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So I thought I'd share my current predicament and hopefully save someone else the pain...

Last night I parked my XK like normal and pulled the parking brake lever as i always do.... this time i got a snap and a very loose lever.

So this morning i removed the center console and cleaning out the crap that has fallen in the holes and crevices over time, i found a completly snapped cable at the lead ball that holds it to the lever.

Unlike normal cars with the equalizer connection routed outside and under the car. the xk has it routed right under the middle of the second row seat inside the car.

SO this of course leads to removal of the second row since the middle does not tumble foward. Also removal of the second row plastic floor compartment.

After getting to the access hole in the carpet i was able to get to the equalizer and remove the broken cable.

I now have to order the cable which is about 3ft. long from the dealer for $40 :mofo:

Installation is bound to be even more of a pain rerouting the new cable.

Well you might be asking yourself how does this affect me? why should i care this is a freak accident right?

There is a TSB out that every XK should have their parking brake cables adjusted every 30K. Apparently their getting too tight and this happens.

So a warning to all XK owners, get your parking brake cables adjusted or suffer the heartache (and cable break). Especially if you get new rear rotors or notice that the lever is harder to pull at times or notice any change in the way your parking brake lever acts.

Mine would sometimes be stiff to pull or it would randomly snap back into the off position. Other times it would work normal.
 

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Tanx for the tip I don't really use the hand break alot but good to know might help someone else that does.
 

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I now have to order the cable which is about 3ft. long from the dealer for $40 :mofo:

If you haven't ordered it yet, I have a brand new cable sitting in my garage that you can have. When I ordered the e-brake leather covered handle, it came with the cable. I opted to change only the handle for the exact reasons you are stating. :eek:rangehat:
 

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I never really use the parking brake. There is no need to use it if you put the vehichle in PARK. Its got an automatic transmission. It isnt going anywhere.
 

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Actually, it is good to apply it when parked on a steep hill.
You set the brake before putting it in park and this will prevent the trans experiencing 'torque lock'.
Thats what happens when all the weight of the vehicle is being held by the park pawl in the trans.
When you try to put it in gear the lever will be bound and a lot of arm required to get it out of park......along with a rather loud bang when you succeed.
In some cases, they bind so bad another vehicle is required to pull the vehicle with the stuck trans slightly uphill to take the pressure off the park pawl and allow it to release.
Good idea to use it every so often to keep the cables from binding internally as well, even if you are a flatlander like myself.

Rob
 

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Well you might be asking yourself how does this affect me? why should i care this is a freak accident right?

There is a TSB out that every XK should have their parking brake cables adjusted every 30K. Apparently their getting too tight and this happens.

So a warning to all XK owners, get your parking brake cables adjusted or suffer the heartache (and cable break). Especially if you get new rear rotors or notice that the lever is harder to pull at times or notice any change in the way your parking brake lever acts.

Mine would sometimes be stiff to pull or it would randomly snap back into the off position. Other times it would work normal.
How does a cable tighten all on its own?? Not saying your wrong, I'm saying it doesn't make sense to me, whats different with the XK that the parking brake cable tightens on its own?

I've had other Chrysler vehicles with self-tensioning parking brakes, that automatically tension the cable, this has never happened, they don't work that way.

The rear drums or drum in hat e-brake (if you have a 4wheel discs) have their own adjustment. You would have to be ignoring the shoe adjustment and overtighten the cable to compensate for the out of adjustment rear shoes; to create a situation where new rear discs would cause the cable to tighten.

At the same time, I noticed the procedure for adjusting e-brake says to loosen the cable before adjusting the shoes. Which I've never seen before with other vehicles, although I have found a couple of times I did have to loosen the cable when adjusting shoes, probably because I messed up and over tightened the cable in the past.

So, is there something different with the e-brake that causes this in the XK, when it doesn't happen in other vehicles?
 

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What??? The 30000 mile service on the brakes is to adjust them since they are not self adjusting. You didn't notice that the handle was going higher every time you set it? If you don't adjust the shoes you will reach the limit of the cable, therefore breaking it.
 

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It is quite common for park brake cables to 'draw up' or become shorter as they corrode.
See it often in salty Northern Illinois.
On the system found on most rear disc vehicles (small internal drum brake within the rotor) they draw up and sometimes eat the rear shoes right off the webs.
Matter of fact, a member just had this exact experience and virtually poured the remains onto the floor following a bind and break free situation.
On the rear drum systems, at shoe replacement time, you'll often find the equalizer bar holding the shoes off the top anchor stud, indicating the cables must be loosened due to 'draw up'

So, the operators in the non- salt/minimal rust areas of the country sometimes have to tighten the cables due to stretch and those of us in the snow belt have to do the inverse.
I'm always amazed at how different operating conditions can alter maintenence requirements....even after all these years.

As far as the lead ball tearing through.....it happens.....and not just to a Commander.
The OP drew the short straw regarding luck on that one......that or he may be setting it far harder than necessary.

