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Discussion Starter #1
I realised that I'd posted my first post in the new member section rather than exhausts so here goes...

I've running the 5.7 v8 Hemi and I'm going to keep the stock resonator at the rear. I started off thinking I wanted a Flowmaster super 50 or the 50 series but after hours of listening and reviewing I'm thinking either the 18 or 22 Maggie as I reckon they have a deeper sound plus slightly better performance and for the most part people are saying that they don't get any drone, although there are exceptions.

What I'm not sure about is which one to go for with the fact I'm keeping the resonator on as definitely don't want it to kill the sound after all this!

Anyone got experience with either and keeping the stock res on? and any drone issues?

Cheers
 

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Discussion Starter #2
Hi guys, has no one had any experience with these mufflers? I thought I'd be inundated with posts!

Was hoping to be able to order them this week so any experience or thoughts would really help. Thanks
 

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Hi guys, has no one had any experience with these mufflers? I thought I'd be inundated with posts!

Was hoping to be able to order them this week so any experience or thoughts would really help. Thanks
I have the Magnaflow cat-back on mine, as do a lot of the members here. It comes with a resonator to replace the stock resonator.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Unfortunately I don't have the cash to spend on the full system so just going for the muffler, so that's why I'm hoping people can share their experiences with either the 18" or 22" magnaflow with either the stock resonator or I suppose a new one (however that will produce a different sound again I guess?)
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Any experience Magnaflow mufflers???

Hi all, I know there are lots of posts on other makes of car about this but can't actually see any chat on this specific Jeep/ setup. I'm running the 5.7 hemi and want to swap JUST the muffler (I don't have enough cash for the full catback system) and leave the stock resonator in place.

Has anyone had experience with swapping out just the muffler for a magnaflow 18" or 22" oval and keeping the stock resonator at the rear. After a lot of research these are my two best options.

As with most people, I'm looking for the deep growl, not obnoxiously loud and no drone inside the cab for the wife and kids.

I have posted on this subject before but didn't get much response, if anyone can help it would be great. Thanks
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Just spoke with my mechanic who said it could be tricky welding the original steel exhaust to the new stainless steel muffler.

Has anyone had any issue with this or know if any special technique was needed?
 

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Just spoke with my mechanic who said it could be tricky welding the original steel exhaust to the new stainless steel muffler.

Has anyone had any issue with this or know if any special technique was needed?
Nope. The Magnaflow cat-back just bolts on.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Hi, thanks but I'm not talking about the catback, just the muffler.

If anyone has had experince with attaching just a new stainless steel muffler of any make to the original pipes I'd love to hear if it was straightforward or needed any special working. Thanks
 

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Just spoke with my mechanic who said it could be tricky welding the original steel exhaust to the new stainless steel muffler.

Has anyone had any issue with this or know if any special technique was needed?
PCP;

As long as it's intake and exhaust connections are the correct diameter to fit the factory exhaust piping, it can be done;

However, your mechanic raises a valid point and you will need to find a pretty skilled welder to do it.

Stainless steel can be temperamental when being welded to another type of metal - regular steel or otherwise, because Stainless steel has a higher flash point and requires a hotter flame/higher temperature to weld - hotter & higher than regular steel does - which means the stock factory steel exhaust pipe is unavoidably heated well beyond it's normal flash point which makes the two difficult to weld together.

Difficult, but not impossible - it can be done, by a skilled welder.

But, it's probably going to cost you more than just a normal muffler replacement, because of the extra work involved for the welder.

I understand after reading this thread that you are on a tight budget - and I get it, we've all been there at some point.

The simple alternative (which would probably be cheaper) would be just by a plain steel Magnaflow muffler, instead of one made out of stainless;

I'm fairly certain Magnaflow makes them out of regular steel too.

You'd still get the sound you are looking for and you wouldn't have all the welding headaches that come with a stainless steel muffler.
 

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Has anyone had any issue with this or know if any special technique was needed?
Anyone who TIG welds stainless steel can TIG weld stainless steel to mild steel. That's not difficult with the right equipment and skills.

Anyone who is uncomforable with (or incapable of) properly welding stainless steel should not be trusted with that job.

Having said that, I'd clamp it in with some good band clamps. Not sure if your joints will be lap joints (one pipe is expanded and slips over the other pipe) or butt joints (both sides the same diameter, just butted against each other), but Walker makes some good clamps for exhaust in either style. I'm also not sure the size of your pipes. As an example, look for Walker 33310 for a 3" butt joint clamp or Walker 33222 for a 3" lap joint clamp.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Anyone who TIG welds stainless steel can TIG weld stainless steel to mild steel. That's not difficult with the right equipment and skills.

Anyone who is uncomforable with (or incapable of) properly welding stainless steel should not be trusted with that job.

