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Can anyone point me to where I can get step by step instructions on removing the front and rear rotors so I can get them resurfaced for my 07.
 

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You are going to get new pads as well, correct?

Unfortunately, no one has published a Commander maintenance manual and the Factory Service Manual is too expensive. It should be the same as the same year Grand Cherokee, NOT sure if there is even a manual for that either.

The only thing different from standard pads/rotor job is the cradle for the pads. Instead of everything mounting on the caliper, they have a cradle that wraps on the rotor, the pads ride in that cradle and caliper mounts on that cradle. You'll have to pull off the caliper, take the pads out of the cradle and then remove the cradle to get the rotor off. Its only two bolts that hold on the cradle, so its NOT really much harder than doing any other disc brakes.
 

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In a nutshell :
1. Jack up the Vehicle properly and in a safe manner.
2. Take off wheel (I'm assuming this is easy enough to do on your own).
3. Remove the two inner (larger) bolts holding the entire brake assembly(front), or for the rear the two brake pad bolts which hold all you need to remove rotors. Remove the brake assembly in front, in rear push down metal tab on top of brake pad assembly and pull out similar to the front.
4. Remove the O ring around the axle area with a flat head screwdriver.
5.Pull off rotors. It may be difficult due to rust and dirt. WD 40 or PB Blaster/Break free can help. FOR THE REAR be sure the EBRAKE is NOT on causing brake shoes to press against the inner drum.
6. Replace in the same fashion you took it off.

Not the most detailed but it's not too tuff a job.
 

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FRONT
NOTE: Front rotors and hub/bearings are matched mounted for minimum lateral runout. Before removing the rotor, mark the rotor and hub/bearing to maintain original orientation.


1. Raise and support the vehicle.
2. Remove wheel and tire assembly.




3. Remove the caliper adapter mounting bolts (3) and remove the caliper adapter from the steering knuckle.
4. Secure caliper anchor assembly to nearby suspension part with a wire. Do not allow brake hose to support caliper weight.




5. Remove and discard the o-ring (2) securing the disc brake rotor (1) on the hub.
6. Remove the disc brake rotor from hub/bearing
 

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Doesn't get much better than that. Nice write up SAL. Only beef I've got with it is we might want to keep the o-ring and not discard it unless you have a new one to replace it.
 

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On other vehicles, on the assembly line and only for production purposes, they install a retainer ring over one of the lugs to keep the rotor snug up on the hub, as the vehicle moves down the assembly before calipers are installed. The first time you need to remove the rotors, you'd just discard the retaining ring, its NOT needed, you can do the same thing threading down a lug nut on one of the studs, if its necessary.

Could this "O-Ring" be the same thing? I don't really know, but I can't think of any purpose of putting an o-ring in that location. To seal out water? Why, it would work its way in from other directions more easily. BUT, I really don't know why its there, NOR have I seen it up close to really get an idea of what it might be, and it might be wise to re-install it just in case.
 

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installation


1. Install the rotor (1) on hub studs.

2. Install the caliper adapter (1) on the knuckle (2). Install adapter bolts (3) and tighten to 169 N·m (125 ft. lbs.).


NOTE: Caliper slide pins should be free from debris and lightly lubricated.


3. Install the caliper (1) to the caliper adapter (4) and tighten the bolts to 44 N·m (32 ft. lbs.).
4. Gently lift one end of the slide pin boot to equalize air pressure, then release the boot and verify that the boot is fully covering the slide pin.
5. Install wheel and tire assembly.
6. Remove support and lower the vehicle.
7. Pump brake pedal to seat caliper pistons and brake pads. Do not move vehicle until firm brake pedal is obtained.
 

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STANDARD PROCEDURE
NOTE: A hub mounted on-vehicle lathe is highly recommended. This type of lathe trues the rotor to the vehicles hub/bearing.

The disc brake rotor can be machined if scored or worn. The on-vehicle lathe must machine both sides of the rotor simultaneously with dual cutter heads. The rotor mounting surface must be clean before placing on the on-vehicle lathe. Equipment capable of machining only one side at a time may produce a tapered rotor This type of rotor machining is not recommended.

NOTE: Proper wheel torque is also critical to help prevent any warping of the disc brake rotor.

CAUTION: Brake rotors that do not meet minimum thickness specifications before or after machining must be replaced.
 

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I think he was referring to the link to another area on the forum not you SAL.

It was however pretty informative and couldn't be explained too much easier than that especially with the pictures.
Thanks Sal.

