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Discussion Starter #1
I am out of works need to save money and try to replace rear brake service by myself for Jeep Commander 2007, looking for a video clips show you how to do that, anyone know, thank you very much,
 

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I think Sal just did his, shoot him a PM and see if he took pictures
 

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Have you ever replaced disc brake pads before? It isn't much different from vehicle to vehicle, any differences are very easy to figure out and adjust to.
  • Tighten a lug nut on the rotor to hold it in place.
  • Remove the 2 bolts that hold the caliper on.
  • Lift the caliper away from the rotor
    • If the pads are free floating, the caliper should pull away from the pad (Front brakes on Commander)
    • If the pads attach to the caliper, look close how the caliper and pads ride on the rails, might need to rotate the caliper off its position (Rear brakes on Commander)
    • If there is too much clamp from the caliper, or the rotor has a ridge worn into it, and it interfers with removing the caliper, you may need to force the piston a bit back into the caliper to give you space. Use a C-Clamp, I have also carefully used a big screw driver as a lever to force the piston side of the caliper against the rotor and push back the piston a bit.
  • Remove the pads, either from the cradle that holds them or from the caliper (rear commander it would be from the calipers)
  • Clean off the old grease, clean the rotor surfaces and caliper, check the rotor surface for smoothness and thickness, have them re-surfaced or replaced as necessary.
  • Check the condition of the rails the pads ride on, is necessary dress them with a file to true them up. New vehicles, like the commander have metal shims that fit over or in the rails that pads ride on, a quality set of pads will come with replacement shims to install.
  • Reseat the piston back in the caliper, use a C-clamp or special tool with one of the disc brake pads over the piston to compress and push the piston back into the caliper.
  • Check the conditions of caliper guide pins or bushings, they can move back and forth freely but with some resistance. If it appears they need it, grease them by forcing the guid pin out of the rubber boot and greasing it. (Silicone grease may NOT be compatible with the rubber bushings, don't use silicone grease.)
  • Grease the appropraite contacts points, using hi-temp disk brake grease. Be careful NOT to get the grease where it shouldn't be, and NOT use excess that will let if drip where it should NOT be.
  • Install the pads, either in the cradle or on the caliper, put a dab of grease on the contacts points.
  • Re-install caliper and tighten the two bolts.
  • Make sure the rotor is seated, make sure all calipers are installed, then pump the brakes to extend the piston and seat the pads on the rotor. (If you have one of the calipers off the rotors when you do this, the piston will extend all the way, and you'll have to push it back in again.
Never leave a caliper hanging by the brake hose, you'll ruin the brake hose, make sure it is always supported, use a clothes hangar to hang the caliper while its off.

If you use cheap pads, no grease or get the grease where it shouldn't be and/or do NOT resurface or replace rotors if it is needed, it is likely to create brake noise.

Read the instructions that came with the pads, some have special instructions about what material to use, or NOT use, between caliper and pads, do what ever the instructions say. NO instructions, either a thin layer of disc brake grease between them or some of the anti-noise goop.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thank you very much Mongo, will follow your instructions and go from there, I've removed the 2 bolts that hold the caliper on but having a hard time to remove the caliper from the rotor, some how or something there holding that caliper in place, will try it again this weekend, once again thank you for instruction.
 

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There is a clip holding the top of the caliper on. You should see it it's just a bent piece of metal just push down on it and pull the top of the caliper away from the rotor first. I had to hit mine a few times with my hand while pushing that piece down. Same goes for removing the pads from the rotor the out side pad slides down of the caliper I had to hit that a little as well and use a screw driver to get it moving. The inside pad has metal clips holding it in you just pull it straight out. You should see all these clips on your new pads so you know what I'm talking about. That's it bro 30 minuet job no big deal don't for get to re-lube the slides or bolts before you put them back in I throw some on the back of the pads to. Pads lube and the little tool to push the caliper piston back in was less then $60 and I got the ceramics. Autozone has rear pads for $21 but there medal no big deal just which ever your preference is.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Hi Sal,
You have pic or video clip by any chance, could not located that piece of metal clip and thank you much for info, I appreciated it.
 

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There is the clip like already described, but don't forget another possibility you can't get the caliper off;

    • If there is too much clamp from the caliper, or the rotor has a ridge worn into it, and it interfers with removing the caliper, you may need to force the piston a bit back into the caliper to give you space. Use a C-Clamp, I have also carefully used a big screw driver as a lever to force the piston side of the caliper against the rotor and push back the piston a bit.
There could be a bit of a ridge worn into the rotor and it intefers with the pads as you try to pull off the caliper and pads. If that is the case, you have to push the piston of the caliper back in a bit, that will pull the pads away from the rotor and give you some room.

Use a big screwdriver or C-Clamp, heck sometimes you can even do it by hand, but you have to move the caliper realative to the rotor, so that side of the caliper with the piston in it moves toward the rotor surface a fraction of an inch, that will force the piston back a bit.
 
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