Having said that, I'd clamp it in with some good band clamps. Not sure if your joints will be lap joints (one pipe is expanded and slips over the other pipe) or butt joints (both sides the same diameter, just butted against each other), but Walker makes some good clamps for exhaust in either style. I'm also not sure the size of your pipes. As an example, look for Walker 33310 for a 3" butt joint clamp or Walker 33222 for a 3" lap joint clamp.
Thanks guys, I've spoken to my mechanic again (who's boss is back in the country) and has said they can do it with the equipment they have but like you said, it needs to be real hot and a nice big overlap and weld.

I'll update in the next few days with hopefully some pictures and videos.
 

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Even if this can be welded, are you sure you want it welded?

Stainless steel expands and contracts much more with temperature changes than mild steel. And exhaust pipes see a lot of temperature changes in normal service. If the inlet pipes at your muffler heat up enough that the mild steel of the stock exhaust pipe grows by 0.004" (not unheard of), then the stainless steel pipe on the muffler will grow by about 0.006" at the same temperature. If the two are welded together, that's going to put a lot of stress and fatigue into the welded joint. Eventually, that's going to cause the joint to crack.

If you decide you must have this joint welded, you really, really want the stainless steel pipe inside the mild steel pipe at the lap joint. That might mean you need to have a short piece of stainless pipe welded to the muffler at each end so there's something to put into the mild steel pipe after you have that stock, mild steel pipe expanded.

Even if I was doing this on a race car, where I would expect extreme use, extreme temperature swings, and extreme vibration and G loads from cornering and braking, I'd still go with the band clamps I mentioned. They will absorb the differences in thermal expansion, and the specific type of clamp I specified is strong enough and wide enough at the joint to withstand a lot of stress and abuse.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Even if this can be welded, are you sure you want it welded?

Stainless steel expands and contracts much more with temperature changes than mild steel. And exhaust pipes see a lot of temperature changes in normal service. If the inlet pipes at your muffler heat up enough that the mild steel of the stock exhaust pipe grows by 0.004" (not unheard of), then the stainless steel pipe on the muffler will grow by about 0.006" at the same temperature. If the two are welded together, that's going to put a lot of stress and fatigue into the welded joint. Eventually, that's going to cause the joint to crack.

If you decide you must have this joint welded, you really, really want the stainless steel pipe inside the mild steel pipe at the lap joint. That might mean you need to have a short piece of stainless pipe welded to the muffler at each end so there's something to put into the mild steel pipe after you have that stock, mild steel pipe expanded.

Even if I was doing this on a race car, where I would expect extreme use, extreme temperature swings, and extreme vibration and G loads from cornering and braking, I'd still go with the band clamps I mentioned. They will absorb the differences in thermal expansion, and the specific type of clamp I specified is strong enough and wide enough at the joint to withstand a lot of stress and abuse.
Ok, I'm going to speak to my mechanic again and relay your information. I had heard that using the bands was not a good way to go - potential slipping or leaking,hence welding but you reckon that in this case it may actually be better?
 

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Not every band clamp is good.

The Walker "Mega Clamp" band clamps are good, as are some of the other Walker (and other manufacturers) band clamps with 2 bolts on a band at least 3 inches wide. One bolt goes over each piece of pipe at the joint, and the band is wide and made of reasonably thick (thicker is better here), strong stainless steel or aluminized steel.

Narrower single bolt band clamps and "U bolt clamps" are not sufficient IMO, not even on a lap joint where the pipes overlap.

A welded lap joint with the mild steel over the stainless steel pipe will work reasonably well. The mistakes I've seen are where the stainless steel muffler has stainless "sockets" and someone just jams a mild steel pipe into it and welds it in, or where it's just different pipes being joined, on the upstream side of the stainless pipe, the stainless is expanded and slipped over the upstream mild steel pipe. That's a recipe for a failure, too.

On the upstream side, you'll have the pipes "the wrong way" for optimum flow. That's where a butt joint with a band clamp will be smoother on the inside and flow a little better than a reliable lap joint (with the stainless pipe inside the mild steel pipe).
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Hi all, so it's all done, I'll upload photos and videos asap. They did weld it in on the end and said they had no problem so I'll have to see how it lasts, fingers crossed.

Super happy with it though and very glad I went with the 18" 5x8 as I was keeping my stock resonator as it really is not a huge difference in volume. My wife hasn't even noticed (at least hasn't said anything), so that tells you the volume difference.

That said, It has a lovely low rumble, much more depth to the sound and can certainly hear it's not stock when accelerating.

There's also no drone whatsoever!!

I am actually thinking about upgrading the stock rear resonator to a magnaflow for a bit more bite without gaining any drone although might wait a a little to let the muffler settle in.

Thanks for everyone's help and opinions throughout this process, you've really helped me out!
 
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