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Discussion Starter #1
Got about 60,000 miles on my Commander. In the past, I've towed my travel trailer and the shocks seemed fine. Now it's getting bouncy and the Jeep tends to dance when I go over imperfections in the road. I guess it's time. Have you guys replaced your shocks yet and at what miles? Also, what do you recommend? Thanks, Ken
 

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Typically the conventional rear shocks are getting rather tired after 50k.
The front cartridges, if not leaking, have a long way to go before they require replacement.....not surprising to see those go well beyond 100k.

So, I agree, you likely are due for rears.
If you found the ride and rebound control satisfactory for your needs then I recommend staying with the factory replacement.
Since you tow though, I would say just about any heavier duty shock (such as Monroe) likely would meet or exceed your needs.

Many members here get into some serious off road stuff and they generally look into the high end ORV products......this may be more than you need.

Good luck,
Rob
 

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I am around 66k miles on mine. I put on a 2" lift about a year ago. I lately notice some side to side rock when driving over bumps, so I figure I am due also. Just wonder though, how important is it to replace original shocks with 2" lift shocks, or does it really matter?
 

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I am around 66k miles on mine. I put on a 2" lift about a year ago. I lately notice some side to side rock when driving over bumps, so I figure I am due also. Just wonder though, how important is it to replace original shocks with 2" lift shocks, or does it really matter?
Doesn't really matter on a moderate lift like yours IMO.

Rob
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Robby, I agree with you. I'll go for a heavier duty rear shock. The trailer I tow goes about 5200-5300+ lbs.
 

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Takes less than 15 minutes a side to replace.
If they are NOT rusted and siezed, even then a pro will have air tools that won't let that slow him down.

This is a job you can do yourself very easily and save that money, or buy the tools you need for the job and still save money and add to your toolbox.

Only drawback, undercarriage bolts sometimes rust and sieze, needing big wrenches or they sometimes break, spraying WD-40, or other penetrating oil, on them every day for a couple days in a row, before doing the job, sometimes helps greatly.

Anyway you go, this job is easily done by any independent shop, why pay twice as much for a dealer to do it when there is no benefit what so ever. They don't need their proprietary tools or some greater experience with this brand of vehicle to do the job better.
 

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If they are NOT rusted and siezed, even then a pro will have air tools that won't let that slow him down.

This is a job you can do yourself very easily and save that money, or buy the tools you need for the job and still save money and add to your toolbox.

Only drawback, undercarriage bolts sometimes rust and sieze, needing big wrenches or they sometimes break, spraying WD-40, or other penetrating oil, on them every day for a couple days in a row, before doing the job, sometimes helps greatly.

Anyway you go, this job is easily done by any independent shop, why pay twice as much for a dealer to do it when there is no benefit what so ever. They don't need their proprietary tools or some greater experience with this brand of vehicle to do the job better.
Mongo,
He's in West Palm Beach.......it'll unscrew by hand unless he has parked it in the Gulf.

I would recommend a DIY but in reading the post I am led to believe he would rather just not pay too much to get this service done.

To the poster, BADOS: Am I correct?

Rob
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I moved to MA last summer, so my Commander spend one miserable winter here so far. Who knows how easy or hard the shock bolts are. I'm not looking for the best buy in purchasing the new shocks, only the best heavy duty shock for the money. Monroe makes a heavy duty that would be about $ 320. for the rear replacement.
 

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BADOS,

Check out the Monroe load leveling shocks. I'm running them and am EXTREMELY impressed with their performance.... especially towing. At less than $100 for the pair, they're worth every penny.
 

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I moved to MA last summer, so my Commander spend one miserable winter here so far. Who knows how easy or hard the shock bolts are.
Rust and Seizing of the shock bolts is the big variable, and MA winters definitely are conducive of rusting/seizing up those bolts.

I haven't done the job on a Commander, but have done it on many different vehicle including similar to the Commander.

Typicaly <1' long wrench/socket wrench, you will have to strain a lot, but its possible to remove the bolts. If they are rusted/seized bad, you need a bigger wrench.

A 2' breaker bar, if the nuts & bolts are in good shape very easy. If they are really rusted/seized, you'll have to strain some, I have broken the bolts with a 2' breaker bar.

