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Discussion Starter #1
Well...

It's official. My Commander has dropped a valve and destroyed the piston and cylinder #3. Was quoted around $8700 for a new motor and install. Not worth it to me, so I'm moving on. Not sure what I'm gonna do with it yet, hopefully I can find someone to take it off my hands for a few dollars.

It was a decent ride while it lasted...

:crying:
 

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Sorry to hear that, @MrFisher. $8700 seems high. You should check around.

.
 

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Happened to me a few years back at 189k. Replaced for a little over 5 k. Going strong at 229k.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk Pro
 

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Well...

It's official. My Commander has dropped a valve and destroyed the piston and cylinder #3. Was quoted around $8700 for a new motor and install. Not worth it to me, so I'm moving on. Not sure what I'm gonna do with it yet, hopefully I can find someone to take it off my hands for a few dollars.

It was a decent ride while it lasted...

:crying:
That's bad news indeed; I can understand you wanting to move on;

That being said, I'm pretty confident you could have a new motor installed for around $6,500 max - and then you'd be set for quite a while. If you buy the motor and have it installed at the same shop you bought it from, you'll typically get a break on the price of the labor.

Whoever quoted you $8,700.00 sure wasn't doing you any favors.

In any event, best of luck with whatever direction you decide to go.
 

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I was quated only $4500 from Jasper for a reman 5.7 and in the high end you should expect 1,500 for labor most quotes were closer to 500 I would shop around or if you have access to tools and knowledge tackle the swap yourself
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I might be looking for an engine to play with in the near future.

Where are you located?
I'm in WA, near Seattle.



The estimate did seem high, and it was a new engine, from Jasper I believe. I'll hang on to it for a little while, see what I can find. It would be nice to keep for a travel/off-road rig. Having that much space to fill with gear and knowing it's a fairly capable 4-wheeler is something I'll miss...
 

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I bought a rebuilt hemi for 3399.00 from power train products and I installed myself but a shop in town (not a dealer) said 1200 to install. it maybe worth a look if you still thinking of what to do. like everyone said 8700 for motor and install seems high.
 

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I bought a rebuilt hemi for 3399.00 from power train products and I installed myself but a shop in town (not a dealer) said 1200 to install. it maybe worth a look if you still thinking of what to do. like everyone said 8700 for motor and install seems high.
That sounds much more reasonable; I'm sure @MrFisher can get a better price if he shop's around a bit.
 

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Do it yourself, that is what I'm doing. Parts will run you about $600-$700 and a new set of heads will be about $600. Take your time and learn as you go. If its only the one cylinder you can replace just that one piston. Be sure to buy a new intake manifold as there are most likely bits of the dropped valve seat in the manifold as well. New manifolds can be acquired for about $300. So, $1500 will just about do it.
 

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Do it yourself, that is what I'm doing. Parts will run you about $600-$700 and a new set of heads will be about $600. Take your time and learn as you go. If its only the one cylinder you can replace just that one piston. Be sure to buy a new intake manifold as there are most likely bits of the dropped valve seat in the manifold as well. New manifolds can be acquired for about $300. So, $1500 will just about do it.
Fair enough Dan;

However, you also have to keep in mind, not everybody is as fortunate as you, to have a nice garage set-up as your own work-shop.

It makes it significantly easier to work on your own vehicle when you have the space, all the proper tools, a lift and an engine hoist at your disposal.

I'm sure you worked very hard for what you have; My point being, you're most definitely in the minority & far more prepared then most, to tackle a job like this.
 

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Fair enough Dan;

However, you also have to keep in mind, not everybody is as fortunate as you, to have a nice garage set-up as your own work-shop.

It makes it significantly easier to work on your own vehicle when you have the space, all the proper tools, a lift and an engine hoist at your disposal.

I'm sure you worked very hard for what you have; My point being, you're most definitely in the minority & far more prepared then most, to tackle a job like this.
Yes, you are correct, BUT there were many years that I didn't have a separate shop with all those things you mentioned. There were many times I was on the floor, on my back under a pair of jack stands changing out a transmission or borrowing/renting an engine hoist and pulling engines in the driveway. My biggest motivation was cost. I simply couldn't afford to have an independent or dealer do the work for me. We, like many other families were raising children and paying a mortgage and my wife didn't make much money, so I was essentially the primary breadwinner. I learned how to do my own vehicle maintenance out of sheer necessity. I borrowed tools from people I knew and bought them as I could afford them.

There is a big reward and personal satisfaction for doing your own work. I understand that some can't and have no desire to do it on their own. I was hoping to teach my son how to work on cars when he was old enough and when he was of age I had him turn a few wrenches, but he doesn't care about cars at all, but he makes enough money now to let someone else do the work for him - and thats okay.

