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Discussion Starter #1
I'm helping my son Fix up a 2007 Commander with 150,000 miles. All on the road.To my knowledge fluid changes and filters are all that have been done.
I was wondering if anyone could tell me average life expectancy of water pump, timing belt, wheel bearings ,etc. Anything I should replace before it goes out on its own is what i'h looking for.Thanks
 

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What Engine/Trans/4WD system?

Fluid and Filter Changes? To most average owners, that is just oil changes. Do you have actual service records that show the preventative maintenance done?

At 150k all fluid and filters should have been changed, that includes trans/axles/xfr case, PS fluid, brake fluid, Coolant.

TPMS sensors in the wheels probably will have the battery go dead soon, you should replace them with the next tire change.

Spark Plugs and Ignition Cable (if your motor has them) will need to be replaced.

Clean the TB and Idle Air Circuit if it has it and NOT drive by wire.

PCV valve would be good to replace as well.

Accessory Drive Serpentine belt will need to be replaced, all three motors have chain driven cams, so no timing belts to replace.

Check your brakes, OEM can last as much as 100k miles, so you're likely on your 2nd set and if they are cheaper brands they may need to be replaced soon.

Water Pump, Wheel Bearings, Ball Joints seem to wear sooner than other vehicles. But, judging from the luck I have had with Water Pump lately, if your water pump is good, most aftermarket would likely fail before the original OEM pump fails.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
The engine is 4.7. I will get vin tomorrow and check trans and 4wd system. I know water pump, wheel bearings. Ignition Cable and ball joints are original. All fulids are up to date.
Right now it is in the shop. Had trans serviced and i think shop screwed up trans solenoid
 

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Trans Solenoid is NOT part of normal servicing, just fluid and filters change. So, was this servicing at the shop to do a repair to the trans, did they do a "flush" of the trans? Because if you brought the vehicle into a shop to just have the normal preventative maintenance performed on the trans, they should NOT have touched the solenoids. What makes you think they screwed up the trans solenoid?
 

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Was the service done at a dealership, if so did they perform the N23 recall? This recall can cause the4wd not to engage in low range.
 

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Trans Solenoid is NOT part of normal servicing, just fluid and filters change. So, was this servicing at the shop to do a repair to the trans, did they do a "flush" of the trans? Because if you brought the vehicle into a shop to just have the normal preventative maintenance performed on the trans, they should NOT have touched the solenoids. What makes you think they screwed up the trans solenoid?
Lots of trouble with shops improperly servicing transmissions and damaging them. I wonder what causes that.
 

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Lots of trouble with shops improperly servicing transmissions and damaging them. I wonder what causes that.
Not sure if your question was rhetorical or NOT. But, trans are more complicated and sophisticated today than yesterday, they have more and more innovative and "different" components and mechanisms than the past.

Lots of shops buy into aftermarket shop tool hype, selling trans flush machines, etc. The machines might have worked with older, simpler trans, but today, the could cause fluid starvation, pressure or back flow problems and damage a trans.

If the manufacturer recommends against flushing a transmission, you shouldn't do it. Sadly, you'll find even Dealerships using these machines even though the FSM they are suppose to be following, say NOT to use them.

Yes, the temptation is there, you would like to change all the fluid in the trans with all fresh fluid when you do a trans fluid change, you can't, half the fluid remains trapped in the transmission. That is why the manufacturer recommends a schedule of changing the fluid with that in mind, if you keep changing half the fluid often enough, there will be more than enough good fluid to keep the trans operating just fine and lasting more than long enough.

The trans is NOT designed to pump the fluid out or have new fluid pumped into it as its operating, something goes wrong with this pumping of fluid in/out, or the trans has different circuits or valving than others, it could damage the trans.
 

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Not sure if your question was rhetorical or NOT. But, trans are more complicated and sophisticated today than yesterday, they have more and more innovative and "different" components and mechanisms than the past.

Lots of shops buy into aftermarket shop tool hype, selling trans flush machines, etc. The machines might have worked with older, simpler trans, but today, the could cause fluid starvation, pressure or back flow problems and damage a trans.

If the manufacturer recommends against flushing a transmission, you shouldn't do it. Sadly, you'll find even Dealerships using these machines even though the FSM they are suppose to be following, say NOT to use them.

Yes, the temptation is there, you would like to change all the fluid in the trans with all fresh fluid when you do a trans fluid change, you can't, half the fluid remains trapped in the transmission. That is why the manufacturer recommends a schedule of changing the fluid with that in mind, if you keep changing half the fluid often enough, there will be more than enough good fluid to keep the trans operating just fine and lasting more than long enough.

The trans is NOT designed to pump the fluid out or have new fluid pumped into it as its operating, something goes wrong with this pumping of fluid in/out, or the trans has different circuits or valving than others, it could damage the trans.
Thanks for the informed response. It is hard to trust any shops, including dealerships, to do quality work anymore it seems. My understanding is that a transmission "flush" as well as incorrect fluid or improperly filling can cause all sorts of transmission problems.

I need to get around to pan dropping mine now that I have crested the 100k mark. I'll likely add a drain to ease future service.
 

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If the fluid level is too high on an automatic transmission, you risk the fluid level reaching the rotating parts and that would whip the fluid into foam, which can cause all sorts of problems for the transmission, including damage. That is why you always see the warning to NOT overfill an automatic transmission. The same principle applies to the engine oil and often you see the warning for engines also.

Keep in mind, they take into account driving up and down hills and sloshing from cornering, etc, so if you do overfill just a little bit, its NOT like your trans is going to blow up right away. The risk of something going wrong from fluid foamy goes up greatly the higher you fill above max.

Some of the new automatics, the Mercedes designed NAG1/W5A580 and ZF trans that come with plugs capping off the fill port, use new approaches to managing the fluid that make them very, very sensitive to overfill. The risk is so high and the fluid level has to be so accurate, that they do NOT trust owners to do it, and thus cap off the fluid fill port with a note on the cap to go to the dealer for service.
 
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