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Discussion Starter #1
Tell me about your favorites, any recommendations, any to avoid?

As near as I can tell, our 2006 Commander had Akebono ceramic pads installed at the factory. Not sure what's on it now, but they've worn out and started grinding on the rotor. So it's time for rotors and pads.

For pads, I was thinking Bendix CT-3 (part # D1080CT). They have wear indicator (scrapers), and they are in the $40-$45 range on Amazon.

I also considered the Wagner ThermoQuiet ceramic pads (part # QC1181). Same price range, but those have no wear indicators, and they don't include the hardware with them. New hardware adds a few bucks, and the lack of any kind of wear indicator is a negative in my opinion.

If the Akebonos are that much better, I might consider them, but I'm seeing prices around $60+ for the Akebono ceramic sets.
 

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Using wearever platinum ceramic. Very little dust and quiet.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I ordered the Bendix pad set yesterday on Amazon. It should be here tomorrow.

For rotors, I got some Dura-Go rotors from RockAuto with the black EP coating on the hats, vanes, other non-friction surfaces. Seems like all the local parts stores only carry Chinese rotors these days. I'm not even sure if the Mopar rotors from the $tealership are US made (probably made in Mexico, or maybe even theirs are Chinese).

I was surprised that even with shipping (not insignificant on brake rotors, they are heavy), Rock Auto and Amazon beat the locals on this set of rotors.
 

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Just put on the Wagner OEX1181 for $40 shipped from ebay. They have a big campaign about better stopping distance, etc. They are better than the half-used old ones but a real brake system upgrade is needed on these cars.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Pads and rotors arrived. Pads arrived Wednesday, rotors on Thursday.

Today, I installed new rotor and pads on the passenger side. Old pads weren't completely gone yet, still showing groove in the pad material. I'd guess about 3/16" of material left on the pads.

The rubber O-ring got me on pulling the rotor off, until I did a little research and figured out it was there.

I moved to the driver's side. Trouble there. The outer pad looked great, hardly worn at all. The inner pad was on the backing plate. That's the grinding noise I was hearing.

I generally try to start pushing the pistons back when I'm disassembling the thing. I push the old inner pad away from the rotor, sliding a screw driver or pry bar between the rotor vanes, pushing it against the inner pad by prying against the caliper housing. I'll try to get a pic. It makes it easier to get the stuff apart, and you can actually push the pistons most of the way in that way, minimizing the work later to get them all the way in. Well, the lower piston won't budge. Nothing will make the thing move.

I take the caliper off, and sure enough, it doesn't look good. The lower piston is exposed, the dust cap is torn half way around it.

I've ordered new pistons, seal kit and new caliper pins and boots for the caliper pins. Got all that online (thanks, RockAuto). I'll call the local places tomorrow, see if I can get the same stuff locally quicker. If I end up with two sets, I'll pull the passenger side caliper again and freshen it up as well. It didn't look bad, but it won't hurt. Parts were under $30 from RA, including shipping.

So Sir (that's our Commander's name) is parked for a day or two waiting on even more brake parts.
 

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Pads and rotors arrived. Pads arrived Wednesday, rotors on Thursday.

Today, I installed new rotor and pads on the passenger side. Old pads weren't completely gone yet, still showing groove in the pad material. I'd guess about 3/16" of material left on the pads.

The rubber O-ring got me on pulling the rotor off, until I did a little research and figured out it was there.

I moved to the driver's side. Trouble there. The outer pad looked great, hardly worn at all. The inner pad was on the backing plate. That's the grinding noise I was hearing.

I generally try to start pushing the pistons back when I'm disassembling the thing. I push the old inner pad away from the rotor, sliding a screw driver or pry bar between the rotor vanes, pushing it against the inner pad by prying against the caliper housing. I'll try to get a pic. It makes it easier to get the stuff apart, and you can actually push the pistons most of the way in that way, minimizing the work later to get them all the way in. Well, the lower piston won't budge. Nothing will make the thing move.

I take the caliper off, and sure enough, it doesn't look good. The lower piston is exposed, the dust cap is torn half way around it.