Breaking Bolts, if its a through bolt, i.e. it has a NUT on the opposite side, (the Lower bolt on the Commander Shocks) is NOT a big deal at all, if you break it, both sides of the broken bolt fall out each side, no big deal, get a replacement bolt from the Dealer/Junkyard/Hardware Store, Make sure it is the same hardness scale if you get it from a hardware store.

Breaking bolts that bolt into the frame, that is a big deal, you have to drill out the section that remains in the frame and you may have mess up the threads, meaning you'll have to do a heli-coil to fix it. Can anyone confirm what kind of bolts on on the top of the shocks for the Commander? Are they through bolts or bolt into the frame.

And last, a trick for the next time, use some blue thread lock. Not that you need the thread to keep it from loosening, but the thread lock will coat the threads and seal them as well and keep out the moisture and prevent the threads from corroding and seizing for the next time you have to take them apart.
 

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BADOS,

Check out the Monroe load leveling shocks. I'm running them and am EXTREMELY impressed with their performance.... especially towing. At less than $100 for the pair, they're worth every penny.
I put these on my Commander, too and am very happy with them. When they told me the price, I thought they were talking individual rather than per pair. I think it was right around $90 with tax included. To fight corrosion coat the threads with anti-seize compound.
 

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To fight corrosion coat the threads with anti-seize compound.
Anti-Seize does have some lube property to it, arguably it could let the bolts loosen up some. BUT, yes, that is a bit bogus, especially a NUT as big as the shocks with that much torque it will stay.

The shock nuts usually have an interferance fit, the last couple threads deformed to resist it backing out. When I had some sort of positive retention measure like that, I'll use the Anti-Seize.

If it doesn't have some sort of positive retention measure, I use the blue thread lock that has worked well also.

If I had to guess, it pretty even, but more often than NOT you'll have less rust or seizing with the anti-seize.
 

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Part Number: SKYN8088

  • 1987-95 YJ Wrangler with 3-4" lift, rear shock
  • 1999-02 WJ Grand Cherokee with 3-4" lift, rear shock
  • 150 PSI Nitrogen Gas Pressurized
  • Feature multi-stage velocity sensitive valving
  • Twin tube construction
  • Oversized piston head
  • Collapsed length (in.): 14.82
  • Extended length (in.): 24.84
  • Shock stroke (in.): 10.02 Skyjacker Softride Nitro shocks are 150 PSI Nitrogen Gas Pressurized. They feature multi-stage velocity sensitive valving, twin tube construction, oversized piston head, internal rebound bumper, 5/8 diameter hardened double chrome rod, urethane bushings & compression control which prevents the formation of air bubbles to reduce fade. Skyjacker has set a high standard of uncompromising quality in the development of this high-performance shock. We use this shock mostly in heavy-duty applications for severe off-road use. It's a little stiff for most street applications. All shocks are white in color and include a red polyurethane boot. Can be used front or rear. Extended length: 24.84" collapsed length: 14.82". Note: These shocks are for suspension lifts only. Shocks will not lift vehicle. *Shocks are sold individually For what it's worth, these cost me $85.71 from "4 Wheel Parts" on the web. Free shipping.
 

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I moved to MA last summer, so my Commander spend one miserable winter here so far. Who knows how easy or hard the shock bolts are. I'm not looking for the best buy in purchasing the new shocks, only the best heavy duty shock for the money. Monroe makes a heavy duty that would be about $ 320. for the rear replacement.

Too bad you don't live here (WPB) anymore, I could of got you a great price on the shocks and install.

I agree with the other guys, if you are mechanically inclined you can do the replacement in an hour or two max. Soaking the hardware a couple days before the work helps a lot and if you had to..........heat. Good luck.
 

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Man you don't even have to be mechanically inclined to change the rear shocks on these vehicles. As long as the bolts aren't seized I can literally have them swapped out in 15 minutes total (5 minutes per side and a beer in between). That's with an impact gun though..... add a few minutes if you need to use a wrench/ratchet.
 

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Wow, I am kind of surprised I haven't been slammed yet for installing Skyjacker Nitros. I was expecting someone to ask if my Commander rides like a buck board now. It doesn't.
 
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