What I see now, however, is the sheer number of folks that can or able to work on their own cars is dwindling at a fast pace. It is rapidly becoming a lost skill among the middle and lower middle class. I see the same thing in residential maintenance. Most people don't want to learn and would just rather pay someone else to do it - and the big thing I have with this is the so-called skilled labor that you employ - they aren't any better than the average idiot, and they don't have a vested interest in doing it right because there is no ownership involved. I could tell you personal stories of my own where both the Lexus and Toyota technicians working on my cars and my son's cars made such glaring mistakes (and then lied to cover it up, except for the Lexus people), that I simply prefer to do things myself. At least I know its done right.

Sorry for the long rant, I don't know why I went down this rabbit hole. Please excuse me...:soapbox:
 

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Yes, you are correct, BUT there were many years that I didn't have a separate shop with all those things you mentioned. There were many times I was on the floor, on my back under a pair of jack stands changing out a transmission or borrowing/renting an engine hoist and pulling engines in the driveway. My biggest motivation was cost. I simply couldn't afford to have an independent or dealer do the work for me. We, like many other families were raising children and paying a mortgage and my wife didn't make much money, so I was essentially the primary breadwinner. I learned how to do my own vehicle maintenance out of sheer necessity. I borrowed tools from people I knew and bought them as I could afford them.

There is a big reward and personal satisfaction for doing your own work. I understand that some can't and have no desire to do it on their own. I was hoping to teach my son how to work on cars when he was old enough and when he was of age I had him turn a few wrenches, but he doesn't care about cars at all, but he makes enough money now to let someone else do the work for him - and thats okay.

What I see now, however, is the sheer number of folks that can or able to work on their own cars is dwindling at a fast pace. It is rapidly becoming a lost skill among the middle and lower middle class. I see the same thing in residential maintenance. Most people don't want to learn and would just rather pay someone else to do it - and the big thing I have with this is the so-called skilled labor that you employ - they aren't any better than the average idiot, and they don't have a vested interest in doing it right because there is no ownership involved. I could tell you personal stories of my own where both the Lexus and Toyota technicians working on my cars and my son's cars made such glaring mistakes (and then lied to cover it up, except for the Lexus people), that I simply prefer to do things myself. At least I know its done right.

Sorry for the long rant, I don't know why I went down this rabbit hole. Please excuse me...:soapbox:
I totally get where you're coming from Dan, I really do.

I'll preface this by saying obviously, I don't speak for everybody here, nor am I trying to;

That being said, I actually do prefer doing my own work when I can, for the very reasons that you stated;

However, I also know my limitations. I could probably do almost any/all the work on my XK, given the right amount of time, the right tools, the space and the proper resources.

Unfortunately for me, I have a job that literally has me traveling out of the state & often out of the country, about 10 months out of the year - on average - some years more than that;

Translation - I don't have the time - or the patience for that matter, to be tackling big mechanical jobs on my XK, not to mention that I simply don't have the knowledge base, quite honestly; That's not to say I couldn't learn at some point - but my extreme lack of free time & patience, greatly reduce the likelihood of that happening anytime soon;

Maybe when I retire in 8 years or so, and I'm home every day, it may become a different story. For now, with the limited time that I do have home, I like to enjoy it with my boys & my girlfriend, spending some time outdoors, fishing & camping. I'll tackle the smaller simple jobs on my Jeep, but, I'm just not willing to waste a week of my time working on my XK, trying to tackle a large job, that I know I'm not equipped to handle right now;

Fortunately, I make enough money, where paying someone else to do it for me, is not an issue.
 

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I totally get where you're coming from Dan, I really do.

I'll preface this by saying obviously I don't speak for everybody here;

That being said, I actually do prefer doing my own work when I can, for the very reasons that you stated;

However, I also know my limitations. I could probably do almost any/all the work on my XK, given the right amount of time, the right tools, the space and the proper resources.

Unfortunately for me, I have a job that literally has me traveling out of the state & often out of the country, about 10 months out of the year - on average - some years more than that;

Translation - I don't have the time - or the patience for that matter, to be tackling big mechanical jobs on my XK, not to mention that I simply don't have the knowledge base, quite honestly; That's not to say I couldn't learn at some point - but my extreme lack of free time & patience, greatly reduce the likelihood of that happening anytime soon;

Maybe when I retire in 8 years or so, and I'm home every day, it may become a different story. For now, with the limited time that I do have home, I like to enjoy it with my boys & my girlfriend, spending some time outdoors, fishing & camping. I'll tackle the smaller simple jobs on my Jeep, but, I'm just not willing to waste a week of my time working on my XK, trying to tackle a large job, that I know I'm not equipped to handle right now;

Fortunately, I make enough money, where paying someone else to do it for me, is not an issue.
AL, I completely understand your position. Thanks for sharing!
 
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