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so I got this error bad / missing sensor or something and a warning light, I scroll through the info center and all tires show good pressure except the left rear where it is just a dash with no pressure reading. After driving a little it goes off and all tires show pressure, but it doesn't last and I'll get the same error and warning light. Do i have a bad sensor and can I change just the one? Couldn't find a definite answer because not all commanders show individual pressures it seems? Idk any help would be great. And the dealer is I guess the last resort because I'm stationed on guam and the wait to get in there is comical
 

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Probably need a new TPMS unit in the wheel, how old? they use batteries that last from 5 to 6 years. Most tire stores here in US have the sensors - installed for around $50.
 

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Mine still not working... Yours?

I first replaced all four with NAPA... And had the "Service Tire Pressure Monitor(s)". Then two weeks ago... I had Mopar re-installed... Same problem.
 

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2007 Commander Limited

The chatter I have read... Different Mopar part numbers for different years? One post reported there is only one-specific TPMS for the 2007? What MHz is mine... What should it be? Help!
 

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Most auto parts stores have computer look up of the correct parts for your year and model. On-line ordering does the same also.
 

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clapperc, it sounds like you have a problem with the transmitter/receiver and/or rest of the system, and NOT a bad sensor itself. You may need to have the diagnostic trouble codes for the system read and troubleshoot it.

I "think", meaning I don't know, the Commander has a TPMS system that does NOT need programming. i.e. you can replace a bad sensor and just drive a few miles and it will recognize the sensor and turn out the light. Provided you got the exact right sensor for your vehicle.

Replacing the sensor requires removing the tire, then remounting and balancing it.

The seals and stems on the sensors are replaceable, so you don't have to buy a whole new sensor for a damaged valve stem or leaking seal. You do have to remove the tire though.

The aftermarket has started to offer aftermarket TPMS sensors for less than the dealer specific TPMS sensor for you vehicle. These aftermarket sensors are programmable to mimic several different brands/manufacturers of sensors. i.e. a tire store only has to carry a couple of different types of sensors to be able to service hundreds of different vehicles. Even though the Commander doesn't require programming, if you use one of these aftermarket programmable sensor, the sensor itself would have to be programmed to mimic the Commander's specific sensor.

Of course, you can also get the aftermarket sensors online and pre-programmed for you specific vehicle. Johnsvt, if you have an autohobby shop in Guam, you could order one of these cheaper, pre-programmed sensors and install it yourself and it should work without any programming.
 

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Responses in red:

clapperc, it sounds like you have a problem with the transmitter/receiver and/or rest of the system, and NOT a bad sensor itself. You may need to have the diagnostic trouble codes for the system read and troubleshoot it.

I "think", meaning I don't know, the Commander has a TPMS system that does NOT need programming. i.e. you can replace a bad sensor and just drive a few miles and it will recognize the sensor and turn out the light.
Correct.
Provided you got the exact right sensor for your vehicle.
I do according to the parts list from my VIN.

Replacing the sensor requires removing the tire, then remounting and balancing it.

The seals and stems on the sensors are replaceable, so you don't have to buy a whole new sensor for a damaged valve stem or leaking seal. You do have to remove the tire though.

The aftermarket has started to offer aftermarket TPMS sensors for less than the dealer specific TPMS sensor for you vehicle. These aftermarket sensors are programmable to mimic several different brands/manufacturers of sensors. i.e. a tire store only has to carry a couple of different types of sensors to be able to service hundreds of different vehicles. Even though the Commander doesn't require programming, if you use one of these aftermarket programmable sensor, the sensor itself would have to be programmed to mimic the Commander's specific sensor.
As noted before... I first tried NAPA's... Now Mopar... Same problem with both.

Of course, you can also get the aftermarket sensors online and pre-programmed for you specific vehicle. Johnsvt, if you have an autohobby shop in Guam, you could order one of these cheaper, pre-programmed sensors and install it yourself and it should work without any programming.
The problem: Although all four sensors are transmitting 315 Mhz... I lose connectivity to a single tire randomly.
 