I didn't know if the o-ring did anything so I just put it back in. It does seem pretty useless unless it was used on the assembly line as stated as a temporary item.
 

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From Sal's post:
NOTE: Proper wheel torque is also critical to help prevent any warping of the disc brake rotor.

I think that ring is an assembly item to hold the rotors in place
during production. I too put it back on since it came off in one
piece. Didn't figure it could hurt.

I used the same instructions Sal posted and I had no problems following it. I like picture books.
 

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well I posted the installation instructions for obvious reasons but also was to show that the O ring was not mentioned for putting it back together. So mongo was probably correct that it was used to hold the rotor in place during assembly. But I'm sure its no big deal if you do put it back in.
Step 5 of the removal procedure:
5. Remove and discard the o-ring (2) securing the disc brake rotor (1) on the hub.

Says to discard...I don't follow directions well. I would have made a good
officer....for a short time..........
 

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FRONT
NOTE: Front rotors and hub/bearings are matched mounted for minimum lateral runout. Before removing the rotor, mark the rotor and hub/bearing to maintain original orientation.
I'll be trying front & rear brakes this weekend and am doing a little research when I came across this.

I know it's old but it raised a question for me:
What do I do about the above note when I change the front rotors and there is no orientation mark?


On any past vehicle I have had there was not specific orientation.
So I am hoping with non factory rotors I don't need to put it on a lift and measure run out.....
 

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I replaced my front rotors about a month ago and I did not see anything about the orientation, anyways it was simple up until the point of getting the rotor off, they were really stuck even after wd40 I had a rubber hammer and I hammered it from the back until it came loose, don't be afraid to hit it it does take some really good force before it comes loose and you can take off, the putting on was very simple and now my breaks don't squeak at all.
 

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Step 5 of the removal procedure:
5. Remove and discard the o-ring (2) securing the disc brake rotor (1) on the hub.

Says to discard...I don't follow directions well. I would have made a good
officer....for a short time..........
lol, OK, common sense tells me that you "Can" discard the O-Ring because it is NOT necessary after the assembly line.

I just pulled my rotor to do a wheel bearing, I was like, meh, it can't hurt and I put it back on, and it was convenient in that it held the rotor in place as I put all the brake back together.
I'll be trying front & rear brakes this weekend and am doing a little research when I came across this.

I know it's old but it raised a question for me:
What do I do about the above note when I change the front rotors and there is no orientation mark?


On any past vehicle I have had there was not specific orientation.
So I am hoping with non factory rotors I don't need to put it on a lift and measure run out.....
Doh! I screwed up too, but I replaced my hub with a new one, because the wheel bearing was worn out. So preserving the tolerance stacking of the run-out was NOT going to happen for me.

Well, you get a micrometer and measure the run-out of the rotor and change relative positions on the rotor to get the least run-out.

OR, if you have no problem with your brakes, let it be.

The manufacturers and brake suppliers have been working hard over the years to produce better performing, smoother and quieter brakes, one way to achieve that is the precision they are building them with, which leads to FSM procedures like checking for run-out less than the width of a human hair. You would NOT be the only one ignoring the ultra-precision steps for the brakes and NOT suffering any ill side-effect at all.

In, short, no vibrating pedal, vibrating brakes or noise, Don't worry, be happy!
I replaced my front rotors about a month ago and I did not see anything about the orientation, anyways it was simple up until the point of getting the rotor off, they were really stuck even after wd40 I had a rubber hammer and I hammered it from the back until it came loose, don't be afraid to hit it it does take some really good force before it comes loose and you can take off, the putting on was very simple and now my breaks don't squeak at all.
Applying some anti-seize to the hub and rotor will prevent that in the future, also to the wheel and rotor face, I've had aluminum wheels seize to the steel rotor.

Thing is, see above about the ultra-precision being built into the brakes, you'll find service procedures banning the use of anti-seize between hub/rotor/wheel. Why, because the run out tolerances stipulated to ensure the smoothest quietest brakes, or less than a human hair, so some ham fisted mechanic slathers on a bunch anti-seize on those surfaces and his hair falls out and is caught and held by the anti-seize it could "theoretically" cause it to go out of run-out tolerances.

I put a little on the surfaces and wipe it off with a rag, just leaving the slightest film on the surface, NOT even a film, kinda burnished into the surface. Hadn't had a problem yet, and I've never had a rotor or wheel stuck to hub since either.
 

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Trying to change rotors on 2006 Commander. The e-brake is NOT on but it appears the e-brake shoes are preventing the removal of rotor! How do I disengage??
 
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