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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I want to replace the stock tires... Daily-driver... Beefier profile? Lettering? What have others done? Photos would be helpful. Thanks!
 

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I think saying the stock tires don't do the Commander justice is an understatement. Also in my experience they are horrible in snow.

You might want to search through the forum's tire threads...there's a lot of info floating around on options, if you have a few hours.
 

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A good option for slightly more aggressive daily driver tires are the Goodyear Wrangler Silent Armors. I had them before on a different Commander and they fit the bill. They looked more aggressive and handled well in snow and rain. I used to drive 90 miles a day during the week and I was very happy with them. Unfortunately I didn't hold on the Commander long enough due to the amount of driving I was doing so I didn't get to experience how they wear down, but I also haven't heard anything bad in that regard.

Like BBCBIRD mentioned, there's plenty of pics and threads in the forum regarding tires so have a look but also do some research into the Silent Armors.
 

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Really? Interesting. I liked my Fortera's. They did a great job. I had no issue with them in snow or mud while doing donuts. If i got another suv just for hauling people and other junk i would buy those tires again.
 

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Coop...I'm glad you've been pleased with them in snow but unfortunately I can't say the same. :)

On two occasions last winter I ended up sliding across the roadway (once ending up backwards and nearly into a ditch), while driving under 25mph on a road I was very familiar with. My tire tread was at about 70%, I'd say. There was about 2" of snow on the road. Just days before, I was driving my non-4WD car on the same road and under the same snow conditions and it wasn't a problem at all. The only difference was the car was front wheel drive and the tire tread was better then 95%.

I really got a bad feeling about the OEM tires based on how they handled last winter. I'm planning to swap to a set of the BF Goodrich KO or KO2, before the snow comes around this year.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I will do some looking around this forum for information. But I also wanted to clarify what I am looking for... I thought there might be a tire that better fills the wheel-well... And has a better looking profile?
 

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You won't find a taller tire that will fit without a lift and possibly some trimming. 245/75R17 is very close to rubbing on a stock setup, but I found that at least with my particular tires, I had zero rubbing, even with some off road and decent compression strokes. Of course, once I installed my lift/spacers, I rubbed on full lock until I worked on the fender liners some. See my thread below of the install pictures on mine otherwise stock.

http://www.jeepcommander.com/forums/showthread.php?t=36441
 

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I want to replace the stock tires... Daily-driver... Beefier profile? Lettering? What have others done? Photos would be helpful. Thanks!

Okay, I can't help it, I've got to be a smart a$$, nit-noid. Those aren't stock tires on that Commander.

The stock tires are Goodyear Fortera's, with black lettering (not white) which is a great all around tire for a stock Jeep that lasts longer than any other OEM tire I have seen.

You mean stock tire size.

Keep in mind, different overall diameter tires will turn at different rpm per speed. This virtually changes your gear ratio's. Bigger diameter tires will result in less torque to wheels. Within an inch or so of overall diameter, it won't be very noticeable, but the taller the tire, the more sluggish the vehicle will be off the line. Also, rotational inertia is much greater than linear, so bigger tires will also be more massive, greater diameter will increase the rotational inertia geometrically, braking performance will suffer as well. The Commander has big brakes, it should be able to handle bigger tires with reason.

And finally, keep in mind the Commander has ESP/BAS/Roll Mitigation/Traction Control, etc. Tire diameter will effect these systems and the computer will read different rpm per speed than it expects, this can cause all sorts of unintended reactions from these systems. The electronics can be reprogrammed with the tire diameter to get these systems to react properly, so make sure you do it, if you switch tire sizes and have a different overall tire diameter.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I took a look at the Goodyear Wrangler Silent Armors... It seems they are only available in black-wall?

A good option for slightly more aggressive daily driver tires are the Goodyear Wrangler Silent Armors. I had them before on a different Commander and they fit the bill. They looked more aggressive and handled well in snow and rain. I used to drive 90 miles a day during the week and I was very happy with them. Unfortunately I didn't hold on the Commander long enough due to the amount of driving I was doing so I didn't get to experience how they wear down, but I also haven't heard anything bad in that regard.

