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Discussion Starter #1
Ok so yesterday i replaced my jeep commander 4.7 tranny fluid and both filters and i also had my buddy a guy good with cars replace my rear pinion seal and after picking it up all is good the trans shifts smooth but there is a terrible vibration that sounds like a car rolling over thos stop sighn rivets in the road it only happens at around 1600 rpms and if i give it some gas it stops if i stop accelerating it stops my mechanic buddy said he tightened everything down good the shaft and stuff but i think maybe he overtightened the pinion nut Am i right? i dont know whats cuasing this he said he put about 9 qts of mopar atf+4 in the pan and im not to worried about the trans it feels good but this vibration has me worried maybe u joints or a bushing I dont know:icon_evil:


Thanks for any and all help
 

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Well I think you know already the direction to look in. Just changing the trans fluid wouldn't cause that so its probably the rear end work you had done. If the torque specs aren't followed properly I would imagine something like this can happen. There is a wright up on the process on here I think or on the other forum I know I have seen it.
 

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These trannies take quite a bit of driving to warm up to operating temp., I hope he’s not looking at the “hot” marks on the dipstick after the change… just start the car up while it’s still cold and see where the level is. It should be somewhere between the lower two holes... good luck.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
thanks guys hopefully its not too expensive the jeep is almost paid for so i plan on keeping it so im gonna have them run through the whole jeep look at everything and check it all out
 

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Fluid Level Check

NOTE: If equipped with a dipstick, use the following
procedure. If your vehicle has a capped dipstick tube, it
is sealed and should not be tampered with. Your authorized
dealer has the proper tools to ensure that the fluid
level is set properly.

Check the fluid level while the transmission is at normal
operating temperature. This occurs after at least 15 miles
(25 km) of driving. At normal operating temperature the
fluid cannot be held comfortably between the fingertips.

To check the automatic transmission fluid level properly,
the following procedure must be used:

1. Operate the engine at idle speed and normal operating
temperature.

2. The vehicle must be on level ground.

3. Fully apply the parking brake and press the brake
pedal.

4. Place the gear selector momentarily in each gear
position ending with the lever in P (Park).

5. Remove the dipstick, wipe it clean and reinsert it until
seated.

6. Remove the dipstick again and note the fluid level on
both sides. The fluid level should be between the “HOT”
(upper) reference holes on the dipstick at normal operating
temperature. The fluid level is only valid if there is a
solid coating of oil is seen on both sides of the dipstick. If
the fluid is low, add as required into the dipstick tube. Do
not overfill. After adding any quantity of oil through the
oil fill tube, wait a minimum of two (2) minutes for the oil
to fully drain into the transmission before rechecking the
fluid level.

NOTE: If it is necessary to check the transmission below
the operating temperature, the fluid level should be
between the two “COLD” (lower) holes on the dipstick
with the fluid at approximately 70°F (21°C) (room temperature).
If the fluid level is correctly established at
room temperature, it should be between the “HOT”
(upper) reference holes when the transmission reaches
180°F (82°C). Remember it is best to check the level at the
normal operating temperature.

CAUTION!
Be aware that if the fluid temperature is below 50°F
(10°C) it may not register on the dipstick. Do not add
fluid until the temperature is elevated enough to
produce an accurate reading.

7. Check for leaks. Release parking brake.

To prevent dirt and water from entering the transmission
after checking or replenishing fluid, make certain that the
dipstick cap is properly reseated. It is normal for the
dipstick cap to spring back slightly from its fully seated
position, as long as its seal remains engaged in the
dipstick tube.
 

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i know but my mechanic said it still looks low to him im gonna run it into the dealer tomorrow im not drivng it
Ummm, why don't you open the hood and check the trans fluid level yourself and make sure he didn't overfill it.

The reason why the dipstick says "DO NOT OVERFILL" is because, if you overfill the fluid, the level can reach rotating parts of the trans and that can cause the trans fluid to foam up.

Foamed trans fluid can cause clutch packs NOT to engage fully, and clutch packs NOT engaging fully can cause slipping, chatter and vibrations.

Yea, its possible its the pinon seal change NOT having the proper pre-load, but don't rule out the trans, check the trans fluid level and make sure it is right, if it is NOT, I would suspect that as a possible cause.

Someone correct me if I'm wrong, but for the pinon you have to check the pre-load on the pinon, if its off, you can have to much pressure on the bearings, if its too high they can be ground up. Checking the preload will tell if you tightened the pinon nut too much.
 

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For the pinion the pre-load is measured by rotational force.

If you tighten it too much, you'll end up frying the bearings. If it's too loose, there'll be slop with will cause gear chatter due to incorrect meshing of pinion & ring gear teeth.
 

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And I believe the procedures say to pull the rear brakes and rotors to prevent any drag from the brakes adding to the rotational torque you measure, and give an erroneous reading for the pre-load.
 

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yep sounds like dealer work maybe if my mechanic did something wrong he can help me pay for it
Well, I realy dislike the dealer's, so my bias is going to show here. The Dealers policies with their workforce often result in giving them all the wrong incentives and driving out the best techs, while rewarding the worst techs. So, I'd say there is NO such thing as "Dealer Only Work", independent shops can do everything the dealer do and do a better quality job at it. BUT, independent shops can be small or inexperienced also, and less then honest taking on jobs they don't have the tools and experience to do, but claim they can.

Sadly, all the manufacturers, and it appears Chrysler has become the worst of the bunch, have decided they will use their advantage of imbedded software, to create "Dealer Only Work" and make it impractical for anyone but the Dealer to access that imbedded software and force their customers into the Dealer's regardless of what they prefer.

There are many independent shops that can do that axle work, and probably do a better job then the dealer. Sadly, a few of them can't and instead of referring you to a shop that can, they may take the job on, without the proper tools and experience and make things worse. Sadly, Dealers will do the same thing, even though that should never happen with them.

With axles, that have to be set up precisely, it is possible if you take it apart carefully and put it backtogether the exact same way with the same shims/adjustments, etc, that it will still be in spec once back together. Some people have done that and got away with it. You shouldn't do that, because it can easily go out of spec even if you put it all back toghether properly. And the Pinon Pre-Load is about the toughest to mark and re-install exactly how it came apart, if NOT totally impossible. And it sounds like that is what your mechanic did, and didn't do the proper checks and adjust to set the proper pre-load, and it ended up being off.

Checking pre-load is just following the procedure in the book and having the little tool that reads that low of a torque the right way as you turn the pinion. You don't need a dealer to do that, but you need someone that isn't going to just hope putting it all backtogether the same way will put it in spec and NOT check it.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
well i found out what was wrong aparrently my u joints on the driveshaft were lodged in place and after replacing the pinion seal they became loose and started to vibrate so I need new u joints total cost $1,193 including labor and i have no warranty this is gonna suck
 

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well i found out what was wrong aparrently my u joints on the driveshaft were lodged in place and after replacing the pinion seal they became loose and started to vibrate so I need new u joints total cost $1,193 including labor and i have no warranty this is gonna suck
$1200 for u-joints ?
 

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non-serviceable joints.... they have to replace the whole driveshaft.

MSRP of $900 and they'll probably charge him 1-2 hrs for labor and diagnosis...


***** JUST ORDER IT YOURSELF*****

You can get the driveshaft for ~$700 and install it yourself. BAM, saved $500.


Edit: ask them what part numbers they're installing and let us know... looking at the 06 manual and getting much lower prices (like $200) for a driveshaft. That doesn't seem right...
 
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