I've ordered new pistons, seal kit and new caliper pins and boots for the caliper pins. Got all that online (thanks, RockAuto). I'll call the local places tomorrow, see if I can get the same stuff locally quicker. If I end up with two sets, I'll pull the passenger side caliper again and freshen it up as well. It didn't look bad, but it won't hurt. Parts were under $30 from RA, including shipping.

So Sir (that's our Commander's name) is parked for a day or two waiting on even more brake parts.
Here are some other links that may help you in the future Racer;

Cheapest factory Parts: Find OEM BMW, Fiat, Ford, GM, Mopar, Nissan, Subaru & Toyota Parts & Accessories

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Bilstein shocks & struts - Home

The Steel Armadillo - Jeep Commander (XK/HK) 2006-2010

Crawl Off-Road - https://crawloffroad.com/cart.php?ta...&category_id=3

WAM Custom Bumpers - https://wambumpers.com/

4WheelParts.com - Truck Parts & Jeep Parts - Lift Kits, Winches, Tonneau Covers, Tires, Wheels, Bumpers, Performance ? 4 Wheel Parts

RockAuto - http://www.rockauto.com/en/catalog/j...catalog%2Fjeep
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks for the links. I had a lot of those, but you brought up a few I didn't have yet. Also, I'll add a couple more and explain why they are useful even if you don't buy parts from these sources:

  • Search Jeep Commander Parts The link goes straight to Jeep Commander parts, but that's a Chrysler Dodge Jeep Ram dealership, and they have the entire parts catalog online. It's useful for a few things. Obviously, you can check the price for genuine parts to see if the savings are worth the risk of "off brands." You can also use it to keep your local dealership honest and avoid "matrix pricing." Less obvious, but more useful, you can get the original (Chrysler/Mopar) part # from there which will work with the "look up by part number" on other sites to bring up aftermarket alternatives.
  • ACDelco Parts Give it a Mopar/Chrysler part # (or Ford or GM part # for that matter) and it will give you ACDelco part #'s for the equivalent part from ACDelco. Again, you can use the number you get as a starting point for "search by part #" on other sites.
Those are helpful when you can't figure out where someone has hidden the part you're looking for on their website. Any decent website can turn part # from one of those two places into their own offerings for equivalent replacements. If they can't use those numbers, either they don't have what you're looking for, or they don't deserve your business because they can't help you find what you're looking for.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Just a quick update. The caliper parts came in Monday, and Tuesday morning this past week I rebuilt the front caliper (new pistons, seals, caliper pins and caliper pin boots, fresh grease in the caliper pin bores of the caliper frame). I'm know that phenolic material the pistons are made of isn't supposed to rust, and it's cheaper than stainless steel, but mine had some grainy, crusty stuff on it that seemed as abrasive as rust, and couldn't have been any better for the seal in the caliper bore.

I got it all back together Tuesday, and flushed the front system with fresh fluid, bleeding both sides until I had clear, fresh fluid coming through.

The pedal is firm (firmer than before, I think), and these Bendix CT-3 pads seem to perform a bit better than the mystery pads that were on it before (probably some cheap house brand from a parts place). The brake pedal is firm and the pads seem to grab a bit more with a bit less pedal effort than before. I'm not sure I had the factory pads before, so I'm not sure how they compare to what it had when new, but I'm satisfied with them so far, and the wife is happy, too.

Now, on to other projects, upgrades and mods.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Another (perhaps final) update on the brakes on our Commander (he's known simply as "Sir" in our family).

The wife came back from the store and some other errands today, and she said, "I don't know what you did to the brakes, but they feel really good. They're almost as good as the Mercedes now. I used to worry that Sir (that's the Commander's name) didn't stop very well, but now his brakes are as good as any of our cars."

Our other cars generally are (or were) running Hawk HPS pads or similar "street performance" brake pads on stock (-ish not drilled or slotted) rotors. The Mercedes (an older S class coupe) has Akebono Performance Ceramics on it now, and that's what she compares the Jeep to.

I can highly recommend the Bendix CT3 pads for this Jeep. They perform well and have been a real improvement for Sir. No noticeable dust (not that we really notice brake dust among the other dust from our gravel roads and driveways), and no brake noise so far. Definitely a step up from most cheap "house brand" pads, and probably at least comparable to or possibly even better than the original factory pads.
 

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I ordered the Bendix pad set yesterday on Amazon. It should be here tomorrow.

