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For all of you out there with 265/70/17 (E), do your tires feel extremely heavy and really hurt your gas mileage? Still thinking about going 255/75/17 in load C.
 

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I personally wouldn't. One of the reasons that my MPG was not negatively effected when I lifted is that I went with a P class A/T tire. I don't tow with this vehicle ever of course. I know that the guys running heavier load range tires have seen more significant MPG hits.

Any reason that you feel that you need load E?
 

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Well I really like 265/70.. But nothing more than the occasional boat or jet ski tow and a trailer full of trees. However they don't have Cooper STT's in a 255/75 so that's primarily my reasoning.
 

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Well I really like 265/70.. But nothing more than the occasional boat or jet ski tow and a trailer full of trees. However they don't have Cooper STT's in a 255/75 so that's primarily my reasoning.
AH I see, its the only option in the tire brand and size that your after.

Whats the weight difference?
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Load C, i don't know. The Coopers are 55 lbs i think in load E
 

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I have a question about comparing load range of tires, and although this is an old thread, I figured I'd be best to tag onto this thread and go from there. I am looking to put on BFG All Terrains. 265 70R 17. I am comparing load range "C" vs. "E". When comparing... I find that C has maximum load of 2470 lbs. vs. the E has max load of 3085 lbs. C weighs 48 lbs per tire, and E weighs 54 lbs per tire. C has a maximum inflation pressure of 50 psi vs. the E having a maximum pressure of 80 psi. The C tire has 6 plys and E tire has 10 plys. The cost difference is about $7 more expensive for the E, so that is not a factor really.

Would the increased plys mean a longer lasting tire?
Would the slightly heavier tire translate to decreased fuel economy as indicated in this older thread content as listed above?
I just texted with BFG technician online who stated there is no difference in longevity of a 6 vs. 10 ply. Anyone else have thoughts?
Any reason why I should choose one over the other?

Oh... and I was just originally planning to get the load E because if a tire is rated for more weight it seems logical that it would have better longevity, but according to BFG tech, it doesn't.

I am buying wheels and saw that the aluminum wheels I am looking at are rated for 2400 lbs. or so. So the increased weight capacity of the load E seems irrelevant if the weakest link is the wheel.

Just curious if anyone has insight. Thanks!
 

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Mine originally had 245/70/17 load range c's on factory commander rims. I drove it that way for a few months. I then swapped on load range e 245/70/17's on 2011 Grand Cherokee rims. I hunt in the fall and the terrain can be quite harsh. Ten ply tires are a lot harder to puncture. The sidewalls don't sag either. I noticed absolutely no difference in fuel economy.

The longevity doesn't change because the reinforcing ply's are not rubber. The rubber content stays the same. What kind of wheels are you looking at?
 

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If you plan on Load Range E's and will fill to the 80 PSI make sure your wheels (rims) are rated for that pressure. Most standard, & I say most (need to verify) wheels are rated to 50 PSI. Load range D are 65PSI, with E @ 80.
 

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For all of you out there with 265/70/17 (E), do your tires feel extremely heavy and really hurt your gas mileage? Still thinking about going 255/75/17 in load C.
Even with P265/70R17's - my mileage is not great - but then again, it never really was.

I'm actually thinking about getting 285/70/17's but I don't know if they will fit.
 

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It's worth noting that you shouldn't fill E tires to their recommended maximum PSI. 80 PSI is meant to handle the additional weight of heavy duty trucks and trailers, and will keep the tires from flexing under the weight. However, an XK weighing around 2.5 tons, the 80 PSI is excessive and will cause uneven wear as the weight won't cause the tread to be fully in contact with the road.

A good way to determine what tire pressure you should run is to use chalk to determine what section of tread is contacting the road. You can dust the pavement with chalk, roll your tires over it, and look at the markings left behind. You ideally want all of the tread to be touching, which should happen around 35-40 PSI. Start higher, around 50, and slowly air down until you find the point where all tires touch. Also take into account the fact that at highway speeds your tires will probably increase 2-3 PSI, so drop your pressure down a couple PSI.

You can also just run your tires at the recommended PSI on your door sticker. Jeep took the time to test what PSI works well, and this PSI will transfer pretty well across tire ratings.
 

