Jeep Commander Forum banner

81 - 100 of 119 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,262 Posts
Regarding fluid capacity 07, I believe you are correct.
Most published capacities are for initial fill of a new or rebuilt assembly.

The manufacturer usually also has a published full point.
For example, the 1/4 inch below fill/check hole is considered the full point.
Final drive units though generally don't seem affected if slightly overfilled and the discussion/concern rarely comes up.

Rob
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
111 Posts
I think that information that was posted was wrong. The Transfer Case doesnt take Full Synthetic ATF. It uses the Mopar ONLY fluid you were refering to. As for the Transmission im not sure as I have not messed with mine yet. I swapped out the T-Case fluid at 30,000 miles and it still looked brand new.
Just did mine today at 30,350 and it looked as clean and new as the fluid I put in...Felt like I wasted time and money, but it's required to keep warranty..rip off I suspect
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
111 Posts
Reference the transfer case capacity of the QT2. One poster says
Transfer Case- 3.5 QTS fully synthetic ATF+4. And another poster says TRANSFER CASE

NV140 (QT-I) : 0.65L (1.4 pts.)
NV245 (QT-II & QD-II): 1.8L (3.8 pts.)

So who is correct? I did mine today and it took lest than 2 quarts. I stopped when it began to overfill. If you pump to fast it will began to overfill on the first quart and make you think it's full. Someone said 10 minutes...HA..it took me longer than that to get all my stuff together, find the plugs and proceed to stain my concrete...Gawd I hate that. Oh well, it's done..tomorrow the differentials..then I'm good to go for a couple of years not counting oil changes..Damn, I love this beast.
HT
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,352 Posts
I filled up both my diffs and the T case until fluid started dripping from the fill hole ... I just could not bear to have less fluid in them than that.

That was a few months ago and no troubles
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
343 Posts
Ok, about to do my 50k service soon. Went to Meijer and picked up 12qts of Valvoline ATF +4, from what I've read, this is the best to use. Then went to advance auto and picked up M1 75-140 gear oil at $20 a quart. I plan on changing both diffs and the transmission oil.

I know its not possible to get all the trans fluid out, but is there a way to get out more than whats in the pan.

Also does the what fluid does the transfer case use???
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
282 Posts
I have a concern regarding the tranny fill spec. It was stated that normal tranny service (QD2) would require 6.5 quarts, both here and in my manual. I put in 6 and warmed it up, showed low, so I added half a quart, still showed low.. I have now put in all 7 quarts on the refill and it's still showing about half way between the cold and hot marks on the stick. And this was after 100 mile drive so it *should* have been plenty warm.

I am checking the level with the engine idling and tranny in neutral. As far as I recall, this is the proper method for checking tranny level; it even states this procedure on the dipstick.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,352 Posts
I have a concern regarding the tranny fill spec. It was stated that normal tranny service (QD2) would require 6.5 quarts, both here and in my manual. I put in 6 and warmed it up, showed low, so I added half a quart, still showed low.. I have now put in all 7 quarts on the refill and it's still showing about half way between the cold and hot marks on the stick. And this was after 100 mile drive so it *should* have been plenty warm.

I am checking the level with the engine idling and tranny in neutral. As far as I recall, this is the proper method for checking tranny level; it even states this procedure on the dipstick.
That's a tough one ... peronaly I'd 'go by' the dipstick
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
1,993 Posts
Ok, about to do my 50k service soon. Went to Meijer and picked up 12qts of Valvoline ATF +4, from what I've read, this is the best to use. Then went to advance auto and picked up M1 75-140 gear oil at $20 a quart. I plan on changing both diffs and the transmission oil.

I know its not possible to get all the trans fluid out, but is there a way to get out more than whats in the pan.