For rotors, I got some Dura-Go rotors from RockAuto with the black EP coating on the hats, vanes, other non-friction surfaces. Seems like all the local parts stores only carry Chinese rotors these days. I'm not even sure if the Mopar rotors from the $tealership are US made (probably made in Mexico, or maybe even theirs are Chinese).

I was surprised that even with shipping (not insignificant on brake rotors, they are heavy), Rock Auto and Amazon beat the locals on this set of rotors.

I'm in the market for brakes at the moment, how are the Dura-Go Rotors holding up. Do you have a part # for these? I've been searching for a good setup on my Commander so I'm just looking for reviews. Thanks
 

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I ordered the Bendix pad set yesterday on Amazon. It should be here tomorrow.

For rotors, I got some Dura-Go rotors from RockAuto with the black EP coating on the hats, vanes, other non-friction surfaces. Seems like all the local parts stores only carry Chinese rotors these days. I'm not even sure if the Mopar rotors from the $tealership are US made (probably made in Mexico, or maybe even theirs are Chinese).

I was surprised that even with shipping (not insignificant on brake rotors, they are heavy), Rock Auto and Amazon beat the locals on this set of rotors.
After giving some thought about how my Commander brakes when pulling my trailer, fully-loaded, I figured it was time to upgrade the factory brakes and I decided to go this route;

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...productDetails

Power Stop K2220-36 Front & Rear Z36 Truck and Tow Brake Kit;

Not cheap - but it looks to be a quality upgrade to the factory brakes and I don't mind paying for quality.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Gonna give those Bendix CT3 pads a shot. Where'd you find the best deal?
I got mine at RockAuto.com. Bendix D1080CT. They are on "wholesale closeout" with only 3 sets left. If you put "6869560248874231" in the "How Did You Hear About Us? " box, you'll get another 5% off before shipping. The pads are $32.10 plus shipping with that discount code.
After giving some thought about how my Commander brakes when pulling my trailer, fully-loaded, I figured it was time to upgrade the factory brakes and I decided to go this route;

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...productDetails

Power Stop K2220-36 Front & Rear Z36 Truck and Tow Brake Kit;

Not cheap - but it looks to be a quality upgrade to the factory brakes and I don't mind paying for quality.
I've run drilled and/or slotted rotors on race cars before. I've also won far more races with undrilled, unslotted "stock" rotors than I have with fancy drilled rotors.

I'd never put cross drilled on a truck. The down sides to drilled rotors are too steep for cross country towing in a truck (or Jeep). And that's with properly drilled rotors.

Those rotors look like dangerous junk to me. The drilling and slotting pattern is all wrong. I'm guessing the friction surface is coated with whatever zinc plating they put on them.

Good pads plus stock vented rotors will be plenty of "stopping power" for towing. The CT3's I used (hurry if you want them from Rock Auto) would be appropriate. Other choices I'd consider would be Akebono ASP1080 (not ACT1080) or Hawk Performance Ceramic HB558Z.710. I've driven both of those compounds on other fairly heavy cars, though not on the Jeep. Both compounds should deliver good braking performance on the Jeep.

Also I wouldn't tow or do anything where I expected to need good brake performance with the wheels shown in your signature picture. You need wheels with at least as much open air space as the stock wheels for the brakes to cool properly. That's even more important when towing.

Where I live, we have very hilly, very curvy roads, and I wouldn't consider those wheels at all for our Commander. I have some like that on my Chevy S10 pickup, and I have the absolute best pads I can find on that one, plus I drive it slowly (like a truck) because it usually has a bed full of merchandise or cargo I'm moving around.
 

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I got mine at RockAuto.com. Bendix D1080CT. They are on "wholesale closeout" with only 3 sets left. If you put "6869560248874231" in the "How Did You Hear About Us? " box, you'll get another 5% off before shipping. The pads are $32.10 plus shipping with that discount code.

I've run drilled and/or slotted rotors on race cars before. I've also won far more races with undrilled, unslotted "stock" rotors than I have with fancy drilled rotors.

I'd never put cross drilled on a truck. The down sides to drilled rotors are too steep for cross country towing in a truck (or Jeep). And that's with properly drilled rotors.

