Jeep Commander Forum banner

1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Moderator
Joined
·
2,248 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Today I changed all of my fluids to synthetic. It took most of the day and as part of the change over I added a drain plug to the transmission pan. I also used a sending unit for my transmission temp gauge instead of the plug.

I had trouble finding a place to do the transmission part of this so I talked a muffler shop guy into doing it today as he was not busy.

I took pictures of the transmission process, the other fluids were pretty simple.

There is no need to remove any of the skid plates to remove the transmission pan.




the pan removed and on the workbench



The inside of the pan, note the round magnet at the bottom of the picture. This is included in your pan to capture metal shavings, be sure to clean it well.

 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
2,248 Posts
Discussion Starter #2 (Edited)
I choose to drill and place the drain plug in the back of the pan where it is protected from being hit by rocks or other trail hazards.

I started with a small pilot hole.



I finished after using three bits with a 1/2 inch hole



The two piece drain plug assembly has a plastic washer between the two sections.



The other side of the assembly.



Showing the sending unit used in place of the drain plug.

 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
2,248 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
I reused the thin rubber gasket as it was in perfect shape. To make sure I added a line of RTV.




The underside of the transmission.



Close up of the magnet placed back in the pan.



View showing the placement of the magnet.

 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
2,248 Posts
Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
Here is a comparision of the drain plug and the transmission temp sender that I installed instead of the drain plug. I like to monitor the transmission temp in the pan.



The pan installed with the sleeve for the sending wire.



I routed the wire up and thru a hole next to the transmission and then up to the firewall and on to the gauge.
I was careful to avoid the exhaust or the turning driveshaft.

 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,337 Posts
Where did you mount the gauge?
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
2,248 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
In a Carbon Fiber Pod on the left side of the dash along with a Vacuum Gauge.



I showed where to drill thru the firewall and the dash top on a pervious thread.

 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
12,578 Posts
Nice job, I always like the threads that include step by step photos.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,789 Posts
That's some nice detailed stuff right there. Thanks for sharing!!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
128 Posts
-Thread Revival -

First off, nice setup! Love the install! But I was wondering if there was another way to measure transmission temp. w/o drillin into the pan (the wife gets nervous when I have power tools around vehicles). I wanna add a temp guage for all the towing we do.
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
2,248 Posts
Discussion Starter #11 (Edited)
You can also install a temperature sending unit in a tee inserted in one of the lines that run to the cooler. The line running from the transmission to the cooler would show the highest temps, but it is up to you. You would want to establish a normal temp for either location and then you would know if it is running hot. Also be sure that the "Tee" does not obstruct the flow of fluid in the line. I did the pan because it is a real mess to drain the transmission without a drain plug to first drain most of the fluid. The only drawback it that some mechanic in the future may take the shortcut of not removing the pan when changing the fluid. That is really an oversight function that you need to address.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,124 Posts
I've always wondered why cars in general don't come with drains for the tranny, maybe to make you change the tranny filter at the same time? My Great Uncle worked for a local Ford dealership for many years and I occasionally ask him for advice. I remember taking my old E150 conversion van to Firestone for some work, they had to lift the engine and busted some kind of filter attached to the tranny cooler line (it looked like a small fuel filter, black???) replaced with a similar looking filter and sent me on my way. I had all kinds of problems after that, the clutches were slipping, etc. My great uncle came by, showed him the prob and we ended up canceling the filter, taking off the output side of the tranny hose going to the cooler and flushing the system while the engine was running, the few first quarts coming out were black. It's a two man job and several quarts of tranny oil, but easy flush and the van ran great after that. I'm sure there was damage done but luckily enough I was given more in the trade-in for my Commander than what I had actually paid!!! (I also got a full refund from firestone after showing them the replacement filter they put on and a water bottle full of black tranny fluid):)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,037 Posts
I've always wondered why cars in general don't come with drains for the tranny, maybe to make you change the tranny filter at the same time?
Actually, some manufacturers do put drain plugs in their transmission oil pans. My ex got a Scion and it does have a drain plug and it did make changing the oil and filter much easier and neater.

I think its the combination of cost savings and forcing mechanics/owners to properly service the trans. I.e. remove the pan to replace the filter and clean out the pan and magnet, as well inspect for excessive clutch material (which indicates problems that need to be corrected).

I'm sure there was damage done but luckily enough I was given more in the trade-in for my Commander than what I had actually paid!!! (I also got a full refund from firestone after showing them the replacement filter they put on and a water bottle full of black tranny fluid):)
Actually, a proper operating/shifting transmission can have the clutch material in it last for a long, long time. Its when a transmission starts to malfunction and the owner doesn't get it fixed, then it burns up all the clutch material. So if you correct the problem, and get it back to proper operation, it may still last a very long time on what clutch material remains.
In a Carbon Fiber Pod on the left side of the dash along with a Vacuum Gauge.
I went with the individual Gauge Cups in the same location. I considered the carbon fiber Gauge Pod, and your install looks very cool.

6 of one, a half dozen of another, The gauge cups will be smaller and less intrusive, but also NOT as neat and are a bit harder to install (well at least looking neat and clean). The only drawback on the pod is its larger, NOT that its big enough that it impedes visibility in anyway, its just looks like something bigger on the top of the dash then 2 or 3 gauge cups. So it really comes down to personal preference, just like the type of gauge, I went with analog needle gauges instead of digital, again personal preference.
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top