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TPMS - service manual

SENSOR DESCRIPTION
NOTE: On vehicles equipped with a Tire Pressure Monitoring System (TPMS), when the spare tire pressure sensor is replaced with a new pressure sensor, a diagnostic scan tool MUST be used to run a routine that will program the new pressure sensor ID into the Wireless Control Module (WCM), commonly referred to as the Sentry Key Remote Entry Module (SKREEM). Please copy the ID number off of the new pressure sensor before installing it into the spare tire. Then follow the programming steps outlined in the diagnostic scan tool for: “Learn Spare Tire Sensor ID” under” Miscellaneous Functions” for the “WCM/Wireless Control Module” menu item as appropriate.
NOTE: If replacing the WCM, the spare tire must be dismounted from its wheel to access and note the spare tire pressure sensor ID. Then follow the programming steps outlined in the diagnostic scan tool for “Learn Spare Tire Sensor ID” under “Miscellaneous Functions” for the “WCM/Wireless Control Module”? menu item as appropriate. In addition, the placard pressure thresholds must be updated in the new WCM. Go to (Update Pressure Thresholds( under (Miscellaneous Functions( for the (WCM Wireless Control Module( and follow the procedure. On vehicles equipped with Tire Pressure Monitoring
System, one tire pressure sensor (6) is mounted to each wheel (5) in place of the traditional tire valve
stem. Each sensor has an internal battery that lasts up to 10 years. The battery is not serviceable. At the time of battery failure, the sensor must be replaced. The TPM system operates on a 315 MHz radio frequency. The 315 MHz sensors can be easily identified by a white outline oval (black center) insignia (3) on the sensor body.

The Export TPM system operates on a 433 MHz radio frequency. The 433 MHz sensors can be easily identified by a solid white oval insignia (3) on the body.
CAUTION: Although 315 MHz and 433 MHz sensors are identical in size and shape, they are not interchangeable. Always make sure the correct sensor is being used. The TPM sensors are designed for original style factory wheels. Do not attempt to install a tire pressure sensor in an aftermarket wheel.
The serviceable components of the tire pressure sensor are :
² Sensor-To-Wheel Seal (2) and Metal Washer (1)
² Valve Stem Cap (4)
² Valve Stem Core
² Valve Stem Nut (with pressed-in washer) (3)
The valve stem caps and cores used are specifically designed for the tire pressure monitoring sensors. Although similar to standard valve stem caps and cores, they are different. The valve stem cap has a special seal inside to keep moisture and corrosion out. The valve stem core has a special nickel coating to protect from corrosion. (didn't work)
OPERATION
The battery operated tire pressure sensors lay dormant (Park Mode), then wake and start transmitting (Drive Mode) when the vehicle first reaches speeds over 20 mph (32 km/h). Once the wheels stop rotating for a period of approximately 20 minutes, the sensors shut down until again awaken. Although not transmitting as when in Drive Mode, while in Park Mode, the sensors still transmit approximately once every 13 hours to let the receiver know air pressure status at that time. Using an RF signal, each sensor transmits tire pressure data approximately once every minute only in drive mode. Each sensor’s (transmitter) broadcast is uniquely coded so that the wireless control module (WCM) can monitor the
state of each of the sensors on the four rotating road wheels.
 

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TRANSPONDER
DESCRIPTION - PREMIUM SYSTEM
A transponder is located in three of the four wheel wells of the vehicle to provide the WCM/SKREEM with the location of the tire pressure sensors on the vehicle. The transponders are located in the left front, right front and right rear wheel wells. A fourth transponder is not necessary in the remaining wheel well due to the process-of-elimination theory. Once the system knows the location of the first three sensors it assumes the location of the fourth tire pressure sensor is in the left rear tire.
OPERATION - PREMIUM SYSTEM
Transponders located in three of the four wheel wells of the vehicle to provide the Wireless Control Module (WCM) commonly referred to as the Sentry Key Remote Entry Module (SRKEEM) with the location of the tire pressure sensors on the vehicle. The transponders are located in the left front, right front and right rear wheel wells. A fourth transponder is not necessary in the remaining wheel well due to the process-of-elimination theory. Once the system knows the location of the first three sensors it assumes the location of the fourth tire pressure sensor is in the left rear tire.
 