Also does the what fluid does the transfer case use???
the only was to get all the fluid out of the transmission is to do a flush or drop the tranny. The easiest way to do that is let some one else do it. Or get creative you will need to disconnect the cooling lines put the inlet one in fresh fluid and the out let into a bucket and idle the engine until the fluid coming out looks like the fluid going in. I would just pay the money they have a machine that does this for you in like 6 minuets. Oh if you do try this your going to have to put your new fluid in a big bucket!! to be sucked out of please rig a filter of some kind to your inlet hose.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
43 Posts
Oh, also, I read one of your older posts and you said that the factory Mopar diff. oils ARE snthetic----did I read that right? Also, you said that in our QTII's (I think that's what I have, lol) They DO have to add some kind of additive in the rear diff. Here is a pic of my service paperwork. I do not speak "stealer", so could someone tell me, if in fact, itr is noted that this extra additive was added? Also, I am wondering why in the hell they did not change the front!!??

I know this is an old thread, but I picked up a bottle of friction modifier yesterday. 4318060AB is the part #.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
43 Posts
Also I changed my transfer case fluid today, it only took just shy of a quart to refill. I didn't realize the transfer case was so small.

That would be the 140J New Process transfer case, and the 3.7 liter V6.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,037 Posts
I've read in numerous places that ATF+4 is Synthetic ATF, you would think that they would advertise that on the bottle.

Shop different dealerships, like service and parts, some have outrageous mark-ups on products, some have reasonable mark-ups. OR Just get ATF+4 at the local auto store, its the same thing.

From what I understand, Friction Modifier reduces the "Slipperiness" of the Oil so that the clutches and friction surfaces can engage faster and smoother. It only reduces it slightly and NOT enough to really compromise the oil.

*So, if you added Friction Modifier and didn't need it, do NOT worry, it does NOT reduce "slipperness" to a level that should worry you at all.

*If you don't need Friction Modifier, don't use it, as well as a waste of money, it can only help to have slippery oil for differentials that do NOT have frictions surfaces or clutches.

*If you do need Friction Modifier, DO USE IT, the ELSD has clutches in it and without the friction modifier they will NOT engage properly and NOT only will the ELSD NOT work properly, likely the clutches will wear out much quicker.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,037 Posts
What I learned draining and flushing my Power Steering.

Power Steering:
Service Fill: <1 Quart (guessing 24 ounces) MS-10383 (only available from the Dealer)

This was in a 2010 w/ 3.7L and QTI system. It does have a PS Cooler and do believe all Commanders have the same system, BUT I'm NOT positive on that.

I used several ounces to flush with fresh fluid and spill some too. The point was, I bought 2 quarts of fluid and only needed 1 quart total, even with a flush and spilling it. Considering it costs $15-$30 a quart only from the dealer, NOT having to buy a 2nd quart, if you can avoid it, is worth while.

[EDIT] I have since learned the HEMI Commanders have a Hydraulically Driven Radiator Fan, the Hydraulic power comes from the Power Steering system. As I understand it, its just an additional hydrualic circuit off the PS system. Logically, this would increase the volume of the PS system and you likely will need more than 1 quart of PS fluid to flush and replace all the fluid, I'm guessing and do NOT know the actual amounts.

Also, logically, this extra hydrualic driven fan would add to the stress on the PS fluid, so I would give even more weight to the consideration of changing PS fluid eventually on your Commander if you have the Hydrualic fan.

Also, and I'm really go out on a limb here, since the Commander specifies a new PS fluid, NOT avialable aftermarket yet, I "wonder" if it is because of the hydrualic fan and just for simplicity sake they fill all commanders with the same fluid, i.e. if you don't have the hydrualic fan you could use the older spec, more common PS Fluid. I could be very wrong on that, and considering the cost of replacing a PS system on a Commander, I would play it safe and just get the specified fluid, i.e. pay more for it at the dealer.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,037 Posts
What I learned bleeding and flushing my Brakes.

Brake System:
Flush the System by Bleeding: 1.5 Quart DOT3 (NOT including ABS Pump)

Does NOT include ABS, you'll need a dealer tool to operate the ABS pump to bleed it, new fluid will circulate into the pump when the ABS operates, so its reasonable to flush the system and NOT take it to the dealer to flush the ABS pump, eventually fresh fluid will work its way through. I can't imagine the ABS pump trapping more than a few ounces of fluid.

