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I was just thinking that when I had the plugs changed on my '06 Limited Hemi I never even thought about the wires. I looked in the maintenance log and it never calls for wire changes in either the "A" or "B" schedule. Are they lifetime wires or do they need to be replaced? Cheers.
 

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Nope... because there are no wires. They're coil packs now directly connected to the plugs.
Cool beans! Thanks, Matt. Cheers.
 

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I am happy no wires to change. 16 plugs is plenty work already
 

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Nope... because there are no wires. They're coil packs now directly connected to the plugs.
I never thought of this until this post. Thank you. :icon_cheers:
 

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Boots can still degrade and cause problems, I'd clean them, inspect them every spark plug change, if they look ragged, I'd replace them.

Look for a part of the boot becoming brittle and spongy, I have had this on other motors, that is what happens either from heat damage or the spark leaking/shorting through the boot. If you have that, you could get misfires from the spark shorting through the boot.

For those with 3.7L and 4.7L, there are 3 kinds of ignition cable. The 2 used for street vehicles are Resistive Core and Suppressive Core. The ignition cable has to suppress the EMI/RFI from the spark or it will mess up the electronics.

Resistive Core is Carbon impreggnated latex at the center of the cable, to make it one big long flexible resister to prevent the EMI/RFI. The conductor degrades with use and time and has to be replaced when it degrades enough to effect the ignition. I believe this is the type of wire the Commander uses, since the schedule calls to periodically replace it for the 3.7L and 4.7L.

The Suppressive Core wires are newer technology, they use a solid metal wire that is wrapped in a tight spiral through the whole length of the cable, it operates like a dynamic coil to suppress the EMI/RFI. Since its solid metal, the conductor doesn't degrade with use or time, anymore than regular wire. These types of ignition cable can last the life of the vehicle easily. My 2002 mini-van came with these cables OEM (and the maintenance schedule never called for changing wires), which surprises me why the more advanced 3.7L and 4.7L come with the older Resistive Cables, but the more rudimentary 3.3L and 3.8L come with the more advanced Suppressive Cable.

Solid metal wires, are used for racing, they can't be used for any vehicles with electronics in them because the electronics will get messed up. Some do use shielding over the metal wires, but if the shielding slips and lets some EMI/RFI leak out, it can cause the vehicle to stall and die right in the race.
 
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