Rob
 

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Actually, it is good to apply it when parked on a steep hill.
You set the brake before putting it in park and this will prevent the trans experiencing 'torque lock'.
Thats what happens when all the weight of the vehicle is being held by the park pawl in the trans.
When you try to put it in gear the lever will be bound and a lot of arm required to get it out of park......along with a rather loud bang when you succeed.
In some cases, they bind so bad another vehicle is required to pull the vehicle with the stuck trans slightly uphill to take the pressure off the park pawl and allow it to release.
Good idea to use it every so often to keep the cables from binding internally as well, even if you are a flatlander like myself.

Rob
I understand if you are parking on a hill but the only other time I would use the parking brake besides that would to pull it everyonce and a while like you said to keep it from binding. There is no need to pull the parking brake everytime you go somewhere and park the vehicle if it is on flat ground.
 

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07 owners manual on page 275 states, "The parking brake Should always be applied whenever the driver is not in the vehicle." And "WARNING always fully apply the parking brake when leaving your vehicle, or it may roll and cause damage or injury. Also be certain to leave the transmission in P (Park). Failure to do so may allow the vehicle to roll and cause damage or injury."

I understand if you are parking on a hill but the only other time I would use the parking brake besides that would to pull it everyonce and a while like you said to keep it from binding. There is no need to pull the parking brake everytime you go somewhere and park the vehicle if it is on flat ground.
You could have edited post #4.
 

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06h?

Darn near every owners manual states to use the park brake every time the vehicle is shut down.
It is a good idea though I suspect it is written more for liability issues, ie, shift cable not adjusted correctly causing the trans to not be fully locked in park.

I remember about 30 years ago Ford had a serious problem with that exact situation.....they'd roll away and you could hear the park pawl clattering in half engagement.
Back in 95, my 95 Impala SS had a recall for shift cable re-adjustment because they also were having a park not fully engaged situation.

Like I said earlier, being a flatlander, we generally just use park.
Add to that, winter use.
We avoid the park brake like the plague during below freezing weather.
If you set the brake at the end of the day, specifically, wet street operation, the cables will freeze in the set position overnight and the brake will not release till it is above freezing.....not so good.
Trouble with that though is when we visit a hilly area, we still don't set it......mostly because it is ingrained to leave it alone....it is a emergency brake.
I think if I lived in the hilly regions I'd lose a car or two before the 'set brake' habit would finally sink in LOL.

Like I said....I'm always surprised by how we have to operate a vehicle differently based on the region we live in.

Rob
 

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It is quite common for park brake cables to 'draw up' or become shorter as they corrode.
See it often in salty Northern Illinois.
On the system found on most rear disc vehicles (small internal drum brake within the rotor) they draw up and sometimes eat the rear shoes right off the webs.
Matter of fact, a member just had this exact experience and virtually poured the remains onto the floor following a bind and break free situation.
On the rear drum systems, at shoe replacement time, you'll often find the equalizer bar holding the shoes off the top anchor stud, indicating the cables must be loosened due to 'draw up'

So, the operators in the non- salt/minimal rust areas of the country sometimes have to tighten the cables due to stretch and those of us in the snow belt have to do the inverse.
I'm always amazed at how different operating conditions can alter maintenence requirements....even after all these years.

As far as the lead ball tearing through.....it happens.....and not just to a Commander.
The OP drew the short straw regarding luck on that one......that or he may be setting it far harder than necessary.

Rob
As iron corrodes, it expands, a cable made up of many stands, as each strand corroded and expanded, the whole cable would fatten up and I could see how that would pull it shorter.

Thanks, I learned something today, and NOW this makes total sense to me.

I live on the Maxon-Dixon Line, a "low Salt" area, plus I have spring ritual of getting soaking wet underneath my vehicles washing the salt out from under them. So I have only seen cables stretch and at worse, light surface rust.

Corrosion would weaken the cable and make it more likely to break as well.

While we are on the subject, let me throw something out to everyone, that is a good tidbit to keep in mind.

The Chrysler DRUM-IN-HAT e-brake that is for the rear disc brakes. You need to keep the shoes adjusted so that there is a good bit of distance between the shoe and drum, NOT like traditional drum brakes where the shoe rides right on the surface of the drum. If you adjust the rear e-brake shoes like traditional rear drum brakes, you'll have the e-brake inadvertently grabbing when the rear discs heat up and expand. All without moving the lever.

I did this on another Chrysler Vehicle with the Drum-in-Hat e-brake. Adjusted the rear shoes so they rode right on the surface of the drum like traditional rear drum brakes. Loved the nice tight e-brake it produced. Then, at highway speed several times I had the rear wheels lock right up.

The FSM for that vehicle said to adjust the e-brake shoes till a slight drag then back it off three notches on the star wheel. The Commander FSM says adjust the e-brake shoes so that they drag slightly, then back it off so that there is NO drag at all. Follow the procedure, these are NOT traditional drum brakes, the real braking is being done by the discs, you adjust them tighter than the FSM says, you'll have them grabbing when you don't want them too.
 

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I'm in LA and had the same issue. My Commander had just passed the warranty and I pulled up to fast once and Snap! I park on a hill and it makes me nervous every time I put it in Park and I roll back to a clunk... I couldn't find the line good to know. My 2nd row seats are coming out as soon as I get the part. Is that freebie still available?
 
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