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I've been wondering about the differences between the different kinds of tow or recovery straps available. Some just have loops at each end, some have hooks, some have hooks with clips, and some have D rings. I have one that has a hook on each end, but I was wondering if this is a good one for pulling people out of snow or mud.

Enlighten me! :bowdown:
 

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Fantastic question, I am in the market for one now that I have a winch and was wondering the same thing.

I read that one without metal hooks is required for the Jeep Jamboree.
 

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I got my tow strap before I read up on them and it has hooks. Next time, I will get a strap with just rope.

There is also a difference between "recovery" straps and "tow" straps and they should be used appropriately (ie, don't recover with a tow and don't tow with a recover).

My understanding of the difference is that the "recovery" straps have elastic in them and stretch in order to provide more "pull" during the recovery. The tow strap doesn't stretch like that and should doesn't work AS WELL (but does still work) for recovery.
 

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there are many types of straps.

stay away from those with metal hooks. they are dangerous. the hooks are usually made from cast material. they are not rated high enough for recovery purposes.

Bull Dog and Warn are a few of the straps i would trust. i have a t-max tree strap, it works very well for winching off trees and i have used it a few times for yanking people. its a little too short for that.

i would get one rated at a minimum of 2 X's the vehicle weight. there is a lot of force exerted when you yank someone out.

stay away from cables or chain. when they break, and they do break, they will continue flying until they hit something or someone. there have been many people killed by chains in mines in extraction situations. i used to work for a coal mine in montana, they showed us a few videos and pictures of what happens when they let loose.

a strap is better because it will not fly. when it breaks there isn't any weight in the material to send it flying. so they tend to fall to the ground.

someone else can think of the scientific terms for what i am trying to say, my physics classes are a bit rusty.

here is a good rule of thumb for using them. i found this on this website
http://www.uscargocontrol.com/recoverytowstraps-c-48.html?gclid=CIDioJ_J9pcCFQ8Qagodlw8UEA


HELPFUL HINTS FOR RECOVERY/TOWING
*Always inspect before damage prior to use.
*To attach, wrap around an appropriate frame point and thread the strap through the eye of the other end to choke the frame.
*For recovery application, always securely attach the hardware to the recovery vehicle. Our anchor shackles are great for recovery vehicles.
*Keep free of debris or material that may cut or damage the recovery or tow strap.
*Always keep safety in mind when recovering a vehicle. It is possible a strap could break if impaired or used improperly and result in damage or injury.
*A good rule of thumb is for the vehicle weight to be half the break strength of the recovery strap.
*When choosing a recovery strap, you should choose a tow strap that is strong enough, but not so strong that it won't stretch. It is essential for the recovery strap to be allowed to stretch so the memory of the nylon webbing will help "snap" the vehicle out and take some of the shock out of the initial pull.

here is another good link

http://www.offroaders.com/tech/Tow_Straps.htm
 

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So the 2" 20,000 lb strap should be more than enough for our Commanders? What is the recommended length?
 

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I agree with GETLOST4X4 ... simple recovery straps with no hooks are best!
 

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So the 2" 20,000 lb strap should be more than enough for our Commanders? What is the recommended length?
The most common is 20' long and 2" wide. You can get longer straps if you need it but I would not go shorter. A shorter straps runs the risk of a collision on the trail. Be sure to buy a tow strap or recovery strap and not a lifting or tie-down strap. Tow or recovery straps have a webbing that is designed to act like a rubber band to help snap the stuck vehicle out. A lift or tie-down strap doesn't have the same webbing design and cannot handle the same shock force.
 

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I just bought a 30' by 3" recovery strap from Farm and Fleet rated for 27000 pounds. It was about $50 and also got 2 d-ring shackles w/screw pins rated at 12000 pounds each. I actually got to use it this morning :)

I am new to the off-road game, so my Brother-in-law has been giving lots of advice. One thing he told me, plain and simple, is "Hooks kill people". He has a 30' by 6" recovery strap - that thing is a beast.
 

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i know most people here probably know this....but you may be trail riding with others who dont and will want to try this........

--using a ball to hook to--

since the big push is for NO metal hooks on straps, people get the recovery straps with loops...but i have heard time and time again where people put the loop over a standard ball on the hitch and try to tug someone out.

a ball hitch is not able to stand the shock and energy from the recover strap when it stretches and then snaps back....the ball can be ripped clean off and becomes a projectile in a giant sling shot, which is just as dangerous of not more, as a tow strap with a metal hook.

if you buy a strap with no metal hooks, you dont solve anything if your method of attaching to the vehicles is faulty.....

as stated above....towing and recovery are not the same.....and make sure whereever you hook it to the vehicle, if you are using a recovery strap, your hooks or loops are rated for "recovery".....not all tow hooks are......i think most mopar hooks are but....the hooks you some times see in receiver hitches may not be.
If your hooks is not recovery rated i wouldn't suggest using a recovery strap. keep then in mind before you offer to pull some one else out...their vehicle hooks may not stand up and your vehicle my get drilled when the other guy's tow hooks come flying off. and you were trying to be the nice guy and help them out and you end up having the damage or getting hurt.

