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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Updated May, 2010

- Rocky Road 2.25" spacer lift (do not bother with their shocks)
- AEV Pintler wheels - 17"x8.5", +25mm offset (XK/WK spec)
- 275/70/17 BFG All-Terrains (measure 32.2" in diameter)
- Offset/Adjustable ball joints (from Rocky Road)
- pinch weld folded toward outside of Jeep (added clearance)



















 

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Discussion Starter #2 (Edited)




Some detail pics:

Offset ball joints pull the top of the tire in a bit and allow for some negative camber. The AEV wheels also keep the 275mm tire a good distance away from the ball joint stud.



Approximately 0.25" minimum clearance between tire and A/C lines.



The pinch weld has been folded toward the outside of the Jeep for maximum tire clearance when turning the steering wheel. This pic shows the stock strut fully compressed. There is approximately 1" minimum clearance here. The A/C lines and bottom metal bracket beneath these lines turn out to be the limiting factor.





The only location of rubbing at the front is on the inside of the wheel well toward the back of the tire. You can see the slightly shiny part on the metal. The tire only rubs at full lock either direction, and is worse if the strut extends downward (A-arms arc the tire closer to the inside of the Jeep). Thinking about installing some steering stops to prevent this (would be a relatively minor adjustment).



The rear has some slight rubbing at the front and back ends of the fender (inside faces of white fender) at full flex. It's really not bad though, and some light trimming will fix this. One important note is that I'm running stock length shocks and no sway bars. If the shocks were any longer, there would be more axle drop on the unloaded side, and would pivot the "stuffed" tire even further up into the fender. In addition, further axle articulation (given the short rear control arms) will also rotate the axle, pushing the "stuffed" tire backward into the back side of the fender. Just a heads-up.



The factory grille and headlight housings are primarily chrome on the Limited, which I think looks awesome on medium to darker colored XK's, but it gets washed out on white. I like the contrast of the black XK with the chrome headlights and grille, and thought I would do the opposite with mine. The color I chose is a close match to the color of the AEV wheels, but the angle of the grille and clear housing of the headlights makes it look darker a good portion of the time. If I was doing it over again, I would go with a shade lighter than the wheels so that it just "appears" like a closer match.



 

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Welcome to the forum, thanks for opening your garage too us!
 

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Wow ,, What a flex !! ,,

How is the handling on road without any sway bars ?

Did the rear right wheel rib on this pic ?

 

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What is the benefit of this amount of flex in such case where the coil does not apply any force on the wheel to gain traction?

 

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And what´s the benefit when you limit the flex and the wheel get´s of the ground?
For me, it´s better to have the wheel on the ground, then in the air.
And in the end, that´s why they make lockers:)
 

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And what´s the benefit when you limit the flex and the wheel get´s of the ground?
For me, it´s better to have the wheel on the ground, then in the air.
And in the end, that´s why they make lockers:)
You are correct, more flex will give you more articulation, but this much of flex with no weight on the wheel is useless IMO, so there is a limit for beneficial flex in terms of traction gain.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Thanks fellas! The ride w/o swaybars isn't bad - you just have to get used to it. The XK is the 4th truck I haven't run swaybars on as a DD.

As far as the flex w/o the rear swaybar, it's a marginal benefit. Even though the coil spring is just hanging in place, the wheel still has some downward pressure on the ground until it's in the air. If the coil spring was the only thing affecting downward axle movement on that side, the axle would not continue to drop when the coil spring fully extends. There are multiple little factors that contribute to this - many of which I don't understand :)

As far as forward traction is concerned, it's not a huge effect, but sometimes a little bit is all you need, and I've found that having the extra flex allows me to go farther off road without having to select 4 low, which can get annoying when having to make sharp turns on the trail.

But as others have said, this is a QDII truck, so forward motion isn't the main reason I like the extra droop. The main reason I like it is for stability. With the unloaded wheel still touching the ground, it is steadying the truck as it gets crossed up in a rut like in the pictures, or if the tire does completely lift, it stabilizes sooner as it teeters over. It always feels better to have more tires touching the ground, even if they're just steadying you.

None of the above is going to make the world of difference, but it's better. That, and it makes for cooler pictures!

Thanks again!
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Oh, almost forgot. You can also see that, in the pictures, the spring is hanging, but the shock is fully extended. If the truck decided to roll to that side, the shock would initially be putting pressure on that wheel before the spring even got back to the perch. Just adds stability.
 

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Would love to hear more about what you used and how you painted the insides of the light assemblies. Looks really nice, though.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
I just used a can of bonding agent with some spray paint from Advance Auto (GM match spray paint). You just have to bake the lights apart. About 10 minutes at 230 degrees worked for mine - one was a bit stubborn. After the clear part is separated from the housing, you can remove the inner plastic panel to paint - it pops right out, and you don't have to mask anything off. Then you reassemble the headlight housings by reheating. I added some extra black sealant, though.
 
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