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TIRE PRESSURE MONITORING SYSTEM
DESCRIPTION
BASE TIRE PRESSURE MONITORING
This system will consist of tire pressure monitoring sensors attached to each wheel through the valve stem mounting hole, a central receiver module (WCM) and a yellow telltale. A sensor shall be installed in the spare wheel if the vehicle is equipped with a matching full size spare wheel and tire assembly.
PREMIUM TIRE PRESSURE MONITORING
The system will consist of tire pressure monitoring sensors attached to each wheel through the valve stem mounting hole, a wireless control module (WCM), Three Wheel Sensor transponders are mounted in the wheel wells (2 in the front and 1 in the rear wheel wells). a re-configurable dot matrix display module and a yellow telltale. A sensor shall be installed in the spare wheel if the vehicle is equipped with a matching full size spare wheel and tire assembly.
 

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Thank you for posting this description of the TPM system.

My TPM display shows dashes (--) for my rear left, and has for over a year now. I have done a number of tire rotations in that time, and it continues to be only the rear left that displays the dashes. Based on this, I can safely eliminate the valve stem transmitter as the culprit.

It appears significant that there are transponders in each front and on the rear right, but not in the rear left which is where the problem is on my Jeep.

Any suggestions as to how I fix this?
 

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I just replaced one bad sensor in my Commander, I went with aftermarket, a Denso Sensor, one pre-programmed for my vehicle. I have a 2010 Commander, so there is likely changes to the TPMS, I'm pretty sure my sensor's documentation said its 433MHz.

Denso 550-2501 TPMS Sensor


One nice thing about this sensor, the valve stem is encapsulated in rubber, it installs and removes like the old rubber valve stems, it is less rigid and has some give and take. Still more rigid than the old rubber valve stems, because it still is a solid brass core that is needed to be the antenna for the sensor, but the base that seals to the wheel is mostly rubber allowing it to move about, and thus if it comes in contact with anything it has some give and take and is less likely to break. Although the problems with the earlier TPMS all metal valve stems I really think were due to corrosion, which this would solve as well.

And I did have a lot of trouble removing the old broken sensor, the valve stem hardware was totally seized from corrosion, NOT only rounded the nut but ended up snapping the hex portion off the nut completely, I had to cut the old valve stem out.

Oh, after replacing it, I still had the light and warning, but like I thought, after driving a little while it would register the new sensor and it did at 1.3 miles, the light and warning went out and never returned.
 

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Thank you for posting this description of the TPM system.

My TPM display shows dashes (--) for my rear left, and has for over a year now. I have done a number of tire rotations in that time, and it continues to be only the rear left that displays the dashes. Based on this, I can safely eliminate the valve stem transmitter as the culprit.

It appears significant that there are transponders in each front and on the rear right, but not in the rear left which is where the problem is on my Jeep.

Any suggestions as to how I fix this?
Did you ever check PCM codes (key dance or code reader)
As you read above the fourth tire sensor is determined via the process of elimination.
Does your message display show any issues?
Do you have a spare tire sensor? Do you rotate your spare tire?
Other box in the system is the Wireless Control Module - this could have codes stored that need to be cleared or this box needs a programng refresh (dealer items)
Did you ever get this fixed?
 

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Tpms

I just replaced one bad sensor in my Commander, I went with aftermarket, a Denso Sensor, one pre-programmed for my vehicle. I have a 2010 Commander, so there is likely changes to the TPMS, I'm pretty sure my sensor's documentation said its 433MHz.

Denso 550-2501 TPMS Sensor


One nice thing about this sensor, the valve stem is encapsulated in rubber, it installs and removes like the old rubber valve stems, it is less rigid and has some give and take. Still more rigid than the old rubber valve stems, because it still is a solid brass core that is needed to be the antenna for the sensor, but the base that seals to the wheel is mostly rubber allowing it to move about, and thus if it comes in contact with anything it has some give and take and is less likely to break. Although the problems with the earlier TPMS all metal valve stems I really think were due to corrosion, which this would solve as well.

And I did have a lot of trouble removing the old broken sensor, the valve stem hardware was totally seized from corrosion, NOT only rounded the nut but ended up snapping the hex portion off the nut completely, I had to cut the old valve stem out.

Oh, after replacing it, I still had the light and warning, but like I thought, after driving a little while it would register the new sensor and it did at 1.3 miles, the light and warning went out and never returned.
Mongo; getting ready to replace my leaking and corroded sensors. Planning to purchase the rubber mounting type like ye.

Did you have to do any programming? Sounds like yours were plug and play.

I do understand that if I replace the spare tire sensor, I will have to extract the ID number off the new sensor and have that programed in.

https://www.densoproducts.com/Automotive-DensoProducts-l1351.aspx
 
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