Those rotors look like dangerous junk to me. The drilling and slotting pattern is all wrong. I'm guessing the friction surface is coated with whatever zinc plating they put on them.

Good pads plus stock vented rotors will be plenty of "stopping power" for towing. The CT3's I used (hurry if you want them from Rock Auto) would be appropriate. Other choices I'd consider would be Akebono ASP1080 (not ACT1080) or Hawk Performance Ceramic HB558Z.710. I've driven both of those compounds on other fairly heavy cars, though not on the Jeep. Both compounds should deliver good braking performance on the Jeep.

Also I wouldn't tow or do anything where I expected to need good brake performance with the wheels shown in your signature picture. You need wheels with at least as much open air space as the stock wheels for the brakes to cool properly. That's even more important when towing.

Where I live, we have very hilly, very curvy roads, and I wouldn't consider those wheels at all for our Commander. I have some like that on my Chevy S10 pickup, and I have the absolute best pads I can find on that one, plus I drive it slowly (like a truck) because it usually has a bed full of merchandise or cargo I'm moving around.
I am aware of the airflow issues that my rims could potentially cause and I've heard it all before.

The FACT of the matter is - I have been towing with these rims for 3 years and I have never had an issue - because I know how to drive.

As far as the brake kit I ordered goes they are specifically designed for trucks and towing - this is straight from the product description;


  • Heavy Duty Truck and Tow Brake Kit includes Silver Zinc Plated Cross-Drilled and Slotted Rotors with Z36 Truck and Tow Brake Pads
  • Corrosion resistant silver zinc plating on Cross Drilled and Slotted Rotors
  • One-Click Brake Kit - Everything you need and pre-matched components ready to install
  • Recommended for Towing and Hauling
  • Components are engineered to work together
I appreciate your opinion Racer_X but I'm going to give them a shot - I'm pretty confident they will be an improvement over the stock brakes.
 

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Discussion Starter #16 (Edited)
Good luck with those rotors.

I'm sure everything the marketers of those rotors is absolutely true. It's on the Internet, so it must be true. Plus marketers and sales people always tell the absolute truth, all the time.

For anyone else reading this. The down side to drilled rotors (properly drilled ones) is that 1) they crack and 2) the pads wear very quickly.

Nothing can be done to prevent the cracking, although if the rotors are cast with the holes in the casting, that will lengthen the service life before the cracks get serious. In road racing conditions, back in the days when we needed drilled rotors because pad compounds weren't nearly as good as they are today, you could get 500 to 1,500 miles out of a set of drilled rotors before they had to be replaced. No, I didn't leave any zeros out of those numbers. There's a reason that endurance cars running drilled rotors change brake rotors half way through the 24 hours of Le Mans (or Daytona), it's because the rotors are going to fail before the end of the race. People who run drilled rotors on street cars can expect to get maybe ten times that distance, but rarely much more. Even more modern drilled rotors, like the ones on C6 and C7 Corvettes, will crack fairly quickly. I have a friend with a C6 Corvette, and she drives it like a little old lady, and she cracked a set of the stock drilled rotors in under 20,000 miles. She's got flat surface rotors on hers now, and better pads, and she's learning to drive it faster, too.

Pad wear is very bad on drilled rotors because, basically, you're pressing the pads against a spinning cheese grater every time you put the brakes on. If the drilling pattern is good, the wear is at least even across the pads. A good drilling pattern has every hole a different distance from the center of the rotor (and obviously, a different distance from the edge of the rotor). A good pattern also has holes from inside the innermost edge of the pad compound surface to just beyond the outer edge of the pad compound surface.

The only commercially available drilled rotors I know of that have a proper pattern to the holes are Zimmerman cross drilled rotors (also have the benefit of being cast with the holes in place) and Brembo sport drilled rotors. Porsche OE rotors (made by Zimmerman) generally also are good.

For slotted rotors, that's the ticket now in racing. Properly slotted rotors do the same "venting" of gas from the pads that drilled rotors do, without as much stress and crackign as drilled rotors. A properly slotted rotor still wears the pads significantly faster than a flat surface rotor, but not as bad as a drilled rotor. Properly slotted rotors also can crack from heat stress, but are somewhat less likely to crack than drilled rotors. "Properly slotted" rotors have slots that extend from inside the inner edge of the pad compound surface to outside the outer edge of the pad compound. If a slot can be completely covered by the pad, the slot is a manufactured defect, not a "ventilation path" for gases coming from the pad compound surface. The only commercially available slotted rotors that I've seen that actually work like you'd want them to are the ATE "Premium One" slotted rotors (with the rounded star pattern) and Brembo Sport Slotted rotors. I actually might consider slotted rotors for a street driven vehicle, but for the Commander, there are no rotors available with proper, functional slotting.

