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I am looking at a 2008 commander rocky mountain edition. I am not getting a straight answer at the dealership. There are several different systems for jeep. I am trying to find out if the commander is a 4x4 or all wheel drive. There is nothing inside the jeep that I can put my hands on to put it in four wheel low. no button no lever. How would I found out what system is on this jeep before I buy it? It's not in the manual. I have looked, only says if equipped.I have tried websites with no luck. Thanks for your time please help.....
 

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You must have the single speed transfer case, since you don't have low range. The 4x4 Jeeps are actually AWD. What size engine is it? Tell the dealer you want the factory build sheet that will tell every option and feature from factory.
 

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Look to the right of the shifter. In the indent storage pocket on the console, at the rear, if there is a chrome "T" handle, this is what used to select 4LO. This would indicate QTII. It is standard on the V8's, optional on the V6. If there is a Chrome QuadraDrive II emblem behind the shifter, this is the only indication for QDII, which adds ELSD's to QTII. If there is no chrome "T" handle, this indicates QT1, a full time 4WD system. QT1 is basically the same system as QTII, but without the 2-speed transfer case (4LO). :eek:rangehat:

QT1: QuadraTrac 1 - Standard V6
QTII: QuadraTrac II - Optional V6, Standard V8
QDII: QuadraDrive II - Optional V8 - was initially standard with the 5.7 Hemi, but then became optional.
 

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Unless you have a gear or dial inside your Jeep and there is a 4x4 icon on the jeep, you have a full time 4 wheel drive. I had been told when I purchased mine, that it was AWD until the sensors detected a wheel slip and then it auto goes into 4x4 mode. Not so. Have an independent repair person (or even your local tire company) look at the wheel units and axle. If they do not show a "lock down" then the vehicle is full time 4x4.
 

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Unless you have a gear or dial inside your Jeep and there is a 4x4 icon on the jeep, you have a full time 4 wheel drive. I had been told when I purchased mine, that it was AWD until the sensors detected a wheel slip and then it auto goes into 4x4 mode. Not so. Have an independent repair person (or even your local tire company) look at the wheel units and axle. If they do not show a "lock down" then the vehicle is full time 4x4.
No one needs a mechanic to see if its a 4x4 or what type of 4x4 either. It's to easy and most of the things to look for have been mentioned. But every one leaves out the only true way to tell the difference between QT2 and QD2 and thats the diff cover bolt counts. 10 for QT2 and 12 QD2, also a 4x4 badge can be added with out actually having 4x4 installed. So a quick inspection in the wheel well works fine. Have a half shaft (CV) then you have a 4x4 then look for the t-handle don't have that QT1 have that then look at the diff cover to see which one you have.
 

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We are confusing the h*** out of the OP.:icon_confused:
 

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Were both 4x4 systems available all production years?
All THREE (QTI, QTII, QDII) 4WD systems were available in all production years.
 

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Most V6's were QTI and the V8's were either QTII or QDII, but there are exceptions and they are fairly rare.

Its simple, like stated

  • If there is NO silver "T" handle next to the shifter, it is QTI
  • If there is a silver "T" handle next to the shifter, it is QTII or QDII
  • If there is a silver "T" handle next to the shifter, But No little placard just below the Shifter stating "Quadra Drive II", it is QTII
  • If there is a silver "T" handle next to the shifter, And A little placard just below the Shifter stating "Quadra Drive II", it is QDII
You can request a Build Sheet from Chrysler to confirm that those clues are correct (or if the little QDII placard fell off)

You can do a visual inspection of the equipment on your Jeep to confirm if those clues are true.

Do a search of the sight, you'll find posts telling you how to request a build sheet. Do a search of the sight, you'll find pictures and descriptions telling you how to tell the different transfer cases and axles apart.

AWD, vs 4X4, Part-Time 4WD vs Full-Time 4WD, LSD vs Locking Diffs vs Electronic Controlled Throttle and Braking to limit wheel slip, etc is all higher concept stuff and people mix around the terms all the time and disagree with the definitions. The Jeep website is confusing how this equipment works, its basically dumbed down too much and can really confuse people that know enough to think about it. Search the posts that explain, or ask some specific questions for us to explain it to you, so we can do it without giving you a fire hose of explanations that will just confuse you.
 

