Jeep Commander Forum banner

1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I have been getting a low air indication flashing on my dash display. It will flash for a couple minutes and then turn off as I am driving and then turn on randomly here and there. I have checked all the pressures in the tires and they are good. Any ideas? Thanks in advance!! :icon_confused:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
147 Posts
Mine was doing that with the old tires...hasn't happened since I put the tpms sensors in the new rims and had them rebuilt(knock on wood). No idea why it was doing it though.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
674 Posts
Did you check the spare tire?
How old are the sensors? The battery in them is only good for about 6 years, one may be going dead.
Search here for TPMS (Tire Pressure Monitoring System).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,037 Posts
From the 2007 Service Manual "Each sensor has an internal battery that lasts up to 10 years. The battery is not serviceable. At the time of battery failure, the sensor must be replaced."

So, it is realistic that some sensors the battery starts to die at 8 years or even 6 years.

Unfortunately, the battery is NOT serviceable, so you'll need to replace the sensor with a $45-$80 replacement because the $2 battery can NOT be replaced in the sensor.

Sorry, I could NOT find in the Service Manual anything about a flashing TPMS lamp and what it signifies.

There are codes for the system, they all start with "C", have you done the key dance to see if the codes read out in the EVIC? Sorry, I don't know if the TPMS codes read out in the EVIC, NOT all codes will read out from the key dance.

BTW, if you take this to a shop to diagnose and fix it, call around to tire shops and ask if they diagnose TPMS issues. I'm betting most tire shops will charge half as much to diagnose and fix a TPMS issue than most dealerships.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Thanks guys. That gives me a start. I will do some testing and maybe take it to the tire shop if anything and will let you guys know what I found out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
51 Posts
Goto a shop, and fill the tires up to the proper air pressure level, the spare as well, (don’t goto a gas station because their gauges are usually not accurate and that will throw off your diagnoses.) because some cars have TPMS on the spare aswell...drive it around and hopefully the light wont come on intermittly, if it does take it to a tire shop and have them ID which TPMS is defective and just replace that one….and have them reset the TPMS monitor system if all TPms are good. And you should be good.,
Remember TPMs sensors are different on different makes and models; some are really sensitive, so depending on where you live. In the morning when its cold, and your tires are cold the PSI will be lets say 30PSI and in the afternoon when u been on the freeway for 30 mins and your tires are hott. your tire pressure could possibly be at 36 psi. and that’s what your TPMS will reflect, also in colder areas sediments build-up can create on the inside of the tpms sensor causing false or no readings, causing TPMS lights to come on and off when you know u have proper air pressure,
I personally gave up on the TPMS sensors that i have been driving around with regular valve stems, and sometimes my TPMS light turns off… I believe the ECM is trying to make a connection with the sensors but no communication is found. Because I don’t have TPMS in my tires,,, I believe the off and on light are those causes.
Also I started to realize that parts stores are carrying aftermarket TPMS sensors. so u can bring the tire shop ur purchased TPMS and have the them install them and reset TPMS, because they pretty much don’t charge for installation they charge for “TPMS RESET”
I personally think it’s a waste of money tring to solve a TPMS issue knowing you have the proper air pressure and don’t have nails on the tires. In the early 2000s nobody really had TPMS sensors so why worry about the TPMS light now, when u know ur good.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
35 Posts
I have had this same problem for about 3 years now. I am convinced it is the TPMS on the spare, but I just cannot justify spending 80$ on a sensor for a tire I don't use. I just monitor the air pressure in my tires myself every few weeks or so. I have become accustomed to the tire light being on 24/7.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,037 Posts
That is one of the frustrations of how all the manufacturer's make their diagnostics proprietary.

Don't confuse the diagnostics with the OBDII codes, that is emissions only, which does include just about every engine fault, because just about every engine malfunction will effect emissions. OBDII codes is easily accessible via the key dance or cheap scanners you can buy or go to your local auto store and have them read it for you, etc. The rest of the fault codes, in the air bags, TPMS, stereo, body computer, etc, etc, that "could" be read just as easily, but the Federal Government didn't mandate it, so all the Manufacturers make those codes proprietary and only able to be read by a very expensive tool that they make it only easy for the Stealerships to have. So they force you to go into the Stealership and pay outrageous fees for service that most people could do themselves if they just had access to the diagnostic information.

I had a TPMS light despite having good air pressure in the tires. Since I invested $500 for an AutoEnginuity Tool just for Chrysler vehicles (its pretty crappy, but it plugs into a laptop and runs their software) I was able to plug in an read the proprietary fault codes and figure out exactly what was wrong, and which sensor was bad. I complain about the tool I got, but a better tool would cost thousands of bucks. So its either pay $500 for a bottom of the barrel tool or take it to the dealership or tire shop and pay them $200-$300 for a repair I did myself for $35*.

*Keep in mind, since I'm retired military, I get to use the local base Auto-Hobby Shop, to dismount and remount and balance tires for like $4. Most folks still have to pay a tire shop $40-$75 to dismount, remount and balance a tire.

Still, I hear of folks having to pay tire shops and dealerships $200-$300 to replace one TPMS wheel sensor? You can get a brand new quality TPMS sensor for $35 online, of course there is the mounting and balancing fees for the Shop machines that can do it, but really $200-$300? that is outrageous, and again consumers being taken advantage of.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
294 Posts
If the Jeep is smart enough to know that the tire pressure is wrong (high or low) and the spare is involved then why is there not a reading for the spare and or if there is how do we find it? I'm taking mine (HER'S) in to have the rims checked, cleaned and sealed as I feel that the sensors are right and the rims are leaking.

Swanny
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top