Jeep Commander Forum banner

1 - 20 of 32 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
232 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I aplogize in advance that this is aimed at the not very mechanical crowd so that they might save a few dollars and appreciate thier ride even more.

Takes about an hour or more - Thanks for the heads up EburgJeep forgot who i was writing for! Edited by albertschmitz

Tools Needed:
Anti Sieze Compound
Good Plug Gapping Tool
Pliers - You never know
Straight Pick - helps with plug connections
1/4 Drive Ratchet with 3 " extension and Deep #10 socket
#10 ratcheting Combination wrench
3/8 Drive ratchet with 6" extension and 5/8 spark plug socket - does not need to be a swivel socket
5/16 nutdriver - for the 3 clamps - intake hose and behind the airbox attached to the throttle body.

View from the front - I always start on the Passenger side - usually toughest and takes the longest. Makes you appreciate the drivers side



Loosen clamp closest to the main airbox



And then by the air filter box



Remove hose



Locate and unclip the plug for the IAT on the main airbox passenger side





Remove bolt from the passenger side main airbox



1/4 drive with the #10 socket


And then the Drivers Side



same 1/4 drive and #10

 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
232 Posts
Discussion Starter #2
And the clamp behind the main airbox attached to the throttle body





Now lift the front of the main airbox a bit and pull forward, if it has not been off before it will be a little tight.



You will now see the 6 or 8 coil on plug modules that need to be removed for access to the plugs - Blow them and the surrounding area off with compressed air so as not to get any debris in the cylinders when the plugs are removed.

Installed



Lifted out



They will lift up - a little effort here but no tools other than hands, try to come up straight. The passenger side rear one will require that you ease the transmission tube towards the passenger fender a bit for clearance. There is a bracket that holds a connector back there that will need to be reinstalled after the plug is finished.

Here is the connector and bracket area



The red tab will need to be slid over a small ways so that the connector can be unlatched - it is a vibration lock and you will need to make sure that you push it back when you reconnect it.



Get your plugs out and verify the gap (.044 on the 06 4.7 Liter Commander) Better to do all at once and put the protectors back on than try to remember as you are going.





Be gentle on the gaps remember they are moving in thousandths of an inch not inches.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
232 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
As for removing the old plugs they will be in there snugly so you will need to use some force to remove them, if it seems excessive make sure that you are lefty lucying not righty tighening them!!!!!!!!!!!

Place the used plugs in a scrap piece of cardboard so that you can have a mechanic look them over to see if there are any problem areas. You want them in the same location that they came out of the engine so if there is a problem the mechanic will know what cylinder/bank to look at.

Use a box bottom 8" by 10" will suffice, to make an area for the plugs take a box cutter and slice an X for each plug and put the top in first so the electrode is facing up. Make sure you mark passenger and drivers side.

I just put the thread protectors from the new plug to the used one as they come out and mark the gap and location.

Example of a typical original plug at 91000 miles of use and normal wear.




The old ones like mine all read in the .054 to .060 range and that is normal, not good for fuel economy but normal wear and nothing to worry about.

Remove and replace the plugs one cylinder at a time and put a small amount of antisieze compound on the threads before install.

The plugs need to be tight but not cranked in place.

If you are a big person do not crank them down you will not like the bill that you will receive for the helicoil repair on the head.



Good luck and I hope that this saves you a few dollars for a necessity like, I dunno mods? accessories and you know the basics.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
12,559 Posts
I will make this a sticky. Nice write up.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
232 Posts
Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
Nice Post. Thanks. U mean to tell me u actually put 91,000 miles on the original plugs? WOW!
Yes bone stock factory Champions in there, they will go 100,000, but the fuel economy really starts to suck in town. The coil packs can fire with enough power for larger gaps, but I would recommend highly against that. Plugs only cost 1.75 to 5.00 depending on the brand and cores. I use Denso or NGK because I have always had great luck with them in all of my cars, trucks and bikes.
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
1,993 Posts
If I can make one suggestion. I saw this in another thread and I did it and was glad I did. Which is to use a compressor to blow out all the dust a debris before removing the plug its self. I did it and man the stuff that came flying out of there that could of possibly slipped in while changing the plugs just suggestion. Awesome post by the way.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
232 Posts
Discussion Starter #9 (Edited)
If I can make one suggestion. I saw this in another thread and I did it and was glad I did. Which is to use a compressor to blow out all the dust a debris before removing the plug its self. I did it and man the stuff that came flying out of there that could of possibly slipped in while changing the plugs just suggestion. Awesome post by the way.
This is on the second post, I totally agree!!!