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OK.

In looking for a used one, since that is the only option now, :mad: which is better for snow performance? I know I want low range, so AWD is completely out. (isn't that kinda lame? making a Jeep without low range!) The Commander I'm driving now, of my dads, has QT2. If I'm in it for the long haul, plowing snow and such, I think I'll want the QD2 with the limited slip Diff. in the back. Correct? There's nothing more irritating than hanging the plow up on a snow pile and not being able to back up because one front wheel doesn't have enough weight on it.

I don't go off road much, but I refuse to let snow stop me from doing anything!
 

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QT1<QT2<QD2 worst to best for all offroad or low traction conditions.

QT1 - no t-handle next to shifter (10 bolts on rear diff housing)
QT2 - has a t-handle is brake assisted traction control (10 bolts on rear diff housing)
QD2 - has t-handle and has electronically controlled limited slip differentials both front and rear (12 bolts on rear diff housing and badging by the shifter saying Quadra-Drive II)
 

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OK.

In looking for a used one, since that is the only option now, :mad: which is better for snow performance? I know I want low range, so AWD is completely out. (isn't that kinda lame? making a Jeep without low range!) The Commander I'm driving now, of my dads, has QT2. If I'm in it for the long haul, plowing snow and such, I think I'll want the QD2 with the limited slip Diff. in the back. Correct? There's nothing more irritating than hanging the plow up on a snow pile and not being able to back up because one front wheel doesn't have enough weight on it.

I don't go off road much, but I refuse to let snow stop me from doing anything!
You could wait until they produce the new Jeep Wagoneer that they announce, but it may be another year, even more before it goes on sale. Look for reviews of the new Durango, its suppose to be based on that, meaning it will likely be 4 wheel independent suspension like the new Grand Cherokee.

Have you considered getting an old junker for your snow plowing? Plowing snow is about the roughest thing you can do to a vehicle that is NOT designed for it, or loads similar to it.

Before you condemn Jeeps without 4LOW, keep in mind Jeep makes 2WD versions of their vehicles as well.

AWD? You realize the only difference between all 3 systems is the 2 spd or 1 spd xfr case and QDII adds Electronic LSD's. If QTI is AWD, then QTII and QDII is AWD also, just the ability to go AWD in lower gear.

Jeep claims there is a 48%/52% torque split front/rear, but doesn't explain how it achieves that, nor does any cross section, diagrams or exploded views yield any insight on the xfr cases on how it makes that torque split. Personally, I think Jeep is counting the friction & drag of all the extra CV joints in the front driveline that are NOT in the rear, to come up with their torque split. Eitherway, the 48%/52% split, if its even true, is close enough, its Full-Time 4WD IMO.

All three systems have the Electronic Brake Control System (ECBS), that uses the ABS to activate brakes at individual wheels to limit wheel slip and provide better directions control and help mitigate roll-over situations. Its a virtual LSD and does actually work pretty well, but the ELSD is better.

QTI does just fine in the snow, but if you going to plow, yea QTII or QDII would be much better.

QTII has the 2spd xfr case, that can go into 4LOW, and in 4LOW it locks the center differential.

QDII has the 2spd xfr case, that can go into 4LOW, and in 4LOW it locks the center differential. It also has the ELSD's in both front and rear axles, that electronic controls a pump that varies the pressure on the LSD clutches, it will actually lock the differentials when you need it.

The ELSD takes longer to react in reverse, a second or two, while its near instantaneous in forward. Still should be the best if your going to use a Commander to plow snow.

Almost all the V6 have QTI, the V8's have QTII or QDII, again if you going to use a Commander to plow you'd want a V8. Last time we posted about snow plowing, more than one guy posted that plowing with their Jeeps resulted in having lots of problems with their Jeeps shortly after, and they NOT lasting as long if they hadn't. I'm sure it also depends on how often and how sever you plow.
 

