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I notice my rotors are starting to warp a lot more now. I don't know if I should take the rotors off and have a shop resurface them for around $10 per rotor or should I just replace them?

I would probably resurface or replace only the front rotors since most of your braking power is at the front.

I am just afraid the rotors might warp again if they are resurfaced.

Any experience on this?
 

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I notice my rotors are starting to warp a lot more now. I don't know if I should take the rotors off and have a shop resurface them for around $10 per rotor or should I just replace them?

I would probably resurface or replace only the front rotors since most of your braking power is at the front.

I am just afraid the rotors might warp again if they are resurfaced.

Any experience on this?
Gonna be a bunch of disagreement here but....
Believe it or not, these are rather meaty rotors.
As long as they only need a cleanup, make parellell cut (your machinist will measure) I believe cutting to be a viable repair.
It's not like your trying to cut out scoring from metal to metal contact so it will be a minimal cut.
I'd go for the resurface....Heck, I've purchassed new rotors that needed a parellell cut.

Rob
 

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If the rotors can be resurfaced, the magnitude of the warp will determine how much they'll need to take off. If the warping is extensive they will not be able to resurface them at all because of the required minimum thickness. I ran into that issue a few months ago. I'd say definitely resurface them, if you can. You cannot really consider whether or not they'll warp again because even a new rotor can warp with excessive braking and heat build-up - i.e. riding the brakes down a mountain in Colorado...(my mistake - haha).
 

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If the rotors can be resurfaced, the magnitude of the warp will determine how much they'll need to take off. If the warping is extensive they will not be able to resurface them at all because of the required minimum thickness. I ran into that issue a few months ago. I'd say definitely resurface them, if you can. You cannot really consider whether or not they'll warp again because even a new rotor can warp with excessive braking and heat build-up - i.e. riding the brakes down a mountain in Colorado...(my mistake - haha).
x2
Like I said, the machinist makes the determiniation.
The minimum thickness spec. is cast into the rotor body.

Rob
 

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Don't think that resurfacing your rotor, is by some means, taking the cheap way out. They are made at a thickness just so you can resurface them. There are some rotors too thin to resurface, but I believe ours have plenty of meat on them, and resurfacing them will not cause them to warp, driving conditions will. When you take them in, they'll mic them and let you know if you have enough metal left to resurface, get the warp out, and still be above specs.
 

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I generally advise against maching rotors, especially today's rotors because they are usually not much more thick than the minimum thickness spec that is stamped into them. Most manufacturers are more interested in saving weight (and increasing fuel economy) these days, so they are more likely to equip their vehicles with rotors that are not as thick nor heavy as the rotors from years ago.

But even if you decide to machine them, keep in mind that any material that is removed makes it that much more easy for the rotors to warp again.

Robby-- Have you ever measured a new rotor's thickness (from a Commander) and have you ever checked the min. thickness spec? I'm wondering if our rotors are actually thick enough to be cut once or twice.
 

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How much should they take off (1 mm)? Will it depend on how bad they are warped?
When I cut a rotor, I try to take off the absolute minimum amount of material. Most guys don't do that though... they're more concerned with getting the job done in one pass, so they're usually going to set the brake lathe pretty tight. The problem with doing it the way I do it is that if the tip of the cutting surface loses contact at any point on either side of the rotor, the rotor must be cut again to ensure a job well done.
 

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TR4,
No, I've never measured a new one.
But seriously, these are NOT lightweight rotors.
Next time you rotate tires you'll see what I mean.

Rob
It's good to know that there are still some decent rotors out there. As you can see, I don't have a lot of wrenching time on the Commander as of yet.

Now my 4Runner is a totally different story. I've done a lot to it over the last 3 years and I've learned quite a bit about it. The rotors on my 4Runner are also very heavy and very thick, but I think that's only because my 4Runner is a Sport Edition, which has bigger brakes with 4-piston calipers. I figured the bigger rotors were just part of the performance brake package that comes on the Sport Edition 4Runner. Now I'm starting to wonder how many other SUVs also have big rotors. Maybe it's more common than I had first thought. I do know that most cars these days come with some pretty thin rotors that are basically throw-aways that really can't be cut.
 

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I would hope most wouldn't just take one big cut, at least I'm sure they weren't trained that way. I always took several thinner cuts to resurface a rotor, and I would hope that there are more guys like us out there, that would do it right, but most are lazy and want the easy way out.
 

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I had mine resurfaced several months ago and before I even got a block away I could tell that they were still warped. The shop told me that they couldn't take any more off and that they were "thin", so they credited the resurfacing costs toward new rotors. I'm not saying that resurfacing wouldn't work for you, just be prepared to go all the way (and agree with the shop up front on the credit if that happens).
 

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I would hope most wouldn't just take one big cut, at least I'm sure they weren't trained that way. I always took several thinner cuts to resurface a rotor, and I would hope that there are more guys like us out there, that would do it right, but most are lazy and want the easy way out.
In most shops, it's all about the time needed to do the job. If the tech is going to have to take extra time to make more than one cut, he might end up losing money on the job. So most guys will just cut once, but deeper than might otherwise be necessary, just to get the job done in one pass and save themselves the time of having to do the cut twice.
 

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I just put new rotors on if they need surfacing ... THEN get the old ones surfaced for next time.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Now I feel a lot better about getting them resurfaced. Is it OK to take it to any shop? We have a Sears auto center that seems to know what they are doing by us.
 

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Is it OK to take it to any shop?
I know my local Pep Boys will turn rotors, I imagine most of your auto parts stores can do it for a decent price.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
How much will a jeep dealer charge per rotor? I might just take it to them.

I will just wait till my pads get worn then I will change the pads and then take the rotors to get resurfaced.

Can't believe my pads are still in great condition.
 

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Now I feel a lot better about getting them resurfaced. Is it OK to take it to any shop? We have a Sears auto center that seems to know what they are doing by us.
Sears always stands behind their work.
 
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