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So the other day I though of the idea to paint, or in my case, tint spray the front headlights excluding the area of where the high and low beam lights would shine through.
I just don't want to risk anything with removing my headlights, baking them, and then having to paint the dull silver area inside the headlight. Ive already measured out the area so that no light will be interfered with so I'm thinking it should work out!

I was thinking of something along these lines except on the outside of the headlight cover. (left headlight in picture)
What do you guys think about the idea?

 

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If you use a tint spray it will probably come out a bit more transparent than that. Also, you'll need to give some careful thought to how you are going to mask the areas you don't want painted and how possible it is to get a clean, sharp line. I'd also consider whether the line between the tinted and untinted part will eventually cause the tint to start flaking.

You might get a piece of clear plastic and experiment with masking and spraying technique before taking it to your real headlights. Also, to test the durability you might mask a circle on a piece of clear plastic and tint around it - then attach that to your front bumper in a discreet place and drive around with it for a few months to see how it holds up.

BTW, where did you find that image? I photochopped that for somebody some time ago to simulate painting the inside of the headlight. :)
 

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I doubt he wants to drive around with a piece of tinted plastic on his bumper for a few months before deciding to do this.

What I would do is make a template and see how the tint affects the light output. Are you going for really dark black?
 

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Discussion Starter #5
If you use a tint spray it will probably come out a bit more transparent than that. Also, you'll need to give some careful thought to how you are going to mask the areas you don't want painted and how possible it is to get a clean, sharp line. I'd also consider whether the line between the tinted and untinted part will eventually cause the tint to start flaking.

You might get a piece of clear plastic and experiment with masking and spraying technique before taking it to your real headlights. Also, to test the durability you might mask a circle on a piece of clear plastic and tint around it - then attach that to your front bumper in a discreet place and drive around with it for a few months to see how it holds up.

BTW, where did you find that image? I photochopped that for somebody some time ago to simulate painting the inside of the headlight. :)
Yeah exactly I didn't think about it flaking but but maybe an extra 1 or 2 layers of protective clear coat going about an half an inch past the tint would possibly do the trick? But I've had my front turn markers tinted for a couple months now and they've been holding up quite well so I think they should be durable enough to withstand debris and dirt, and of course rocks on the highway!

Haha! And yeah I snagged that off your post about a Headlight Assy upgrade made by Oklajeep I believe, Not a bad photchop!
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I doubt he wants to drive around with a piece of tinted plastic on his bumper for a few months before deciding to do this.

What I would do is make a template and see how the tint affects the light output. Are you going for really dark black?
hahaha very true, but I just used a program to measure out perfect circles and carefully used an exacto to cut them. The circles will then be attached maybe with a light removable spray adhesive for where the light will be protruding through, but aside from that the circles are just wide enough so it wont affect the light output of the headlights so it wont matter how dark the tint is! Its like the stencil effect. But I'm probably going to make it pretty dark since it wont really matter the shade.:eek:rangehat:
 

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Why don't you get a piece of plexi-glass from home depot. You can cut it to the shape of the headlight even heat it up and bend it a bit. Then cut the circles in it for the high and low beams. Paint the back side black and two way tape or Velcro them to your headlights. If you velcro you can remove them when you want.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
What tint spray are you using? I tried nightshades on an old headlight and it spray like a greenish tint and didn't darken the area to what I wanted.
I'm using the Nightshades spray tint. I've never had any problems with it and I've done 4 or 5 different sets of lights. Most vehicles have a section of clear plastic where the reverse light is located on the back and tinting over that hasn't ever been a problem. But maybe you had an older type of night shades, because I recently saw the change in design on the can, maybe they changed the tint spray properties or something like that LOL!

Also depending on how old the headlight was and if it had previous discoloration before spraying might also have caused the greenish color

But if it stops raining tomorrow hopefully I can get a start to it and post some pics on how its going!
 

