pretty thankless job and I don't expect any pats on the back from anyone;

None the less, the title and the job warrants a certain level of respect on this forum and it's about time you came to that realization;

Enjoy your vacation, maybe you can try engaging in a little self reflection while your gone;

And remember, sometimes less is more.
 

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I have no need for emotional personal references, just simple facts.
As much as i appreciate good debate, The validity of one or the other being more "suspension" is completely moot.
Lots of semantics here, but very little actually to argue about.
Spacer lifts are altering the suspension, NOT just the body position relative to frame, and thus ARE a TYPE of suspension lift. I think the moniker "spacer lift" was intended to clarify they were NOT what most would consider a Full suspension RELOCATION kit.
The superlift kit does also alter the suspension but instead of the change happening at the strut mount and chassis, it accomplishes the same result (+ extra) by pushing the the entire drivetrain and control arm mountings downward. The corrected geometry of the mounting points only increases the net lift gains by the design. Yes you get more height, and better wear/tear due to the lesser angular stress on the joints, but that doesnt make it any more of a "suspension" lift than using spacers.

Josh
 

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I have no need for emotional personal references, just simple facts.
As much as i appreciate good debate, The validity of one or the other being more "suspension" is completely moot.
Lots of semantics here, but very little actually to argue about.
Spacer lifts are altering the suspension, NOT just the body position relative to frame, and thus ARE a TYPE of suspension lift. I think the moniker "spacer lift" was intended to clarify they were NOT what most would consider a Full suspension RELOCATION kit.
The superlift kit does also alter the suspension but instead of the change happening at the strut mount and chassis, it accomplishes the same result (+ extra) by pushing the the entire drivetrain and control arm mountings downward. The corrected geometry of the mounting points only increases the net lift gains by the design. Yes you get more height, and better wear/tear due to the lesser angular stress on the joints, but that doesnt make it any more of a "suspension" lift than using spacers.

Josh
Josh,

I respect your opinion, I guess the bottom line is I have a different interpretation of what a suspension altering lift is than what you and @heffercow do.

When you look at the picture of what a 2 inch RC lift actually is - which is nothing more than 4 metal spacers, that is and always will be a spacer lift in my view, for reasons that I've beaten to death in this thread already.

But again, I appreciate your insight and your opinion, thanks for sharing.
 

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I disagree with you;

In my view (and I think most would agree) a suspension lift does what the name implies - it replaces and upgrades the components of the suspension - shocks & springs are the most common components replaced in lifts like the Old Man EMU lift & Rocky Roads Lift kit; With the more serious suspension lifts like the Superlift - and other high-end variations of it, lower control arms, steering knuckles & sometimes upper control arms are replaced.

Using metal spacers to raise the ride height - which is all you're doing with lift kits like the RC Lift & Heavy Metal lift kit, does not do that - which is why they are almost exclusively referred to as "Spacer Lifts" which again, does what the name implies - it raises the ride height with metal spacers. That's all they were designed to do - raise the ride height.

If you want to hinge your point on the fact that the increased ride height alters the suspension geometry (which is a weak argument at best) I'll counter that with the fact that the resulting altered suspension geometry, is merely a default bi-product of the increased ride height - spacer lifts absolutely ARE NOT engineered to give you a specific, calculated, suspension geometry change.

Suspension lifts are engineered to do that, which is why they come with their own specific components, which are engineered to achieve a specific, resulting, altered suspension geometry; Superlift even goes as far as providing an Electronic Geometry Recalibration module to reprogram the Commander's Electronic Stability Control Module.

That's why 95% of informed people you talk to on the subject, call lift kits like the Rough Country & Heavy Metal lift kits what they are - spacer lift kits.

I think you look pretty silly arguing anything to the contrary - but of course, you're entitled to your opinion.
Literally everyone that has chimed in DOES NOT agree with you. There are two basic ways to lift a vehicle, by lifting the body from the frame, or by lifting the suspension itself. There are many ways to lift the suspension, a spacer lift being one of them, but it IS a suspension lift. It is simply a sub-type.

A suspension lift LIFTS THE SUSPENSION!!!

The fact that you have ONLY lifted your Commander is why you don't understand this. I have lifted the suspension on many vehicles with many different methods. I have cranked and replaced torsion bars, replaced leaf springs, installed spacers as well as replaced coil springs. ALL of those are suspension lifts. The ONLY thing that ISN'T is installing spacers between the frame and the body, which is a BODY lift (and that won't work on the Commander because it is a unibody design)!

You are adding parts (spacers) which LIFT the SUSPENSION. It's a SUSPENSION lift. Even the manufacturer calls it that! Spacer lift is simply which type of suspension lift it is, and there are many, just not for the Commander.
 

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Literally everyone that has chimed in DOES NOT agree with you. There are two ways basic to lift a vehicle, by lifting the body from the frame, or by lifting the suspension itself. There are many ways to lift the suspension, a spacer lift being one of them, but it IS a suspension lift. It is simply a sub-type.

A suspension lift LIFTS THE SUSPENSION!!!

The fact that you have ONLY lifted your Commander is why you don't understand this. I have lifted the suspension on many vehicles with many different methods. I have cranked and replaced torsion bars, replaced leaf springs, installed spacers as well as replaced coil springs. ALL of those are suspension lifts. The ONLY thing that ISN'T is installing spacers between the frame and the body, which is a BODY lift (and that won't work on the Commander because it is a unibody design)!

You are adding parts (spacers) which LIFT the SUSPENSION. It's a SUSPENSION lift. Even the manufacturer calls it that! Spacer lift is simply which type of suspension lift it is, and there are many, just not for the Commander.
You are totally correct, @GTF. I saw this thread earlier and was going to come back and post the same thing you said about the 2 types of lifts.
 

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I’ve spent days reading all of the posts and stickies regarding lifts and shocks. I acquired a RC 2” lift from someone who purchased but never installed. I’ve read about how factory shocks and UCAs should be replaced. And everyone seems to love Bilstein’s. 5100s are supposed to be for lifted trucks and 4600s are stock replacements. But after coming up empty while searching for 5100s I contacted Bilstein directly for recommendations. Bilstein responded that the 4600s were the only shock/strut they had for Commanders and therefore cannot recommend anything for lifted Jeep. I’ve also read where people are using Bilstein’s for Grand Cherokees because of similar platform. But someone else posted that Bilstein would not honor the warranty because of wrong application. I’ve got a 2008 Sport. Any suggestions would be appreciated because my head is spinning right now.
To address your question here, Bilstein only officially offers the 4600 series for the Commander, and they'll be just fine with the 2" lift. As I recall, some folks will install 5100s instead (usually the ones for the Grand Cherokee I think which have basically identical suspensions) even though they are not officially supported. There are several part numbers on here for them.

There are a couple reasons for that. One being that you can get 5100s for the front that are adjustable and actually lift the suspension (YES, that would make it at least PART of a suspension lift). The 5100s for the rear DO NOT lift at all, but they CAN be longer than the stock shocks if the correct ones are installed.

If you are getting a spacer lift, you probably don't need the 5100s in the front, as lifting it any more will cause problems. You could put them in the rear with the spacer lift if you want the extra travel as they are longer than the stock size, however your rear suspension will probably hit your gas tank skid plate, negating most of the additional travel that you would gain (although there is a fix for that too if you really want that extra travel). You're totally fine to just throw the 4600s all around with the spacers.
 
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