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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I have been working on removing one of the front rotors which appears to be rusted on the hub. I tried spraying WD-40 behind the rotor in hopes it will come in contact with the rust. Then I used a hammer and just started banging away and by hitting around the lug bolts since I plan on resurfacing the rotors.

Does anyone have any tips??? The Commander has 57,000 miles and almost 4 years old and I know the brakes has never been serviced so that explains the rust behind the rotor.
 

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I usually replace my rotors, so when I need to get them off I just hammer from the back side until it breaks free. I am always impressed with how strong a bond a little surface rust can form! Since you are trying to retain your rotors, I would say enjoy a beer and then go to town with a rubber mallet. Good luck!
 

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Striking the edge sometimes helps. I just changed mine, and I hit the back are with the caliper off in that area. Spin the rotor around in different posisions, while hitting it. I also used a 5lbs sledge. Put anti-seize on the back side of the rotor, around the center opening, to prevent this from happining the next time.
 

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You could always apply a little heat to the mounting area of the rotor.

Propane torches are very handy when working on vehicles.

EDIT: Just use common sense when doing this. Be careful not to ruin the abs sensor or wheel bearing/hub assembly.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Finally after 2 hours with a couple of breaks, the drivers side rotor is off. Now I just have to remove the passenger side. I ended up also using a rubber mallet to strike behind the rotor on the contact surface as well.

I will post a How to tomorrow with some pictures even though Romeo posted the steps from his service manual.
 

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I use a little bit of the stuff designed to break the rust bond- just squirt in a little and wait. If the doesn't work then I put in a little more carefully and light it up, it is flammable and that seems to break the tougher bonds along going nuts with a rubber mallet. I wouldn't try the lighting it though just a redneck removal trick.
Last time I did all four rotors only one was stuck really good. I just had to take full throttle swings with a rubber mallet along with heat, that was the driver side front, the rest just broke free with little trouble.
 

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Add to your required tool list.
Ooooold mechanic elixer....crushes rust.
50/50 mix ATF AND Acetone (your wife/GF will hate me, that is fingerpolish remover)
DO NOT GET IT ON ANY PAINTED SURFACE!
It will turn white and stay that way.
Use a brush, paint it around the studs and hub....re-apply about 2 minute intervals.
This solution will crack the rust.
A couple of well placed hammer blows on the mounting face between the studs will cause the rotor to spring off the hub.
Extreme cases do indeed require heat, but an older sage than I, passed this one down to me.....it works.

Rob
 

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I have a giant gear puller I use for this :)
 

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Add to your required tool list.
Ooooold mechanic elixer....crushes rust.
50/50 mix ATF AND Acetone (your wife/GF will hate me, that is fingerpolish remover)
DO NOT GET IT ON ANY PAINTED SURFACE!
It will turn white and stay that way.
Use a brush, paint it around the studs and hub....re-apply about 2 minute intervals.
This solution will crack the rust.
A couple of well placed hammer blows on the mounting face between the studs will cause the rotor to spring off the hub.
Extreme cases do indeed require heat, but an older sage than I, passed this one down to me.....it works.

Rob
It is refreshing to have a real (and humble) mechanic on a forum, thanks for the tip.

This can be so frustrating sometimes, x2 on the propane torch, I go straight for heat now anytime I'm working with seized components.

But you have me actually wanting a seized rotor now to try the ATF/acetone. Maybe this spring when I do the rears.

Speaking of the rear rotors, anyone else's rear rotors wear down faster than the fronts? Our 06 Commander has around 58k on the originals and the rears will need replacing first. I found this surprising, considering the old adage that the fronts do 85% of the braking work. Mechanic at a chain tire store in MI told me it is not uncommon for that to happen on a newer cars.
 

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I can't say the same for other/newer cars but our Commanders do show some rear bias, noticed mostly by those who brake lightly.
They seem to, for the most part, wear the rear pads faster than the fronts and most have noticed the brake dust buildup is worse on the rears.
Rather thick rotors though.....you may be seeing a rust line developing around the rotor perimeter, causing it to appear step worn.

Rob
 

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Just want to thank all for the info. Did pasenger side, heated up the lug area, and beat the rotor with a 3 lb. hammer. Had a problem getting rotor over the rubber o ring, and used a pry between the rotor and the suspension(even is a spot to fit a peice of 3/4 copper about 14ins. long).........make sure to take rubber oring off before the rotor or you will have to replace it like me.......Thanks again
Joey Jeepster:eek:rangehat:
 

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Put anti-seize on the back side of the rotor, around the center opening, to prevent this from happining the next time.
Chrysler Recommends against this, at least earlier vehicles, I could be wrong on the Commander, but the brakes look to be same basic design as the other Chrysler's they recommend against it.

The thinking is, that the run out spec for the rotor is less than the width of a human hair. So, grease or anti-seize can capture a hair and it would NOT be noticed and it could cause the rotor to be out of spec for run out.

What I've done for years, put a little anti-seize on a rag and rub it in, burnish it in sorta, on the back of the rotor, less than even a film, more of the surface stained with anti-sieze. Never had a problem with rotors sticking to the hubs after that, NOR never had a run-out problems, and I easily did more than a dozen brake jobs with combined 400k miles using this technique.

I did get a run out problem on my Neon R/T, and I though I might have been wrong about burnishing in a little anti-seize against recommendations, BUT, it turned out to be a bent hub that was throwing off run-out. I can't imagine how using anti-seize contributed in any way to getting a bent hub, so I think its a safe thing to do, even if NOT recommended, just keep it to a tiny amount, rub it in and rub off all the excess.
 

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I used a hammer too couldnt get it. I used the friend with same hammer method. Seems like a friend will swing harder at my Jeep then I care too!
 
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