I know this think can happen because my brothers ford pickup had a tow loop ripped clean off the frame a few years back.

I am not as big of a fan of the "recovery" (stretchy) straps cause some many people like to hit the strap with a lot of speed.....its works good if all the parts are rated for it and you are really really stuck......but when possible i prefer to use towing straps and gently take the tension out by slowing moving the pulling vehicle forward, taking out all slack, and then using a stead pull with no jerking. I usually have the stuck vehicle already in gear and helping with the wheels turning as the pulling vehicles eases into the tow.
This is just my experiences. i have seen a lot of log chains and straps break so this is my prefered method.

i also carry axle straps for helping those vehicle with no tow hooks or loops. the straps are usually able to go around the body of the axle or part of the frame and give you some where to hook into with a d ring.
 

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I went to 4WheelParts to pick up my Smittybilt tire deflators ($40) and they had a Smittybilt winch accessory kit on sale too (all Smittybilt products 20% off)

Kit included: Storage bag, Gloves, 17,600 lb. Snatch Block, 10,000 lbs. D Ring, 4x20 30,000 lb Recovery Strap and Chain. ($91.83 w/tax)
 

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you should really get a snatch block that is double your winch capacity. when you use you snatch block and hook it back to yourself you are effectivly doubling the power of your winch.

with a 9000# winch you should have an 18000# snatch block.

just a suggestion. i don't want to hear about your head missing from a broken winch part.



I went to 4WheelParts to pick up my Smittybilt tire deflators ($40) and they had a Smittybilt winch accessory kit on sale too (all Smittybilt products 20% off)

Kit included: Storage bag, Gloves, 17,600 lb. Snatch Block, 10,000 lbs. D Ring, 4x20 30,000 lb Recovery Strap and Chain. ($91.83 w/tax)
 

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you should really get a snatch block that is double your winch capacity. when you use you snatch block and hook it back to yourself you are effectivly doubling the power of your winch.

with a 9000# winch you should have an 18000# snatch block.

just a suggestion. i don't want to hear about your head missing from a broken winch part.
Snatch Block was rated at 17,600 lbs, sorry I forgot that (updated original post).
 

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i know most people here probably know this....but you may be trail riding with others who dont and will want to try this........

--using a ball to hook to--

since the big push is for NO metal hooks on straps, people get the recovery straps with loops...but i have heard time and time again where people put the loop over a standard ball on the hitch and try to tug someone out.

a ball hitch is not able to stand the shock and energy from the recover strap when it stretches and then snaps back....the ball can be ripped clean off and becomes a projectile in a giant sling shot, which is just as dangerous of not more, as a tow strap with a metal hook.

if you buy a strap with no metal hooks, you dont solve anything if your method of attaching to the vehicles is faulty.....

as stated above....towing and recovery are not the same.....and make sure whereever you hook it to the vehicle, if you are using a recovery strap, your hooks or loops are rated for "recovery".....not all tow hooks are......i think most mopar hooks are but....the hooks you some times see in receiver hitches may not be.
If your hooks is not recovery rated i wouldn't suggest using a recovery strap. keep then in mind before you offer to pull some one else out...their vehicle hooks may not stand up and your vehicle my get drilled when the other guy's tow hooks come flying off. and you were trying to be the nice guy and help them out and you end up having the damage or getting hurt.

I know this think can happen because my brothers ford pickup had a tow loop ripped clean off the frame a few years back.

I am not as big of a fan of the "recovery" (stretchy) straps cause some many people like to hit the strap with a lot of speed.....its works good if all the parts are rated for it and you are really really stuck......but when possible i prefer to use towing straps and gently take the tension out by slowing moving the pulling vehicle forward, taking out all slack, and then using a stead pull with no jerking. I usually have the stuck vehicle already in gear and helping with the wheels turning as the pulling vehicles eases into the tow.
This is just my experiences. i have seen a lot of log chains and straps break so this is my prefered method.

i also carry axle straps for helping those vehicle with no tow hooks or loops. the straps are usually able to go around the body of the axle or part of the frame and give you some where to hook into with a d ring.


I ran across this photo that is exactly what i was talking about above....I wouldnt use this method of hooking for the extraction of a vehicle....especially if you have revcovery strap ( stretchy kind).
 

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I have always used normal tow straps with the loop end for vehicle recovery and have not had any problems. The one i have now is a 3 inch by 20 foot long but I think I might upgrade to a 3 inch by 30 foot. Sometimes it just doesnt seem like the one i have is long enough.
 

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I have something similar with the D-ring attached. That way you dont have to worry about the tow strap coming off.
I also have the "D" ring style and feel it is much safer than a hook.

 
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