Like BBCBIRD mentioned, there's plenty of pics and threads in the forum regarding tires so have a look but also do some research into the Silent Armors.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Very useful photos... Thanks!

You won't find a taller tire that will fit without a lift and possibly some trimming. 245/75R17 is very close to rubbing on a stock setup, but I found that at least with my particular tires, I had zero rubbing, even with some off road and decent compression strokes. Of course, once I installed my lift/spacers, I rubbed on full lock until I worked on the fender liners some. See my thread below of the install pictures on mine otherwise stock.

http://www.jeepcommander.com/forums/showthread.php?t=36441
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Say what you really think! :icon_razz:

Re-programming a dealer thing? Complicated?

Okay, I can't help it, I've got to be a smart a$$, nit-noid. Those aren't stock tires on that Commander.

The stock tires are Goodyear Fortera's, with black lettering (not white) which is a great all around tire for a stock Jeep that lasts longer than any other OEM tire I have seen.

You mean stock tire size.

Keep in mind, different overall diameter tires will turn at different rpm per speed. This virtually changes your gear ratio's. Bigger diameter tires will result in less torque to wheels. Within an inch or so of overall diameter, it won't be very noticeable, but the taller the tire, the more sluggish the vehicle will be off the line. Also, rotational inertia is much greater than linear, so bigger tires will also be more massive, greater diameter will increase the rotational inertia geometrically, braking performance will suffer as well. The Commander has big brakes, it should be able to handle bigger tires with reason.

And finally, keep in mind the Commander has ESP/BAS/Roll Mitigation/Traction Control, etc. Tire diameter will effect these systems and the computer will read different rpm per speed than it expects, this can cause all sorts of unintended reactions from these systems. The electronics can be reprogrammed with the tire diameter to get these systems to react properly, so make sure you do it, if you switch tire sizes and have a different overall tire diameter.
 

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Say what you really think! :icon_razz:

Re-programming a dealer thing? Complicated?
It's a dealer thing, its NOT complicated, but the dealer will charge you an arm and leg.

A few independent shops may have a tool to do it, many will tell you you have to take it to the dealer. A tire shop might have to tools to do this for you, probably more likely a tire shop than other independent shops will have it.

There is a few tools you can buy yourself that will let you do it, but they'll cost far more than paying the dealer to do it. The flashpaq type tools or AutoEnginuity with the Manufacturer's extended features package.

If they correct the speedometer error, which one input to the electronics changes it for everything, you should be good.

As far as bigger tires hurting performance, search the board, ask others opinions. Keep in mind of they have a V8 or V6. My guess, going up 1" shouldn't be noticeable, 2" might be noticeable but minor, 3" or more you're going to notice and its possible the difference could be great enough to cause quite a bit of dissatisfaction.

Remember, a lot of Jeeps that have monster over sized tires have had the ring & pinion ratios swapped out in the axles to offset the bigger tire diameter. That is very expensive. As well, the Commander doesn't have any after market ring & pinions in different ratios available for it.
 

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As well, the Commander doesn't have any after market ring & pinions in different ratios available for it.
I beg to differ! Since the XK and WK share the same drive train, you can get replacement gears from Nitro.
 

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I beg to differ! Since the XK and WK share the same drive train, you can get replacement gears from Nitro.
Very Cool, thanks for the info!

Keep in mind folks, there is a lot precise labor needed to change ring and pinions out, it is expensive. It requires specials tools and precise measurements and adjustments, this NOT a shade tree mechanic job that most can do themselves, and if you screw it up you tear up differential.
 

