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Discussion Starter #1
I did a search, didn't find anything on this.
Has anyone removed the plastic engine cover (5.7) and all the other plastic crap under the hood? Looks so cluttered and who knows how much heat the engine cover holds in. The intake baffle takes up a lot of room too but I do know that will need to be replaced with a CAI if removed.
 

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I have a tendency to remove all that stuff on my cars.

This is why I'm interested in removing the intakeresonator/black box/baffle thing that your talking about also.

I would do it if I were you. You might consider the shorty plug wires mod as well.
 

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The only functional purposes the cover performs, I've been told is too reduce underhood noise. I think its mostly there to sell cars on the dealer lot, most drivers have no idea about the mechanical workings of their car and the only time they ever open the hood is when they look at it at the dealership, thus they would be very impressed by a plastic faux cover.

The baffled black box is there too reduce induction noise of the motor, again probably an advantage to eleminate it, provided you have something suitable to use in its place, with the only drawback being some induction noise.

Retained heat? I don't know, the intake is already plastic, and arguably removing the cover will allow some convective cooling, but my guess is you'd be splitting hairs, you wouldn't see any measurable or noticeable gain from loosing the covers.
 

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The only functional purposes the cover performs, I've been told is too reduce underhood noise. I think its mostly there to sell cars on the dealer lot, most drivers have no idea about the mechanical workings of their car and the only time they ever open the hood is when they look at it at the dealership, thus they would be very impressed by a plastic faux cover.

The baffled black box is there too reduce induction noise of the motor, again probably an advantage to eleminate it, provided you have something suitable to use in its place, with the only drawback being some induction noise.

Retained heat? I don't know, the intake is already plastic, and arguably removing the cover will allow some convective cooling, but my guess is you'd be splitting hairs, you wouldn't see any measurable or noticeable gain from loosing the covers.
I wouldn't be surprised if a lot of that was intended to discourage shadetree mechanics as well.
 

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I wouldn't be surprised if a lot of that was intended to discourage shadetree mechanics as well.
Perhaps, but the legitimate things they are discouraging shade tree mechanics on, like servicing the NAG1 trans yourself, since it is very sensative to overfill, they remove the dipstick and replace it with a cap that says "Dealer Serviced Only".

Every manufacturer is putting these plastic covers on their engines, and perhaps in the reasoning for spending the money to do it, the idea of discouraging shade tree mechanics come up as well as reducing engine noise, protecting dirt build up in some areas, etc. and I still suspect the biggest factor is the stylist and marketing people getting together and showing an underhood picture of the vehicle without the plastic covers and arguing, "Our testing/polling shows, for the majority of consumers, when they open the hood at the dealership, while deciding to buy the vehicle, they are more likely to buy when the see the picture with the plastic covers on the engine."

Blame it on the ignorance of automotive consumers, I garuantee if the marketing research showed that a majority of consumers reponded like you and I do, when they saw those covers, saying, "why in the world do you put some stupid plastic cover on the engine to dress it up? who are you trying to fool?" The covers wouldn't be there.

The manufacturers didn't get away with exploiting consumer ignorance on the RFID ignition keys. A couple years back, several manufacturers, including Chrysler, went to all RFID ignition keys, and hoping that consumer ignorance would let them get away with charging 2000%-6000% profit on replacement keys. They suffered a backlash from consumers threatening to never buy their cars again if they can expect get stuck and have to pay $500 or $600 for a replacement key. Noticehow all the manufacturers have gone back to offering cars without the RFID keys, and the prices on the keys have dropped drastically although they are still insanely high.

The manufacturers still get away with keeping their electronic module software proprietary because of consumer ignorance. There is absolutely no reason why someone would be forced to go to a Dealership to have electronic diagnostics or electronically controlled maintenance procedures done. But, all the manufacturers design the systems and their tools that way and keep the information proprietary just to keep an inflated revenue stream to themselves and their dealerships. If consumers really understood that every shop or themselves could have tools that read every diagnostic code and perform every electronic controlled procedure at a very reasonable cost (granted some procedures should have a flashing warning saying, "If you don't know what your doing you could damage the vehicle"), there would be an uproar, but there is NOT, because most people don't even realize it and just assume that the Dealerships have these super smart, highly trained techs that they have no other choice to bring their vehicles too, when its totally untrue.
 

