Jeep Commander Forum banner

1 - 20 of 20 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
422 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hello, its been quite some time...
Long enought that I need to replance at least the brake pads if not the rotors to be safe. However I am a novice at mechanical work and don't want to get in too far over my head. I have searched for a "How to" on such an installation through the site and haven't come up with anything...I have never changed brake pads before always had the mechanic do it. What is there to watch out for?
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
1,993 Posts
Its pretty straight forward thing to do. Pull of the old ones and slap in the new ones. Just make sure you have the correct tool to push the caliper piston back in not sure witch one the XK takes my ford took a special tool available for loan at most parts stores as well as the lube packs to grease the slides.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
15,092 Posts
Hello, its been quite some time...
Long enought that I need to replance at least the brake pads if not the rotors to be safe. However I am a novice at mechanical work and don't want to get in too far over my head. I have searched for a "How to" on such an installation through the site and haven't come up with anything...I have never changed brake pads before always had the mechanic do it. What is there to watch out for?
See this thread---> http://www.jeepcommander.com/forums/showthread.php?t=12961&highlight=brakes
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
691 Posts
Here is what my special tool looks like. Any Good C-clamp should work. Just leave the old pad on to compress the piston then remove the pad when compressed.



like this pic. Just go slow when compressing.

 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
15,092 Posts
Here is what my special tool looks like. Any Good C-clamp should work. Just leave the old pad on to compress the piston then remove the pad when compressed.



like this pic. Just go slow when compressing.
Is the silverfish optional ?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
338 Posts
Here is what my special tool looks like. Any Good C-clamp should work. Just leave the old pad on to compress the piston then remove the pad when compressed.



like this pic. Just go slow when compressing.
Your special tool looks just like my special tool....... and I never found a vehicle it wouldn't work on.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
691 Posts
Is the silverfish optional ?

Lol! I googled C-clamp and that was one of the first pics. Not my silverfish. But it looks just like my clamp. Mine might have mice droppings on it its in my shed. So the silverfish might be a better photo.
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
1,993 Posts
FYI thats what I had in my box as well. The tool I needed actually turned the piston while pushing it back in. The passenger side turned counter clock wise and the driver side turned clock wise. My C-clamp would not push the piston in at all thats how I found out about the new pistons on some vehicles needing this tool
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,037 Posts
BRAVO, use one of the old pads between the "C"-Clamp and the Piston, it will protect the surface of the piston and distribute the load/force over the face of piston and help force it back STRAIGHT.

I hear/see to many people push the piston back by putting the "C"-Clamp directly on the piston, on one side, since the center is hollow, or even use big channel lock pliers to force the piston back.

Chrysler uses phenolic pistons, NOT metal, in their brakes, they have their advantages, but surface hardness is NOT one of them, its easy to chip, crack, break the piston if you use the wrong tool or force it the wrong way.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,037 Posts
FYI thats what I had in my box as well. The tool I needed actually turned the piston while pushing it back in. The passenger side turned counter clock wise and the driver side turned clock wise. My C-clamp would not push the piston in at all thats how I found out about the new pistons on some vehicles needing this tool
I haven't done any brake work on my Commander yet (other than fresh brake fluid).

So, the pistons need to rotate as they are forced back into the bore of caliper? This requires a special tool?

Most of the earlier Chrysler calipers, with phenolic pistons, I've pulled them apart and rebuilt them, there was nothing in them that would force the piston to rotate, the seal, cylinder and piston all smooth bore.

BUT, things change, really just looking for a comfirmation.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
338 Posts
I've always used a C-clamp placed in the center of the piston on my wife's 2001 Liberty. Haven't had to worry about the Commander yet.
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
1,993 Posts
No I have not done the commander brakes yet and I said I was not sure which one the commander takes was just letting him know there are different kinds. Then what I took as sarcasm from a couple of other posts about there special tool like I was crazy. Was just letting people know that some brake calipers require a tool that turns the piston as it push's it back in. I'm glad that the XK does not require this but the tool does exist. But pretend this don't exist and one day you will be cranking on your C clamp wondering why it's not working and hopefully figure it out before you break something.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
691 Posts
No I have not done the commander brakes yet and I said I was not sure which one the commander takes was just letting him know there are different kinds. Then what I took as sarcasm from a couple of other posts about there special tool like I was crazy. Was just letting people know that some brake calipers require a tool that turns the piston as it push's it back in. I'm glad that the XK does not require this but the tool does exist. But pretend this don't exist and one day you will be cranking on your C clamp wondering why it's not working and hopefully figure it out before you break something.

