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Greetings,
I'm a newbie here, but glad that I found this forum. I have a 2006 Commander (4.7L) with 36,540 miles. I purchased it used (35,500 mi.) and just love the vehicle. I haven't had any problems until this morning. There is absolutely no electrical power. The remote keys will not work, neither will the radio, or even a hint of light from the headlights or interior lights. Everything is dead. I drove the vehicle yesterday, and it started fine, and everything worked well, but when I left the vehicle, and locked it with the key remote, the horn or lights didn't blink, which always work. I'm thinking that it would be pretty unusual for the battery to drop dead that quickly, but will try to start it with my battery charger tomorrow. Is there anything else that I should be aware of? I'm electronically-challenged, and don't know much about modules and such, but would like to figure out why this sudden power failure. Any help is appreciated. Thanks.....Bill
 

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Battery dead - possibly caused by something not shutting off with the sunroof. Mine did the same thing once.
 

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Thanks for the response. I don't have the sunroof, but I've been looking for something that was stuck left on. I'm hoping that it is just the battery.
 

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Once you get the battery charged or jump start it, look around, you might find something left on.
 

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Maybe you have a bad alternator and its not charging the battery properly? If not that then my second guess would be just having a bad battery.
 

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If you have a multi-meter you should check for draw on the battery before taking a new one and killing it. If there is no draw on the battery when you go to hook it up then you can leave it connected. Once it is hooked then you can do as 07 suggested and check for charging. with the engine running you should get around 14volts at the battery terminals. Make sure you terminals are clean. If they have corrosion they could block the power and stop it from charging the battery as you drive.
 

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Sounds to me like the battery shorted internally. This can happen if one or more of the plates inside comes loose and contacts the plate(s) next to it. It's not very common, but it does happen. This could be your problem, especially considering that everything was okay one day and the battery seems completely dead the next day. A battery does not normally go completely dead overnight without being able to recover on it's own at least to the point that it will power some of the lower draw accessories in the vehicle. If it is completely dead, my guess is that the battery is internally shorted.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks guys for the info. I did jump start it this morning with my battery charger, and moved the vehicle into the garage. Without charging, it started up several times, and everything works, which seems strange, considering it was stone dead. I'll see if it will take a charge, and attempt to start it tonight, and if it starts, I'll find my multimeter and see what I'm getting for juice while its running. Someone mentioned $175.00 for the battery?:eyemouth: Would that be from a Chrysler-Jeep dealer? It's a big battery, but I'm thinking I should be able to get a Diehard Deep Cycle battery at Sears for around $100 or so, you think?
 

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Thanks guys for the info. I did jump start it this morning with my battery charger, and moved the vehicle into the garage. Without charging, it started up several times, and everything works, which seems strange, considering it was stone dead. I'll see if it will take a charge, and attempt to start it tonight, and if it starts, I'll find my multimeter and see what I'm getting for juice while its running. Someone mentioned $175.00 for the battery?:eyemouth: Would that be from a Chrysler-Jeep dealer? It's a big battery, but I'm thinking I should be able to get a Diehard Deep Cycle battery at Sears for around $100 or so, you think?

If it keeps giving you problems I would still recommend having the alternator looked at. The only reason I say this is because if the alternator was bad you would still be able to charge the batter and start it to move it around.
 

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If it keeps giving you problems I would still recommend having the alternator looked at. The only reason I say this is because if the alternator was bad you would still be able to charge the batter and start it to move it around.
Yeah, that'll be my next step if the battery checks out and it starts normally again. I really don't want to buy a new battery if I really don't need it. Now where did I put that darned multimeter?:ugh2: I don't use it very often, but when you need it, it'll be in the least likely place (instead of the toolbox!)
 

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Every thing is just considered junk until you throw it out and find out that you need it two days later...one of the many stories in my life
 

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Brickyard?
Batterys that short to open (as TR4 described) don't recover, sooooo.
Although the battery cables probably look ok, I'm inclined to tell you to remove and clean them before replacing anything.

My thoughts,
Rob
Yeah, that was my guess, based upon his description/symptoms. But it still sounds weird that not even a small interior light would illuminate. Something strange seems to be happening...
 

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It could be Main Power Relay, bad Ignition tumbler, or it may be a glitch with security system (most probable). The chip in your key could have temporarily shorted. If it comes to getting A battery, get an Optima Battery, best one if you want a deep cycle, forget Diehard cause when they die- they die hard. lol
 

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Regarding usage of a deep cycle battery.
This is not a real good choice for automotive use.
Deep cycles are designed to release theit power in a relatively slow/controlled manor.
For long life, they actually require deep discharging and slow recharging.
Automotive batterys are designed to give it all, if you will, and do so immediatly if required.
The moment the starter engages, there if often a surge load that can easily exceed 200 amps and frequently does in cold weather.
Also, automotive batterys are designed to accept recharging rapidly and the 120 to 180 amp alternators in autos will do just that.
Lastly, deep cycling an automotive battery will severly shorten its service life.
5 or 6 deep cycles are about all it takes for irreversable damage and the battery will no longer pass the amp/hour test.
This results in a short cranking period before the battery is exausted.
I know many have used deep cycle batterys with success, but likely their experience was the exception or the circumstances that would prove the battery incompatable for that use never occured.
Regardless, deep cycle batterys are for electric low/slow draw situations.
This is not the case for automotive batterys.

Repeating my experiences,
Rob
 

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Regarding usage of a deep cycle battery.
This is not a real good choice for automotive use.
Deep cycles are designed to release theit power in a relatively slow/controlled manor.
For long life, they actually require deep discharging and slow recharging.
Automotive batterys are designed to give it all, if you will, and do so immediatly if required.
The moment the starter engages, there if often a surge load that can easily exceed 200 amps and frequently does in cold weather.
Also, automotive batterys are designed to accept recharging rapidly and the 120 to 180 amp alternators in autos will do just that.
Lastly, deep cycling an automotive battery will severly shorten its service life.
5 or 6 deep cycles are about all it takes for irreversable damage and the battery will no longer pass the amp/hour test.
This results in a short cranking period before the battery is exausted.
I know many have used deep cycle batterys with success, but likely their experience was the exception or the circumstances that would prove the battery incompatable for that use never occured.
Regardless, deep cycle batterys are for electric low/slow draw situations.
This is not the case for automotive batterys.

Repeating my experiences,
Rob

In other words, get the Optima RedTop, it is built to be the main car battery, it's not a deep cycle. The YellowTop is the deep cycle.
 
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