I've never seen a good implementation of a rotor with both drilling and slots. Those are always gimmicky, potentially unsafe rotors with very limited service life expectancy.

And solid disk wheels like that are great for "rock crawling" and trail riding because they are extremely strong, and they are also reasonably good for drag racing, and they can improve fuel economy a tiny bit, too, on a "street driven" vehicle. There's less aero drag from those wheels. However, with wheels like that, you get one good stop and that's about it until the brakes cool again. As long as you know the limits and respect them, they can be OK. They are not good choices for aggressive driving on twisty, "fun" mountain roads, where repeated applications of the brakes are needed. Depending on what you're towing, and where you're towing it, they might be perfectly fine, or they might be problematic.

UPDATE: If you must have some kind of "fade resistance" from the rotors, the Centric PowerSlot 126.58001SL/126.58001SR setup looks nearly "good enough." I can't tell from the photos online whether the slots go beyond the pad material or not, but they look like they come close to the edge. If the pads you get have a radial (to the rotor) slot across the middle, between the two pistons, those rotors should work even if the slots are slightly obstructed at the inner and outer edges.

They have a matching set for the rears, too, 126.58002SL/126.58002SR.

The one other advantage to slotted rotors is that they do have better and quicker initial bite with full braking effect in the rain. If you've ever been driving for a significant distance on the freeway in the rain, and when you exit, you have that second or two when the pads are running on the water on the rotor and there's almost no braking no matter how hard you press the pedal, slotted rotors eliminate that delay while the water works its way out from between the pad and the rotor surface.
 

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Good luck with those rotors.

I'm sure everything the marketers of those rotors is absolutely true. It's on the Internet, so it must be true. Plus marketers and sales people always tell the absolute truth, all the time.

For anyone else reading this. The down side to drilled rotors (properly drilled ones) is that 1) they crack and 2) the pads wear very quickly.
What makes you so sure that these rotors are not properly drilled?

What are you basing that conclusion on - other than just your opinion?

I know you are knowledgeable Racer_X - and very opinionated - and that's fine.

I read the product description - it says they are designed for trucks - and specifically for towing & hauling;

It also states that the components are specifically engineered to work together.

Why would they advertise that if it wasn't so? They would just be setting themselves up for lawsuit after lawsuit.

No reputable, successful business would risk tarnishing their reputation like that.

All of the buyer reviews on Amazon - from people who actually bought them and have them on their vehicles are 5 stars;

I'm going to get my mechanic's opinion on them at my Jeep dealership - because you are so adamant that these are not proper rotors;

As long as he doesn't voice any concerns, I'm going to give them a shot.

I'm not putting these on because I race my Commander - nothing could be further from the truth.

I'm just looking for a little improved stopping power when I'm towing and I think these will do the trick.

I can always switch back to the stock rotors if I have issues with them down the road - but I don't anticipate having any.
 

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Discussion Starter #18 (Edited)
I moved this up to the top so you'd read it first, and not get bored with the minutiae before you get to it.
I'm going to get my mechanic's opinion on them at my Jeep dealership - because you are so adamant that these are not proper rotors;

As long as he doesn't voice any concerns, I'm going to give them a shot.
Ask whether cracking will be an issue. Also ask how often those rotors should be inspected for cracks, and then think about whether you want to pull those awesome wheels off that often to look at the rotors and make sure there are no critical cracks forming.

Behind stock wheels, those rotors would be bad, but at least you'd be able to give them a cursory inspection every week or so while you're filling the tank, and you'd probably notice a critical crack connecting two of the drilled holes in them. Behind your solid disc wheels, those rotors are a disaster waiting to happen IMO. And that problem is primarily the rotors, not the wheels.
What makes you so sure that these rotors are not properly drilled?