Remember, DOT4 has a higher dry boiling point, but a lower wet boiling point than DOT3, DOT4 absorbs moisture faster than DOT3. If the vehicle specs call for DOT3, its better to use DOT3 than DOT4.

I use Castrol GTLMA, its a different formulation, they call it synthetic, but its synthetic like a lot of oils sold over the counter are synthetic, it is easier on the seals and parts, performs better than DOT4 and absorbs moisture slower than DOT3, its the best of all worlds for just a couple bucks more.

This was in a 2010 w/ 3.7L and QTI system. I believe all Commanders have the same brake system, BUT I'm NOT positive on that.

I installed Speed Bleeders, Bleeder Screw Size:
*M10-1.0, 31.35mm length (Front and Rear)
*Speed Bleeder part num SB1010S
*Russell part num RUS-639630

My preferance for bleeding the brakes, makes it much quicker and easier, never got air in the system using these and it only takes one person to do the whole job. There are other ways to bleed brakes and different people have different preferences.

Unlike the Power Steering, I bought only 1 Quart of Brake Fluid and had to go back and get a 2nd Quart. You'll need to purchase 2 quarts to do this job, you'll have some left over to keep on the shelf.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6,309 Posts
What I learned draining and flushing my Power Steering.

Power Steering:
Service Fill: <1 Quart (guessing 24 ounces) MS-10383 (only available from the Dealer)

This was in a 2010 w/ 3.7L and QTI system. It does have a PS Cooler and do believe all Commanders have the same system, BUT I'm NOT positive on that.

I used several ounces to flush with fresh fluid and spill some too. The point was, I bought 2 quarts of fluid and only needed 1 quart total, even with a flush and spilling it. Considering it costs $15-$30 a quart only from the dealer, NOT having to buy a 2nd quart, if you can avoid it, is worth while.
Just curious why you flushed the Power Steering fluid on a new 2010 XK?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,352 Posts
I bought only 1 Quart of Brake Fluid and had to go back and get a 2nd Quart. You'll need to purchase 2 quarts to do this job, you'll have some left over to keep on the shelf.
I keep half container of break fluid myself all the time ... but the manufactures don't recommend it .. they all say to open a FRESH container.

What about you guys? Do you use Break Fluid from a partial container?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6,309 Posts
I've used an open bottle of brake fluid before without any problems. My father and brother are both mechanics and do it all the time.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,037 Posts
Brake Fluid is Hygoscopic, meaning it absorbs moisture and will suck it right out of the air, and suck it through plastic and rubber, which if you didn't know, plastic and rubber is NOT 100% impermiable, meaning over time a little air and moisture can work its way through the plastic or rubber container/hose/barrier.

The moisture it absorbs, can start rust in the brake system if it absorb enough of it, as well as lower the boiling point of the fluid, if the brakes get hot enough, the fluid will boil sooner and brake fluid steam compress's, meaning when you push on the brake pedal you won't get any braking, all the pressure is being absorbed by the compressing brake fluid steam.

That is why they do NOT recommend keeping brake fluid on the shelf, as it sits there it will absorb moisture through the seals on the bottle and plastic.

Metal containers are imperimaible, so I've seen recommendations that is OK to keep brake fluid on the shelf, if its in a metal container with a good sealing cap. They are expensive, so you don't see brake fluid come in metal containers that often.

Keep in mind, the brake fluid on the shelf is absorbing moisture no faster than it does in the brake system of your car. If you're flushing the brake fluid to completely replace it with fresh fluid, and keeping the left over in the bottle on shelf, in case you need to top off, I think that is fine. As long you get new fluid when you're going to flush out the system again, and throw out any old left over and keep the new left over for top off.

Just curious why you flushed the Power Steering fluid on a new 2010 XK?
Again, its arguably overkill this early. BUT, many new Power Systems are increasingly demanding on their fluid, as evidenced by newer and newer fluid specs and specialized PS Fluids for new PS Systems and increasing number of PS component failures in new vehicles.