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You could wait until they produce the new Jeep Wagoneer that they announce, but it may be another year, even more before it goes on sale. Look for reviews of the new Durango, its suppose to be based on that, meaning it will likely be 4 wheel independent suspension like the new Grand Cherokee.
I don't trust Fiat to create a big square clunky "Wagoneer" in styling. I fear it will look like a Great, Grand Cherokee.

Have you considered getting an old junker for your snow plowing? Plowing snow is about the roughest thing you can do to a vehicle that is NOT designed for it, or loads similar to it.
That probably is the best move. The new Jeeps with IFS are really substandard for any real work.

Before you condemn Jeeps without 4LOW, keep in mind Jeep makes 2WD versions of their vehicles as well.
I'm well aware of that. Some of the greatest Jeep Icons were DJs and the original Jeepster, even the 4x2 Patriot is a great utility station wagon. I'm just saying, IF....you go 4x4 put the low range in there too. I'm mostly torqued off at Jeep for turning their backs on utility in favor of up scale luxury.

AWD? You realize the only difference between all 3 systems is the 2 spd or 1 spd xfr case and QDII adds Electronic LSD's. If QTI is AWD, then QTII and QDII is AWD also, just the ability to go AWD in lower gear.
Generally I use AWD for vehicles where the driver has no choices and 4WD where some choices can be made by the driver.

Jeep claims there is a 48%/52% torque split front/rear, but doesn't explain how it achieves that, nor does any cross section, diagrams or exploded views yield any insight on the xfr cases on how it makes that torque split. Personally, I think Jeep is counting the friction & drag of all the extra CV joints in the front driveline that are NOT in the rear, to come up with their torque split. Eitherway, the 48%/52% split, if its even true, is close enough, its Full-Time 4WD IMO.
Which is funny because 90% of the time we don't really need 4 wheel drive.

All three systems have the Electronic Brake Control System (ECBS), that uses the ABS to activate brakes at individual wheels to limit wheel slip and provide better directions control and help mitigate roll-over situations. Its a virtual LSD and does actually work pretty well, but the ELSD is better.
It is wild when that kicks in.


QTI does just fine in the snow, but if you going to plow, yea QTII or QDII would be much better.
QTII has the 2spd xfr case, that can go into 4LOW, and in 4LOW it locks the center differential.

QDII has the 2spd xfr case, that can go into 4LOW, and in 4LOW it locks the center differential. It also has the ELSD's in both front and rear axles, that electronic controls a pump that varies the pressure on the LSD clutches, it will actually lock the differentials when you need it.

The ELSD takes longer to react in reverse, a second or two, while its near instantaneous in forward. Still should be the best if your going to use a Commander to plow snow.
I was just to the Jeep site. to see their descriptions of the systems. They claim to have a neutral in the T case now. Did they add that in 2011 after the Commander was done? No more cheesy chrome T handle switch. They went back t a real lever. (even if it does the same thing)

Almost all the V6 have QTI, the V8's have QTII or QDII, again if you going to use a Commander to plow you'd want a V8. Last time we posted about snow plowing, more than one guy posted that plowing with their Jeeps resulted in having lots of problems with their Jeeps shortly after, and they NOT lasting as long if they hadn't. I'm sure it also depends on how often and how sever you plow.
It is asking a lot for the new "dumbed down" Jeeps to do the work of an Willys/Kaiser/AMC Jeep. Jeeps proverbial compass has been left spinning without much real direction by Daimler, Cerberus, and now Fiat pointing ever farther from the Jeep roots of basic toughness and utility.
 

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I was just to the Jeep site. to see their descriptions of the systems. They claim to have a neutral in the T case now. Did they add that in 2011 after the Commander was done? No more cheesy chrome T handle switch. They went back t a real lever. (even if it does the same thing)
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The ones with the T handle have neutral, it's a small push button requiring a pen or something small to push it with. So all QT2 and QD2 have transfer cases capable of neutral (I can't remember if QT1 does or doesn't though..)
 
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