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Discussion Starter #1
ok i searched around and really didn't see an answer so i thought i would ask, it has come time to rotate the tires on my 06 commander and being the tightwad i am i prefer to do these things myself. i also had a bad experience with a tire facility overtightening my lugnuts which resulted in some upleasentness down the road. so my question is when you rotate the tires is there anything you need to do to make the jeep reset the values on the tpms system or does it know that you have moved the wheels? and does anyone know the torque values recommended for the lugnuts?

thanks.
 

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You should not have to do anything with the TPMs, I purchased four and installed them on my new rims, put the rims on my XK and everything worked perfectly with no tuning at all. I just tighten lugs by hand and have never checked torque in all my years of driving (and there are al lot of those).
 

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ok i searched around and really didn't see an answer so i thought i would ask, it has come time to rotate the tires on my 06 commander and being the tightwad i am i prefer to do these things myself. i also had a bad experience with a tire facility overtightening my lugnuts which resulted in some upleasentness down the road. so my question is when you rotate the tires is there anything you need to do to make the jeep reset the values on the tpms system or does it know that you have moved the wheels? and does anyone know the torque values recommended for the lugnuts?

thanks.
The computer will "learn" the new positions. May take it several minutes to update.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
You should not have to do anything with the TPMs, I purchased four and installed them on my new rims, put the rims on my XK and everything worked perfectly with no tuning at all. I just tighten lugs by hand and have never checked torque in all my years of driving (and there are al lot of those).
thanks guys, i never ussed to either, always used the grunt method until i had a car where that had a shimmy in the front end around 50-55, replaced every concievable part i could get my hands on until someone who was familiar with that particular model of car told me that the rotors were prone to warping under load if the lug nuts were too tight. the annoying thing was that they were not warped enough to show up with the wheels off the car and tracking this problem down really drove me nuts, since then i generally try to make sure i stay pretty close to the factory torque specs when i tighten the lug nuts, however if you guys have not had any problems when using the good old grunt method then i'll probably just go with that.
 

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With the factory aluminum wheels, I run 95 foot-pounds. After a couple of trips, maybe 50 miles or so, re-torque the lug nuts and they should be set. As a personal preference, I use a small amount of anti-sieze on the lug threads to keep the lugs from rusting and to allow easier lug nut removal in the future. Keep the angular face of both the lug nut and rim (where they mate) clean - no anti-sieze, and they will stay tight.
 
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