I've seen some info, stating some of the newer Jeep Designs are suffering PS failures, and the fact the Commander specifies a brand new fluid Spec MS-10383, over and above the latest and fairly new PS specs for other Chrysler Vehicles, it would "seem" the Commander has PS system that is even more high stress then those already out there.

At least for this initial change, the new from the dealer (MS-10383) is as clear as water, but the 1 year old fluid in the vehicle came out as black as coal. Yes, I know, you can't really judge the condition of a fluid by its appearance, but I do find it alarming it changes that drastically within one year of use.

Next year, I'll change the fluid again and see how it looks, if its looks as bad as it did this time, I may continue to do it every year.
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
1,993 Posts
As far as amounts are concerned I followed the SM and put pretty much right down to the ounce what the manual called for and all the fluid in the diffs and TC are sitting right below the refill hole. I also used teflon tape on the drain plugs. Another thing I did do to lack of service records with my XK was I removed the fill plug first just to make sure I could get it out my oil plug when I first got it was almost stuck on just a precaution.

This is the Transfer case oil I used
Wynn’s Synthetic
Transfer Case/Manual Transmission Fluid
Part Number 66303 - (6 x 64 oz case)


Formulated for use in all transfer case and manual transmission applications specifying ATF or GL-1 thru GL-4 gear oils. In addition, this fluid is recommended for use in the following OEM specific applications:

GM P/N 12345349
Ford P/N D80Z19C547A and ESRY 19C547
Chrysler P/N 4773167
Mercedes-Benz P/N 900260315
This is what the local shop had so I picked it up it was almost $40 bucks so I'm assuming by the price its a pretty good product:ugh2:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
I am definitely going to sound pretty new by asking ..again, but here goes.

We have a 2006 Commander 5.7L 4wd and want to change the fluids and keep finding different capacities for some of the fluids. Here is what I am looking for:

Front diff - 1.5 qts
Rear diff - 2.5 qts

T Case - MOPAR Only as I have read - 3.5qts

Transmission - ATF +4 only 6.5 qts

Are my amounts correct?

What are thoughts on types of fluids to use for the above items? I see some using full synthetic, some using it with an additive, some using the MOPAR versions rather than aftermarket, etc.

I am just trying to gather the thoughts into one post rather than me see several different options and capacities through multiple posts.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,037 Posts
I am definitely going to sound pretty new by asking ..again, but here goes.

We have a 2006 Commander 5.7L 4wd and want to change the fluids and keep finding different capacities for some of the fluids. Here is what I am looking for:

Front diff - 1.5 qts
Rear diff - 2.5 qts

T Case - MOPAR Only as I have read - 3.5qts

Transmission - ATF +4 only 6.5 qts

Are my amounts correct?

What are thoughts on types of fluids to use for the above items? I see some using full synthetic, some using it with an additive, some using the MOPAR versions rather than aftermarket, etc.

I am just trying to gather the thoughts into one post rather than me see several different options and capacities through multiple posts.
Check your owners manual, it should list all the capacities for you vehicle. If you don't have one, you can download one for free from Jeep's website.

The capacity will vary from year to year and what equipment/options you have.

Front Diff is 57.5oz or 1Qt 25.5oz or 1.8Qt
Rear Diff is 76oz or 2Qt 12oz or 2.4Qt

Both combined is 127.5oz or just a half oz short of a gallon.

Transfer Case, the Commander has two different ones. The NV140 for the QT1 Commanders is just short of a whole QT and uses ATF+4. The other transfer case, go with what your O.M. says, check for a TSB, I think Chrysler switched the fluid for it, to a special Dealer fluid that helps it engage better with less noise.

Transmission, varies with what trans you have, with a 545RFE, I think the 6.5 Qt sounds right, but check your O.M., the proper way to service it to drop the pan and replace whats in the pan with the filter, NOT all the fluid. So you're just going to refill till you hit the proper level in the trans, that typically will be 6.5QT in the 545RFE, it may be a little more or less.
 
81 - 100 of 119 Posts
Top