I have heard of that before. I was making fun of my simple tool collection. It is good to know. like you said one day it might be needed.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,096 Posts
Sal, you're ok with the Commander, it does not require any special tool. I see some use a c-clamp. I just use a pair of vice-grips like this.

We have a lot of these at work , used primarily for clamping replacement quarter panels and such for welding.
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
1,993 Posts
I actually had a tool for that it was treaded with a brake pad shaped plate on it. I was cranking on that thing until my hands were tore up. Thats when I figured out something was off. The scary part was I thought my wifes calipers were frozen and I started pricing new ones out. Thank god I decided to pull the manual out to make sure I wasn't missing anything and thats when I noticed the the calipers were different then anything I've worked on. this was a ford by the way
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,128 Posts
The pistons that need to be turned in are ones that use the caliper itself as the E-Brake.

The commander doesn't have this so its not a concern.

C-Clamps work great. I actually have a specialty tool that works like a caulk gun as well.

Here's two quick tips:
A: DO NOT take both calipers off and then try compressing one side. This will push the caliper out of the other side. So you either want to do one side at a time, or lock the other caliper in place (you can shim it with a piece of wood or something too).

B: Double check the brake fluid reservoir. A lot of people mistakenly "refill" it when it gets now, not realizing that the fluid will go back into it when they replace the brakes. If you ever "topped it off", you're going to have a mess to clean up when you compress your calipers.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,128 Posts
Here's the tool I have... the thing works great on both double and single piston calipers;

http://www.amazon.com/Lisle-25750-Piston-Caliper-Compressor/dp/B0002SQUTU


When i do my brakes, I use the C-Clamp to "lock" the caliper on one side, then I use that special tool to compress the piston on the other.

I have a little trick where, while compressing, i slightly open the bleeder. Instead of fluid going back up into the reservoir it comes out the bleeder. Then when im done with the brake job, i fill the reservoir with some fresh fluid and pump the brakes up.

Note that i have a lot of experience with this and can do it without letting any air in the lines. If you make a mistake (or try doing this with the C clamp) you're likely to let some air in and will need to bleed the brakes a few times to ensure there isn't any air in there. (I have a suction bleeder too in case i screw up:rofl:)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,037 Posts
The pistons that need to be turned in are ones that use the caliper itself as the E-Brake.
That makes perfect sense now, thanks Matt and Sal, something to keep in mind when doing brakes.

Chrysler uses the Drum-in-Hat, since drum brakes are self-energizing, it takes less force for the same resulting braking than disc brakes, an advantage for a purely mechanical brake using cables.

The calipers that also work as an e-brake off a cable, must use some sort of screw mechanism to get a mechanical advantage to get the necessary brake force out of cable actuated by someone's arm. Thus the reason to screw the piston back in on those calipers.

Double check the brake fluid reservoir. A lot of people mistakenly "refill" it when it gets now, not realizing that the fluid will go back into it when they replace the brakes. If you ever "topped it off", you're going to have a mess to clean up when you compress your calipers.
Yes, in fact most vehicles now, the difference between the Full and Add marks is also the distance the fluid level will go down between new and worn out pads. i.e. as you check your fluid level you get an indication of how much brake pads are left. Of course assuming there are no leaks, and it can't indicate if the pads are wearing evenly or NOT, so you really do need to keep checking the pads from time to time, you can have some pads worn out and others with lots of life and that will NOT bring the fluid level down to the Add mark.

Another Technique I have been told and have tried. Open the bleeder screw before compressing the piston, just force the fluid out of the caliper, instead of forcing the old and dirtier fluid back flowed through the system all the way up to the reservoir. Of course there is always the risk of getting air into the system when you open a bleeder screw, BUT, that is another advantage of having the speed bleeders I have. The one way check valve prevents air from getting into the system. The times I've opened the speed bleeder to compress the piston, I have never gotten air in the system. In fact, since I have used speed bleeders I have never gotten air in the system and I bleed brakes far often than most people.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Most of the foreign vehicles require the "turn-in" tool. I did brakes on my brother's Nissan a couple years back and required the tool. The pistons actually rotate in and out. First time I saw one like that after years doing brakes...
 
1 - 20 of 20 Posts
Top