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Discussion Starter #1
Went into discount tire today to get the wheels rotated and let them know how often I am putting air in the tires. Being as awesome as they are, they went the extra step after dipping them and finding no leak. When they pulled the rubber off the rim there it was... Corrosion!!! I had jeep replace the sensors because they rotted and cracked now the Damn find are corroding!
Just a warning to others if you are having an issue with tire pressure.

Now some ideas:

1. Powder coating the stock rims...
2. New rims

My question... Will powder coating stop the rotting?
BTW had to replace a tpms that was already replaced by Jeep!!!
 

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Which wheels do you have ?
 

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I think that corrosion of that sort is the arguement for filling with nitrogen.

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SGH-I727 using AutoGuide.Com Free App
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I have the rocky mountain edition with 17in Chrome wheels.
Or shall I say Fancy plastic Chrome covers
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Lekmdm, nitrogen helps deter corrossion?
Googleing it now.
 

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I was not trying to convince you to use nitrogen. I've never used it and never had corrosion. But I'm glad you've expanded your knowledge base.

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I was not trying to convince you to use nitrogen. I've never used it and never had corrosion. But I'm glad you've expanded your knowledge base.

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It's all about preventive maintainance. Just a little late on this one...
 

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Nitrogen won't do a thing for corrosion......that is a B/S routine nitrofill likes to use for advertising.
First, if moisture was of a high enouph percentage inside the tire the entire rim inner body would show corrosion.
I'm sure yours was flawless, as everyone you look at will be.

So, the question becomes, 'Why is there corrosion at an area that is supposed to be sealed from air?...ie, the bead.'

The answer is, at some time in the past, someone used a soapy water mix as a bead lubricant.
Or, someone mixed water with a product called Ryue-Glide....this is a bead lubricant.

When water of any percentage is used as a bead sealant, it becomes sealed in the bead ridge area between tire and rim.
So, we have now introduced H2O into a sealed aluminum area.
You are looking at the results on the corroded bead.....as the corrosion builds, it begins to lift the tire away from the bead, allowing air to escape.
To this, add the road salt that is thrown at the wheels all winter that works its way into the, now compromised, sealing area.

So, there is no amount of nitrogen that would or could help because neither air nor nitrogen would ever be in the bead area if it had not had a corrosive introduced.

What can be done at this point?

With the tire removed, you can use a fine grade scuff block by 3M to clean the corrosion from the bead area.
If the bead feels smooth with no pits, you may remount/balance the tire using silicon spray as a lubricant.....this will prevent further corrosion.
If you can feel pits in the bead after using the scuff block, you can utilize a bead sealant.
This is sold by any good auto parts store.
Once the tire is on the rim but NOT inflated, you use the applicator in the sealant to coat the inner and outer bead area of the tire, then inflate and balance.

Using the silicone spray or the sealant will eliminate further corrosion at the sealing area of the rim.

Rob
 

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I'm sure Robby is spot on, as usual.

I was of the impression that the places that use nitrogen to fill tires make sure that nitrogen is dry. That's part of the point behind it. When you fill with regular air, if the pump or compressor don't filter out the humidity, especially on a humid day, you will eventually build up vapor inside the tire that may corrode the inside. It makes some sense to me, but I prefer Robby's explanation.
 
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