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It's worth noting that you shouldn't fill E tires to their recommended maximum PSI. 80 PSI is meant to handle the additional weight of heavy duty trucks and trailers, and will keep the tires from flexing under the weight. However, an XK weighing around 2.5 tons, the 80 PSI is excessive and will cause uneven wear as the weight won't cause the tread to be fully in contact with the road.

A good way to determine what tire pressure you should run is to use chalk to determine what section of tread is contacting the road. You can dust the pavement with chalk, roll your tires over it, and look at the markings left behind. You ideally want all of the tread to be touching, which should happen around 35-40 PSI. Start higher, around 50, and slowly air down until you find the point where all tires touch. Also take into account the fact that at highway speeds your tires will probably increase 2-3 PSI, so drop your pressure down a couple PSI.

You can also just run your tires at the recommended PSI on your door sticker. Jeep took the time to test what PSI works well, and this PSI will transfer pretty well across tire ratings.
I usually just use the eyeball test for my tires PSI - usually lands me at around 42 PSI with the TOYO P265/70R17's I'm running right now.
 

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[
I usually just use the eyeball test for my tires PSI - usually lands me at around 42 PSI with the TOYO P265/70R17's I'm running right now.
Doing it by eye is usually more than accurate enough. The main thing is to set pressure properly and not to just max out the tire.
 

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The e's only need to be run at 80 psi on a 3/4 ton or 1 ton that is carrying a heavy load. I run mine at 45 psi. Several tire shops told me that anything past 45 psi is a waste of time on a jeep.
 

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The e's only need to be run at 80 psi on a 3/4 ton or 1 ton that is carrying a heavy load. I run mine at 45 psi. Several tire shops told me that anything past 45 psi is a waste of time on a jeep.
Yep, that rings true to me.
 

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Mine originally had 245/70/17 load range c's on factory commander rims. I drove it that way for a few months. I then swapped on load range e 245/70/17's on 2011 Grand Cherokee rims. I hunt in the fall and the terrain can be quite harsh. Ten ply tires are a lot harder to puncture. The sidewalls don't sag either. I noticed absolutely no difference in fuel economy.

The longevity doesn't change because the reinforcing ply's are not rubber. The rubber content stays the same. What kind of wheels are you looking at?

See? That is what I was thinking with the 10 ply. Seems like they would be harder to puncture. To answer your question on what wheels... I am trying to find something in that 8" or maybe 8.5" wide wheel. One choice would be the XD 775 Rockstar in 8" with a +10 offset giving me a 4.9" backspace. I'm finding 8" wide wheels are not too common for the jeeps. I'm finding a couple other options on the 8.5" wide with a +10 offset for a 5.2" backspace. I know the backspace offset is a whole nother question, which I won't delve into here. Thanks for the thoughts!
 

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See? That is what I was thinking with the 10 ply. Seems like they would be harder to puncture. To answer your question on what wheels... I am trying to find something in that 8" or maybe 8.5" wide wheel. One choice would be the XD 775 Rockstar in 8" with a +10 offset giving me a 4.9" backspace. I'm finding 8" wide wheels are not too common for the jeeps. I'm finding a couple other options on the 8.5" wide with a +10 offset for a 5.2" backspace. I know the backspace offset is a whole nother question, which I won't delve into here. Thanks for the thoughts!
This might help;

https://www.discountedwheelwarehouse.com/Jeep___Vehicle_Bolt_Pattern_Reference.cfm
 

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Thanks for the thoughts on the load range. I like the idea of the higher ply tire, but running it lower pressure. I agree, no need to run the tires at such high pressures. I have BFG A/T on a Ford Excursion, and even on those Load E tires, I don't run at maxed out pressures. I appreciate all your thoughts!
 

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Ha!! Thanks for the link Flex. I could only get one link to work, but the one that did was the first link, and I was literally just looking at those wheels at 4wheelparts online yesterday. That company is opening a brick and mortar store close to my house, and I may have to go take a look in person now.
 

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I have purchased a lot of stuff from them. Including my OME springs, Rancho shocks and struts and my drilled and slotted rotors and ceramic pads.
 
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