What are you basing that conclusion on - other than just your opinion?
I looked at the pictures, and I can count. A good drilling pattern for our Commander front rotors would have 86 holes (or maybe 129 holes). There are 43 vanes and 43 passages in the front rotors on the Commander. Maybe I should detour a bit here with some background, and some examples.

I've been working on race cars since 1982. I've handled hundreds of properly drilled brake rotors for dozens of different cars.

One of my first tasks on the very first race car (a highly modified Corvette) that I worked on was drilling holes in brake rotors. And I learned that craft from a man who used to work in one of the best Porsche race shops in the world.

Let me show you a picture of a "properly drilled" brake rotor:

Thanks to RockAuto.com and AC-Delco for the pic. I hope they don't mind us using it as an example of something that is mostly good. That's the left front rotor for a C6 Corvette with the J55 "Heavy Duty Brakes" (that went with the Z51 autocross/gymkhana package).

Here's what's good about that rotor:

  • Every passage between the vanes of the rotor has the same number of holes it it. On this rotor, it's 3 holes per passage
  • Obviosly, that makes the number of holes an even multiple of the number of passages (and the number of vanes). The rotor shown has 31 passages, 31 vanes, and 93 holes drilled/cast into it.
  • The holes are all tangential to the vanes, but the holes are completely open to the passages in the rotor. That's the best possible placement for the holes from a thermal stress perspective.
  • It's not entirely obvious from the picture, but if you hold one of those in your hands and measure it, all of the holes are a different distance from the edge (and from the center of the rotor).
  • The vanes are offset from the center and curved. When this rotor is installed on the left side of a vehicle, the vanes act as a fan or turbine to pump air from the center opening on the back side (inside) of the rotor outward through the vanes into the wheel opening.
  • The holes are all chamfered. That helps minimize the "whirling cheese grater" effect and gives somewhat better pad life.
I've actually handled four of those exact rotors (that exact part #) in the past few years. The were on a friend's (we can call her Ms. C6 for this discussion) 2005 C6 Corvette. Two that were severely worn and very badly cracked (one had a small chunk missing) when she first bought the car. She insisted on replacing them with drilled rotors, against my advice, and I put two brand new AC-Delco OE replacement rotors on, just like the ones in the pic above. I handled those new rotors twice, first installing them, and then removing them and replacing them with other rotors when she had cracking issues with the right side rotor again in under 2 years and under 20,000 miles. More on this later.

One condition I had for installing those rotors was that Ms. C6 would have to "inspect" the rotors often. I suggested every fill up and/or every time she washed the car. She was actually very good about inspecting them, and after about 6 months, she saw stress cracks radiating out from some of the holes in the rotors and asked me about that. I looked and the cracks were starting to form, but none had "connected" between two of the holes yet. I showed her that and explained that "connected cracks between holes" was the critical, very bad kind of crack, and the ones she noticed are pretty "normal" for those rotors. She also discovered the first connected holes and brought that to me and that's when we retired those rotors with very little wear and went to the flat, undrilled rotors I previously recommended.

Again, with your choice of wheels, regular inspections of drilled rotors would be a major PITA. Without frequent, regular inspections, drilled rotors are a disaster waiting to happen.

Back to our Commander rotors. Again, there are 43 vanes and 43 passages in the Commander rotors. I actually checked that before pronouncing those rotors you linked to on Amazon "junk". I was pretty sure they had the wrong number of holes in the picture, but I did want to make sure I knew what the correct number was and that the "engineer" who "designed" (using the quoted terms very loosely) those rotors didn't luck into the correct number unintentionally. With 43 vanes, 43, 86, and 129 are the "correct" number of holes for a "well engineered" drilling pattern, with 86 probably being the best choice resulting in the most appropriate size for the holes to give the correct percentage of the rotor area consumed by holes.

Now, let's look at a junk "poseur" rotor:



That's actually a counterfeit knock off of a junk rotor. So it's double junky.

Notice that the holes are all the same distance from the center, and wear the same parts of the pad. The result is different wear characteristics between the bands where the holes are and the bands where there are no holes. That's very bad. It actually reduces the effectiveness of your brakes as the uneven wear builds up.

Also notice the cracking. You might think that the holes that don't show cracks are in a "better location," but in actual fact, those are some of the worst problems because some of those holes are drilled directly through the vanes of the rotor.