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The guy that's getting ready to paint my turn signals tossed out the same idea of lightly smoking the main area where the headlight shines through and fading it darker (to black) on the rest of the lens.
My biggest problem with this is that the concept only looks good (imo) if you are standing right in front of the jeep; anywhere else and the perspective shows through to the "wrong" part of the housing. I like the idea of removing the lens, painting the inside, and reassembling the unit- I just don't want to go first. :)
For a mock-up, though, I suggest using the 5% static cling tint film you can find at Wal-Mart. I used this when I was working out designs for my tails/turn signals and for $12 it gave a pretty realistic preview of how it can look and possible remaining light output. It was easy to manipulate and stuck on pretty well for about a week.
Here's an old sample of my test run (there's a couple more in the album). Aren't the baby Fortera's cute?
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Why don't you get a piece of plexi-glass from home depot. You can cut it to the shape of the headlight even heat it up and bend it a bit. Then cut the circles in it for the high and low beams. Paint the back side black and two way tape or Velcro them to your headlights. If you velcro you can remove them when you want.
Good idea but I feel like the velcro would make the plexiglass protrude maybe looking a little funky, and with the extra space between the unvelcro'd (spell check please LOL!) area it seems like at high speeds air might catch it and rip it off. But who knows! I'm too lazy to go buy the the stuff anyways and I have the tint spray and materials at home ha!
plus the spray tint will come off with some brake fluid and a bit of rubbing.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
The guy that's getting ready to paint my turn signals tossed out the same idea of lightly smoking the area where the light comes through and fading it darker (to black) on the rest of the lens.
My biggest problem with this is that the concept only looks good (imo) if you are standing right in front of the jeep; anywhere else and the perspective shows through to the "wrong" part of the housing. I like the idea of removing the lens, painting the inside, and reassembling the unit- I just don't want to go first. :)
For a mock-up, though, I suggest using the 5% static cling tint film you can find at Wal-Mart. I used this when I was working out designs for my tails/turn signals and for $12 it gave a pretty realistic preview of how it can look and possible remaining light output. It was easy to manipulate and stuck on pretty well for about a week.
Here's a sample of my test run (there's a couple more in the album):
Yeah good call on the view point perspective. I'm thinking the size circles I'm using should be just enough to not cut out any light, but I'm thinking they're small enough that if you look at them from another angle you should still only be able to the see the chrome finished plastic on the inside of the light.

But thanks!, I'll take a look at that tomorrow in the light and take that into consideration and let you know if it should work out of not.
If I do decide to do this I'll definitely post some pics so you can see!

Oh, and one more thing! I was going to do top and bottom both circles, but I had thought about the option of both being squares or one being a square, one being a circle.
I attached some images of just some test circles and squares to see the look of what the headlight will look like through the tint, what do you(or anyone else who reads this) think of which would look best?
 

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Circle/Circle.
 

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Squares are not for real Jeeps!
 

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Yeah exactly I didn't think about it flaking but but maybe an extra 1 or 2 layers of protective clear coat going about an half an inch past the tint would possibly do the trick? But I've had my front turn markers tinted for a couple months now and they've been holding up quite well so I think they should be durable enough to withstand debris and dirt, and of course rocks on the highway!

Haha! And yeah I snagged that off your post about a Headlight Assy upgrade made by Oklajeep I believe, Not a bad photchop!
I was thinking that the edge between the tinted and untinted parts might be a weak spot, but didn't realize that you clearcoat over the tint. With the clearcoat I think you should be good to go.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
I was thinking that the edge between the tinted and untinted parts might be a weak spot, but didn't realize that you clearcoat over the tint. With the clearcoat I think you should be good to go.
Yeah I like to throw on some of the high gloss stuff! Seems to do the trick and make the lights look even more professional!
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Most people that paint the housing remove the assembly and bake it to separate the lense from housing. Is the commander headlight assembly different than most?
Well on the commander, to paint the inside of the housing you would need to bake it so the glue softens and the plastic lens is removable like most lighting assemblies. But in my case I'm painting onto the lens of the headlight not inside the housing.
 
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