"You will now see the 6 or 8 coil on plug modules that need to be removed for access to the plugs - Blow them and the surrounding area off with compressed air so as not to get any debris in the cylinders when the plugs are removed."
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Spark plugs for 4.7 engine

I own a 2008 commander with a 4.7 engine double plug.
Reading the owners manual said that one set of spark plug it needs to be changed at every 30,000 miles and another set at 100,000 miles. If this statement is correct, which plugs are the one that needs to be changed every 30,000 miles?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,262 Posts
I own a 2008 commander with a 4.7 engine double plug.
Reading the owners manual said that one set of spark plug it needs to be changed at every 30,000 miles and another set at 100,000 miles. If this statement is correct, which plugs are the one that needs to be changed every 30,000 miles?
The upper plugs, the ones on the intake side every 30 k
Or, If you want, put the same plugs that are on the sides (the 100k ones) up top.
I believe they are just the double platinum version of the top plug number.
Then you leave those in till 130k.

Rob
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
24 Posts
Nice tutorial!!! I have one suggestion. I was just doing this when my plug socket came off the extension. Thanks be to all that it was one of the front instead of the back 2. I had to fish it out with needle nose pliers. I taped the socket to the extension for the remainder!! As well, make sure the rubber is still inside your socket when installing.

HTH! :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,037 Posts
You can put the extension back in the socket, then turn the socket backwards to unwedge it from the spark plug. Doesn't always work, but sometimes it does, its worth the 10 seconds to try since it takes less time then finding your needle nose pliers, if the rubber insert is still enough keep the socket stuck on the spark plug, you're no worse off.

Also, look inside your socket and look for the little divot in 3/8" drive fitting, line that up with the ball detent on the extension, the detent will fit in the divot and give greater resistance to pulling out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
188 Posts
What is the model of Champions that comes standard on 4.7L Commanders? I'm curious what the spec is for the spark plug heat range.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
422 Posts
having a misfire problem in cylinder 3 ...which one is cylinder three and what would be the proper thing to do (4.7L V8)...trying to save a few pennies
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6,309 Posts
I tried finding out where cylinder 3 was but couldnt find anything online. But to fix the problem you might just have a bad spark plug. Once you figure out where that cylinder is pull the plug and see how bad it is.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,262 Posts
If you are referring to a code, GetNby, it means third cylinder of the firing order, not cylinder number three.
The firing order is 18436572........third cylinder in firing order is number 4.
Cylinder numbering on Mopar V-8's is, Odd #s on left, Even #s on right......left and right of a vehicle are determined as, sitting in it, looking forward.

So, 1357 are on left, 2468 on right.
Your code indicates the second cylinder from the front on the right(#4) side is experiencing a occasional misfire......if it was a steady misfire, the Check engine light would be flashing.
Occasional misfire can be caused by a partially obstructed fuel injector, a weak ignition coil, or a bad plug related to that cylinder.

Clear the code and transfer the coil to a different cylinder, and reinstall the removed coil to the cylinder setting the code and go for a drive.
If the same code resets, you now know to next change the plug in the third cylinder or #4.
If a code sets for the cylinder you moved the suspect coil to, replace that coil.

Once the plug is changed, again, clear the code and road test......same code, there most likely is a injector problem at that cylinder.

If this proceedure points to a injector concern, run a large bottle of Chevron Injector Cleaner through with a full tank of a name branded fuel.
I recommend the Chevron product only because it contains Techron, a licensed detergent only available by them and the only detergent all automakers have given their recommendation to.

Rob
 
1 - 20 of 32 Posts
Top