The holes on that one are also a bit too large.

The slots don't fix the major problems with the improper drilling pattern.

Here's another picture of a "junk" rotor showing uneven wear from improperly placed features:



It also states that the components are specifically engineered to work together.
What worries me about that claim is that it could mean that the pads in that set suck just as bad as the rotors. Just sayin'.

Why would they advertise that if it wasn't so? They would just be setting themselves up for lawsuit after lawsuit.

No reputable, successful business would risk tarnishing their reputation like that.
And yet, even General Motors has done stupid stuff with drilled rotors. Those C6 rotors I gave as an example. They are fairly well engineered left side rotors. Unfortunately, every C6 Corvette with those drilled rotors also runs that exact rotor (not a mirror image, the same rotor, same part # and same orientation of the vanes and holes) on the "other left" side (AKA the right side). That's just wrong, and the engineers knew it. Unfortunately, management listened to the parts channel guys who wanted one part, one part number for a "front rotor" for the Corvettes with those brakes, and the result is that all of the C6's with the "heavy duty brakes" and the "autocross/gymkhana" package have two left front rotors, one on each side. And all of them have issues with the right front brakes. That rotor is always the first to develop serious thermal stress cracks, and the right front wheel even gets much dirtier from brake dust than the left front. It's because the vanes on that rotor, when it's on the right side of the car, try to suck air in from the wheel opening and pump it back up the ducting and out the openings up front by the bumper. It doesn't work out very well, and mostly, it just impedes the airflow making the right side rotor run significantly hotter in heavy use than the left side rotor.
I'm not putting these on because I race my Commander - nothing could be further from the truth.

I'm just looking for a little improved stopping power when I'm towing and I think these will do the trick.

I can always switch back to the stock rotors if I have issues with them down the road - but I don't anticipate having any.
My recommendation would be get the absolute best pads you can for the Commander and run them on good stock rotors. There's a lot more "improved stopping power" available in better pad compounds than in "trick" brake rotors. And with your choice of wheels, brake inspections are a PITA and you probably don't want parts that require more frequent inspections than the stock parts.

That advice plus four dollars might get you a cup of coffee at StarBucks.
 

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My recommendation would be get the absolute best pads you can for the Commander and run them on good stock rotors. There's a lot more "improved stopping power" available in better pad compounds than in "trick" brake rotors. And with your choice of wheels, brake inspections are a PITA and you probably don't want parts that require more frequent inspections than the stock parts.

That advice plus four dollars might get you a cup of coffee at StarBucks.
Honestly, there is nothing at all wrong with my stock rotors.

What would be your highest recommendation for brake pads for XK's?
 

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Discussion Starter #20
I think I posted my top 3 pics above. The Bendix CT3's are in there, with Hawk Performance Ceramics ( HB558Z.710 for front, HB555Z.678 for the rear )and the Akebono Performance Ceramics (ASP1087/ASP1080 specifically, not ACT1087/ACT1080)

I've always gravitated to Hawk brakes. With this vehicle, I also tow a trailer occasionally (a few times a year, but the trailer with load is near 6,000 pounds). I'll probably put Hawk Performance Ceramics on the back brakes on ours.

Check the guy at https://www.raceshopper.com/ for those. His prices are usually good, and his advice is good, too. Many racers get the pads/brakes for their tow vehicles from him (as well as pads for the race cars), so he's good for advice for brakes for towing, too. He doesn't have an "online store," but deals mostly by email and occasionally by phone.

For the front, I'm really happy with the Bendix CT3's I put on. I kind of wish Bendix made the same compound for the rears. But I almost always have different brands of pads on the front and rear of my vehicles, so Bendix/Hawk fits right in around here. The Mercedes 560 Coupe has Akebono Ultra Premium Performance Ceramics up front and Hawk Performance Ceramics on the back.

If you wanted to go Hawk ceramics all around, that would work.

If you don't mind a bit more brake dust, and possibly a bit more squeaks and noise, the Hawk LTS pads are good, and are tailored more for light trucks and towing applications. I know someone with those on a ford F350 SD Dually who tows a big, heavy triple axle fifth wheel with two cars plus tools in it. He complains about the dust (he's kind of a "neat freak"), but his rig can definitely stop.
 
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