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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Mechanic called me and told me I need to take my Jeep to a dealer for a BCM issue because its giving a code of 2100. I really don't want to take it there and have it cost an arm and a leg. Does anyone know anything about this or how to fix it??
 

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“P2100 is a diagnostic trouble code (DTC) for "Throttle Actuator Control Motor Circuit Open (TACM)". This can happen for multiple reasons and a mechanic needs to diagnose the specific cause for this code to be triggered in your situation.”

Google is your friend.
 

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2006 Commander LTD 5.7 QDII 3.73 stock.
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I currently have the P2100 code show up this weekend. Luckily I had just started down the street. About two minutes after startup it threw the code. I was wondering if you were able to correct the problem??
 

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2006 Commander LTD 5.7 QDII 3.73 stock.
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That’s what a am hoping. It’s going to have to wait until the weekend.
 

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2006 Commander LTD 5.7 QDII 3.73 stock.
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Update
FSM states "The condition sets when PCM detects an internal error or a short betwen th ETC motor- and ETC motor+ circuits in the ETC Motor Driver. One trip fault. ETC light flashing." I checked for short between the DarkBlue/Grey and DarkBlue/LightGreen wires which powers the ETC also checked each wire for short to battery voltage. Also checked continuity of each wire. Checked the ETC Motor resistance should be between 2.5 and 25 ohms in the closed position. Everything checked out good, So it looks like there is a problem in the PCM.
 

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2006 Commander LTD 5.7 QDII 3.73 stock.
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This is a follow-up to the P2100 code. I was able to find the fault which caused the DTC. My journey started with the Commander entering the "limp mode" at a stop sign. I was able to return home and park it in my yard. I have a steep driveway and was unable to go up it. After a few hours I went to see if it would reset itself. It started with no codes, so I parked it in the driveway.

A few days later, I was going to drive it and the engine would crank over but not start. My Craftsman Scanner showed a P2100 code. I had previously obtained a Factory Service Manual and started to diagnose it by the book.

I Checked it for shorted and open circuits, circuits good, checked the ohms of ETC motor , within range. Next step the PCM
Rechecked the wiring from the PCM to the ETC. looked good.

So, I pulled the trigger on a reprogrammed PCM. Plug and Play installed and same code P2100. The probability that the PCM I purchased had the same problem as the original one to me was highly doubtful.
Decided to go a different route.

I purchased an Autel MaxiAP AP200 scanner which could show live data.

When I pressed on the Accelerator pedal, Live data show voltage changed on the accelerator pedal but not on the throttle body. Out of curiosity, I moved the throttle plate manually, and it showed a change in voltage. I concluded there was no voltage to the ETC motor to make the plate move. Where does the voltage come from??

I studied the Theory of Operations and Descriptions in the Service Manual to figure what happens between the time you turn the key to Start and the engine running after releasing the key. Dug into the wiring diagrams and found that it didn’t give that warm fuzzy feeling of what was the problem. Still searching for answers I found this article:

In the end, it's all just voltage | Vehicle Service Pros

Replaced ASD Relay and it started right up after of about a year and a half..
 
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