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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I'll be replacing my front hub assemblies this weekend. Although a DIY would be great, I'm mostly interested in confirming the torque specs for all the bolts I'll be disassembling along the way. I've searched already and the information was, um, inconclusive.

When reaching the torque spec for the axle nut, do you have to gradually preload the assembly or can you simply torque the nut to spec? Also, some folks suggest applying sealant to the hub seal to avoid water intrusion. Is this necessary? Thanks!
 

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I'll be replacing my front hub assemblies this weekend. Although a DIY would be great, I'm mostly interested in confirming the torque specs for all the bolts I'll be disassembling along the way. I've searched already and the information was, um, inconclusive.

When reaching the torque spec for the axle nut, do you have to gradually preload the assembly or can you simply torque the nut to spec? Also, some folks suggest applying sealant to the hub seal to avoid water intrusion. Is this necessary? Thanks!

That video is very good and will get you on your way.

The hubs are basically plug and play - there's no reason to add any sealant since they're permanently lubricated, enclosed hubs. I found this in the Factory Service Manual for the three hub mounting bolts:

INSTALLATION
1. Install the hub bearing (3) to the knuckle.
2. Install the hub bearing to knuckle and the 3 bolts then tighten to 115 N·m (85 ft. lbs.).
3. Install the wheel speed sensor (Refer to 5 - BRAKES/ELECTRICAL/FRONT WHEEL SPEED SENSOR - INSTALLATION).
4. Install the wheel speed sensor nut


Here's what the FSM says about the axle nut:

8. Install half shaft hub/bearing nut and tighten to 135 N·m (100 ft. lbs.).

I've never been too OCD about the axle nut since it doesn't hold anything on to the suspension. The axle nut just keeps the CV from sliding in and out of the hub.

Bob
 

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Discussion Starter #4
That video is very good and will get you on your way.

The hubs are basically plug and play - there's no reason to add any sealant since they're permanently lubricated, enclosed hubs. I found this in the Factory Service Manual for the three hub mounting bolts:

INSTALLATION
1. Install the hub bearing (3) to the knuckle.
2. Install the hub bearing to knuckle and the 3 bolts then tighten to 115 N·m (85 ft. lbs.).
3. Install the wheel speed sensor (Refer to 5 - BRAKES/ELECTRICAL/FRONT WHEEL SPEED SENSOR - INSTALLATION).
4. Install the wheel speed sensor nut


Here's what the FSM says about the axle nut:

8. Install half shaft hub/bearing nut and tighten to 135 N·m (100 ft. lbs.).

I've never been too OCD about the axle nut since it doesn't hold anything on to the suspension. The axle nut just keeps the CV from sliding in and out of the hub.

Bob
Thanks for the replies so far, everyone!

Bob, I keep finding conflicting information that the big 36mm axle nut should be 185 ft lb but then there's also information that it should be 100 ft lb, similar to the lugs. I don't want to under or over torque the nut and kill my new hubs. I'm not necessarily doubting you, just confused.
 

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Thanks for the replies so far, everyone!

Bob, I keep finding conflicting information that the big 36mm axle nut should be 185 ft lb but then there's also information that it should be 100 ft lb, similar to the lugs. I don't want to under or over torque the nut and kill my new hubs. I'm not necessarily doubting you, just confused.
I understand - it doesn't make sense that there's so much conflicting info on that axle nut. It's frustrating. I gotta say - 185 ft/lbs is VERY tight and may actually cause what's called "galling" on the threads which is a weakening and stretching of the threads. I can't think of a single fastener on the Jeep that would require that kind of torque - including the cylinder heads. And they contain explosions several times a second :surprise:

The thing about the axle nut is that it is simply there to hold the CV axle snug against the backside of the splined opening in the hub - the nut doesn't secure the hub or any other assembly to the vehicle. The CV axle can't come out of the hub due to it's length; the other end is secured in the front differential with C-clips so it is unable to come out of the diff. The axle nut simply holds the CV axle firmly against the back of the hub - that's why I mentioned that I don't get too particular about the torque specs for it. The three bolts that hold the hub to the spindle? Yep, I make absolutely sure they are to spec since they hold the hub to the spindle and the stress applied to them during acceleration, cornering, etc. is significant and you don't want a hub to come loose - that's a disaster.

The Factory Service Manual for every other Jeep I've had with front CV axles has indicated 100 ft/lbs for the axle nut. If dealer techs are using that spec when they replace CV axles I figure its gotta be fine - the direct liability they have for an out-of-spec torque setting means they're on the hook if something goes sideways.

So just snug the axle nut firmly and you'll be fine - most of the time I don't even use the torque wrench.

Bob
 

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Thanks for the thoughtful reply, Bob, I appreciate it. I have a torque wrench that goes up to 80 ft lbs. My thought is use that to 80 ft lbs and then finish with a cheapo beam type torque wrench to get it within +/- 5 ft lbs. Would that be a decent plan? I also intend to use loctite blue on the nut.
 

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Thanks for the thoughtful reply, Bob, I appreciate it. I have a torque wrench that goes up to 80 ft lbs. My thought is use that to 80 ft lbs and then finish with a cheapo beam type torque wrench to get it within +/- 5 ft lbs. Would that be a decent plan? I also intend to use loctite blue on the nut.
Take it to 80 lbs then just snug it down a little more with a breaker bar - just put some weight to it and it'll be fine.

As for the Loctite... You don't need any. The ONLY suspension components I use Loctite on are on the studs for wheel spacers and bolts for the rear differential. Other than that I just tighten them to spec. The suspension nuts and bolts are subject to so much corrosion since they hang out in the weather and grime that they become a bear to get off later. In fact, I use anti-seize on all the control arm bolts and the clevis bolts on the front end. If you put Loctite on the axle nut there's a good chance it will never come off again. There wasn't any on there when you took it off (assuming it was the original from the factory) so you don't need any on there now.

Hope this helps :thumbsup:

Bob
 

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I replaced a hub on my 95 Dodge 1 ton 4X4 what a mother that was I even had the correct hub puller , that sucker was really froze in there. I saw one puller on Utube and it was a plate welded to a length of pipe that you mounted to the hub lugs then you smack it with a sledge and it worked slicker than crap faster than my puller anyway.

Mark
 
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