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Say what you really think! :icon_razz:

Re-programming a dealer thing? Complicated?
As Mongo mentioned, you can get a Superchips Flashpaq, which will allow you to change the tire size in the computer to correct for these things. As I recall, I paid around $275 for mine. The nice thing about the flashpaq is it will also read codes on the Jeep and other OBDII cars, you can change shift points, adjust for different octane fuel, adjust speed limiters and so on. It also comes with a few higher performance tunes pre loaded that you can try out for a little extra pep in the Jeeps step.

As for performance loss, I looked for a P-metric tire to minimize weight gain along with my other points of importance (road noise, wet/dry grip, white lettering, and appearance). I didn't notice any significant difference in off-the-line performance (I have always felt it's kind of a dog off the line, even with the hemi). Any performance loss at any other speed (that I didn't notice anyway) was more than offset by the 87 octane performance tune from my flashpaq. I've still yet to try the premium tune, but have heard good things.
 

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....The nice thing about the flashpaq is it will also read codes on the Jeep and other OBDII cars,....
Does the Flashpaq only read OBDII codes OR all the manufacturer extended codes?

My impression it was only the OBDII codes and perhaps a few of the extended manufacturer codes.

Keep in mind, only the OBDII codes are what are easily read out on most cars. It was mandated by the Gov, and thus has to be easily accessible and standard among all the makes/models, it is only the emission control codes and the engine codes that effect emissions.

Since 1996, when it was mandated, manufacturer's have put a dozen computers all over the car, that also all have their own codes to diagnose problems. BUT, since they were NOT mandated, the manufacturer does NOT make those codes easily accessible, only some very expensive tools can read those codes. I do NOT think that the Flashpaq can read all the other codes.

If you don't know, the next time you hook up your flashpaq, see if you can read trouble codes for the TPMS, ABS or the Door Module or the radio, etc... Tools that can read all those codes, usually have the option to just scan one subsystem for codes.

I'm thinking the flashpaq can read some or most of the codes for a few subsystems that they reverse engineered it to work with, like ABS or the Transmission. But NOT everything, like you can't get codes for Entertainment systems, body modules or TPMS, etc.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
:thumbsup: Very informative... Thanks!

As Mongo mentioned, you can get a Superchips Flashpaq, which will allow you to change the tire size in the computer to correct for these things. As I recall, I paid around $275 for mine. The nice thing about the flashpaq is it will also read codes on the Jeep and other OBDII cars, you can change shift points, adjust for different octane fuel, adjust speed limiters and so on. It also comes with a few higher performance tunes pre loaded that you can try out for a little extra pep in the Jeeps step.

As for performance loss, I looked for a P-metric tire to minimize weight gain along with my other points of importance (road noise, wet/dry grip, white lettering, and appearance). I didn't notice any significant difference in off-the-line performance (I have always felt it's kind of a dog off the line, even with the hemi). Any performance loss at any other speed (that I didn't notice anyway) was more than offset by the 87 octane performance tune from my flashpaq. I've still yet to try the premium tune, but have heard good things.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
:thumbsup: Also very informative... Thanks!

Does the Flashpaq only read OBDII codes OR all the manufacturer extended codes?

My impression it was only the OBDII codes and perhaps a few of the extended manufacturer codes.

Keep in mind, only the OBDII codes are what are easily read out on most cars. It was mandated by the Gov, and thus has to be easily accessible and standard among all the makes/models, it is only the emission control codes and the engine codes that effect emissions.

Since 1996, when it was mandated, manufacturer's have put a dozen computers all over the car, that also all have their own codes to diagnose problems. BUT, since they were NOT mandated, the manufacturer does NOT make those codes easily accessible, only some very expensive tools can read those codes. I do NOT think that the Flashpaq can read all the other codes.

If you don't know, the next time you hook up your flashpaq, see if you can read trouble codes for the TPMS, ABS or the Door Module or the radio, etc... Tools that can read all those codes, usually have the option to just scan one subsystem for codes.

I'm thinking the flashpaq can read some or most of the codes for a few subsystems that they reverse engineered it to work with, like ABS or the Transmission. But NOT everything, like you can't get codes for Entertainment systems, body modules or TPMS, etc.
 
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