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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
After this past weekend of wheeling and seeing the nice mud tread that 07JeepXK has, I have decided that I need something new also. The Kumho Venture KL71 tires are the ones I have been looking at and I am thinking I will be ordering them in the very near future. I have loved the Kumho brand ever since I bought the first set and have had no reason to switch. The only issue with the previous set of tires I had was that they were a load range C and I think range E would have suited the XK better.
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The pic of your current tires look like a good all around road / highway tire, but as you say, not good in mud, not enough open tread. The second look better but still don't look to be a real aggressive mud tire, but then, you need to drive on the road too.

As to the load range, I personally think load range E is overkill. I've used them on HD pickups in past when hauling heavy loaded 4 horse gooseneck trailers. I don't see the weight load on your XK and I think they will kill your gas mileage. Just my opinion.
 

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Sweet Tires

I too am in the market for new tires. I think the KL71's would be a bit of an overkill for me. I am leaning more towards the GY Wrangler Silent Armors due to their ratings in snow and ice which I deal a lot with in WI. Also, I tow a trailer regularly on snow covered roads on a regular basis in winter to go snowmobiling. With that said, the tread patter on the Kumho's are bad a$$! Go for it, you know they will look sweet on your XK! Can't wait to see more pics.
 

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I actually saw those Kumhos on TireRack yesterday. They didn't get such great reviews when it came to snow and ice traction. Take that into account if you're running the same tires year-round.
 

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I didnt realize that those were the mud tires that you were refering to. I had done a search last week when you mentioned the Kumho Mud tires and it showed me a different tire. I guess they have more then one.

Not to scare you away from this tire but when we had the Ford Ranger before the Commander I read a lot of bad reviews from the guys on the forum. Who knows though. There were a lot of bad reviews on the Bridgestone Dueler REVO's too and I thought they were one of the best all terrains that I have used!

My new MT/R's Im running are a Load Range C. I dont know much about the Load Ranges of a tire. Whats the difference between a C and a E. I noticed that one of the rock crawlers at RC had 38x12.5 BF Goodrich Krawlers in a Load Range C.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks for the all the input from everyone. I had a set of the old style Kumho M/T and they were close to the same tread design. I like the alternating lugs on the sholders to help with deep mud and snow. And the center section looks like it would be a good design for around town and for loose dirt or sand. I have to laugh at the fact that they rate tires for ice traction. Other than a studded tire or one with chains on all tires get about the same traction on ice or hard packed snow
 

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So when are you going to pull the trigger and get new tires? Do you plan on running the same size that you are currently running?
 

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I have to laugh at the fact that they rate tires for ice traction. Other than a studded tire or one with chains on all tires get about the same traction on ice or hard packed snow
I have to respectfully disagree with that statement. I personally have had a wide range of experiences on hard pack snow in particular and yes, ice too with different tires. The greatest difference I noticed was on my wife's current vehicle, a Volvo XC90 SUV. The stock Michelins were what you would expect on hard pack snow and ice - loosey goosey. I did some research and swapped rubber on her "truck" with Goodyear Assurance Triple Treads. These things are amazing. Even on hard pack when making a turn, you are hard pressed to get them to break traction, even when giving the steering wheel a hard jerk while turning. I had never experienced that in all my winter driving. Now those tires wouldn't work for any off road worthy XK, but I'm just trying to make a point. After experiencing that, I take the snow and ice rating a little more seriously...............Just my 2 pennies.
 

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I have to respectfully disagree with that statement. I personally have had a wide range of experiences on hard pack snow in particular and yes, ice too with different tires. The greatest difference I noticed was on my wife's current vehicle, a Volvo XC90 SUV. The stock Michelins were what you would expect on hard pack snow and ice - loosey goosey. I did some research and swapped rubber on her "truck" with Goodyear Assurance Triple Treads. These things are amazing. Even on hard pack when making a turn, you are hard pressed to get them to break traction, even when giving the steering wheel a hard jerk while turning. I had never experienced that in all my winter driving. Now those tires wouldn't work for any off road worthy XK, but I'm just trying to make a point. After experiencing that, I take the snow and ice rating a little more seriously...............Just my 2 pennies.
X2

I was amazed how well the Bridgestone Dueler REVO AT's performed on hard packed snow and ice. It was a night and day difference between the REVO's and the stock Fortera's. We had a huge ice storm in MD right before I got out in february and there was a huge hill that I had to go up to get to work that was nothing but a layer of ice. The Commander walked up the hill like it was dry out. A well siped tire works wonders.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I am going to run the same size as I have now because they spec out the same as my current tires and I do not want to throw out my current spare since it has never touched the pavement. The only difference is the tread width. I want to get them as soon as possible so I am thinking that I will order them today or tomorrow, they will only take a day or 2 to arrive.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I understand what you are saying about the difference between a straight tread tire on ice vs. a m/t tire or a tire with interlocking tread on ice. My feeling is that if the ratings are in place they should be 0 to 1 because no tire will make an icy road feel like a dry road. I agree with you both that there is a difference in ice and snow handling from one tire service category to the next but I doubt that any M/T is going to be too much better or worse than another.
 

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Once you get them make sure you take lots of pictures!
 

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You really don't need a load range E tire under a Commander. They are made more for the 3/4 & 1 ton crowd - an LT load range C is more than enough. Plus, to carry that much weight, the tire has to be inflated to 60 + pounds - which would make for a rough ride on a light vehicle.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
It seems that most people say it is not necessary to have a load range E but is there any disadvantage to having the E instead of the C?
 

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The only thing I could think of is possibly a stiffer side wall but I could be totally wrong.
 

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Discussion Starter #16 (Edited)
Ordered the tires. They will arrive either Friday or Monday. happy b-day to me!(tomorrow) :)


 

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Tires with a higher content of silica work very well in hard pack or icy conditions. They don't wear well on dry pavement, however. A tire with a high silica content will feel 'sticky' even in very cold weather. Siping helps too, of course. A good snow tire will fill its voids with snow and hold it there. You can stick a snowball to another snowball, but you can't stick a snowball to rubber. That is the theory behind holding snow within the tread, that it will "stick" to the snow on the road. Case in point - my factory JK mud terrain take-offs have too big of voids to hold snow. They are no where near as good in the snow as my BFG all terrains which have tighter voids and substantially more siping.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Tires with a higher content of silica work very well in hard pack or icy conditions. They don't wear well on dry pavement, however. A tire with a high silica content will feel 'sticky' even in very cold weather. Siping helps too, of course. A good snow tire will fill its voids with snow and hold it there. You can stick a snowball to another snowball, but you can't stick a snowball to rubber. That is the theory behind holding snow within the tread, that it will "stick" to the snow on the road. Case in point - my factory JK mud terrain take-offs have too big of voids to hold snow. They are no where near as good in the snow as my BFG all terrains which have tighter voids and substantially more siping.
That is a really great way to explain that! That makes sense and now I can see where the snow ice ratings would come from. I never really thought about it but now I see why siping is important. I think that the tight tread in the middle and the siping on the out side lugs on the 71's will be enought for me, after all it rarely snows in Jersey anymore.
 

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Happy Birthday!
 
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