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Perhaps, but the legitimate things they are discouraging shade tree mechanics on, like servicing the NAG1 trans yourself, since it is very sensative to overfill, they remove the dipstick and replace it with a cap that says "Dealer Serviced Only".

Every manufacturer is putting these plastic covers on their engines, and perhaps in the reasoning for spending the money to do it, the idea of discouraging shade tree mechanics come up as well as reducing engine noise, protecting dirt build up in some areas, etc. and I still suspect the biggest factor is the stylist and marketing people getting together and showing an underhood picture of the vehicle without the plastic covers and arguing, "Our testing/polling shows, for the majority of consumers, when they open the hood at the dealership, while deciding to buy the vehicle, they are more likely to buy when the see the picture with the plastic covers on the engine."

Blame it on the ignorance of automotive consumers, I garuantee if the marketing research showed that a majority of consumers reponded like you and I do, when they saw those covers, saying, "why in the world do you put some stupid plastic cover on the engine to dress it up? who are you trying to fool?" The covers wouldn't be there.

The manufacturers didn't get away with exploiting consumer ignorance on the RFID ignition keys. A couple years back, several manufacturers, including Chrysler, went to all RFID ignition keys, and hoping that consumer ignorance would let them get away with charging 2000%-6000% profit on replacement keys. They suffered a backlash from consumers threatening to never buy their cars again if they can expect get stuck and have to pay $500 or $600 for a replacement key. Noticehow all the manufacturers have gone back to offering cars without the RFID keys, and the prices on the keys have dropped drastically although they are still insanely high.

The manufacturers still get away with keeping their electronic module software proprietary because of consumer ignorance. There is absolutely no reason why someone would be forced to go to a Dealership to have electronic diagnostics or electronically controlled maintenance procedures done. But, all the manufacturers design the systems and their tools that way and keep the information proprietary just to keep an inflated revenue stream to themselves and their dealerships. If consumers really understood that every shop or themselves could have tools that read every diagnostic code and perform every electronic controlled procedure at a very reasonable cost (granted some procedures should have a flashing warning saying, "If you don't know what your doing you could damage the vehicle"), there would be an uproar, but there is NOT, because most people don't even realize it and just assume that the Dealerships have these super smart, highly trained techs that they have no other choice to bring their vehicles too, when its totally untrue.
I'm sure your on to something there,

And we certainly (as mentioned in your sig) know that the inflated revenue stream situation is certainly a big part of some decisions as well.

:)
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Took off the engine cover today. Oh man, good thing I did. First off, it was totally nasty under there. That cover hides a lot of dirt and grime. Then while I took the engine cover off I noticed the TB coupler was loose. When I took it off I discovered that the bottom edge of the coupler was folded over not allowing it to seal to the TB and partially blocking the opening. And to be expected, there was dust all over the throttle blade. Also discovered tons of buildup of funk on the backside of the throttle blade. So tomorrow, it will be getting a thorough cleaning with some TB cleaner. Gotta love used vehicles. Looks like someone was not paying attention or just didn't know what the heck they were doing when working on it. I think the coupler is toast. After so many heat cycles I think it's permanently folded. I wonder how much power it killed as well as MPG...
Time to upgrade to a CAI I guess.
 

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Took off the engine cover today. Oh man, good thing I did. First off, it was totally nasty under there. That cover hides a lot of dirt and grime. Then while I took the engine cover off I noticed the TB coupler was loose. When I took it off I discovered that the bottom edge of the coupler was folded over not allowing it to seal to the TB and partially blocking the opening. And to be expected, there was dust all over the throttle blade. Also discovered tons of buildup of funk on the backside of the throttle blade. So tomorrow, it will be getting a thorough cleaning with some TB cleaner. Gotta love used vehicles. Looks like someone was not paying attention or just didn't know what the heck they were doing when working on it. I think the coupler is toast. After so many heat cycles I think it's permanently folded. I wonder how much power it killed as well as MPG...
Time to upgrade to a CAI I guess.
Good thing you pulled that off!
 

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Found a whole nest behind my engine made of leaves and dried pine needles behind my engine when I pulled the cover to do spark plugs.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Nice and toasty place for a nest!!

I haven't even found the spark plugs yet. I have a feeling that is going to be a nightmare changing those out...:scratchhead:
 
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