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I think I'm about to take on rotor/pad replacement on my 2006 Commander...I've read through the threads on brake replacement here and thank all those who've helped others by posting the how-to information.

One torque figure I can't find is the recommended torque for the lugnuts when re-installing the wheels when the job's done...can anyone point me in the right direction?

tnx.

Craig
 

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I use 95 ft lbs. That is what the dealer recommended but 100 works fine too.
 

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I have Spidertrax wheel spacers on my XK. Spidertrax recommends to torque wheels to 90 ft lbs. I've had them installed for over two years now with many hardcore off road trips and never had a problem with any lug nuts coming loose.
 

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I have NOT seen a specific figure for the Commander, although I haven't looked very hard, but every figure I have seens for all the Chrysler vehicles I have owned has been to the effect of 95 ft-lbs +/- 5 ft-lbs. I have set my torque wrench to 95ft-lbs and toqued down my Chrysler wheels slowly (moving the torque wrench quickly can throw off the actual torque it clicks) in a criss-cross pattern, for 5 lugs, that makes a star pattern. I've never had a problem, BUT, the Commander is my first vehicle with bigger than 15" wheels.

I also install the lug nuts dry, and only seen official recommendations to do it that way. The lube can through off the results of the torque wrench and you can over torque the fasteners. I had a '91 Mini-Van that I always liberally lubed the lug nuts before torqueing them down, all the lug nuts and studs went bad, deformed threads. I replaced all of them on the Mini-Van, but kept doing the lube thing and after several tire rotations, the new lug nuts/studs were bad again. I switched to keeping them dry, after replacing them all again, and never had a problem again.

You'll find folks that will tell you, they use lube or anti-seize on the studs/lug nuts all the time, and never have a problem. I don't doubt them, it may vary from vehicle to vehicle, but the recommendation is torque the lug nuts dry.

Something like wheels, its often the torque that is best for the fastener that is specified, i.e. you toque down the wheel as tight as the fastener can safely handle the torque. I could be wrong on that, but if you look up the recommended torque for a stud the size that is on your commander, likely it is the same as the recommended torque for the wheels.

Of course, like everything, we don't know more than the designer and/or manufacturer, look up their recommendations and follow them, they trump any other advice you would get.
 

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do you want the same ft lbs for wheels and the spacers? or have more ft lbs on one or the other??
What does the spacer manufacturer recommend? Sorry, NOT the answer you were looking for, but if someone that doesn't respond, I think you need to e-mail or go to the manufacturer's website and see what they recommend.

Did you have to install longer studs to use the spacer? Or is this one of the spacers that bolts to the hub and then the wheel bolts to the spacer?
 

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SpiderTrax recommends 100 ft/lb. As Robbie said, this would be for the wheels as well. When I initially put the spacers on, it was all I could do to remove some of my lugnuts, even using a 3/4" breaker bar/deepwell socket! Dreaded air guns! They were probably a "little" higher than 100 ft/lb. :eek:rangehat:
 

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SpiderTrax recommends 100 ft/lb. As Robbie said, this would be for the wheels as well. When I initially put the spacers on, it was all I could do to remove some of my lugnuts, even using a 3/4" breaker bar/deepwell socket! Dreaded air guns! They were probably a "little" higher than 100 ft/lb. :eek:rangehat:
Yea, air impact wrenches really do a number on the lug nuts, they are so inconsistent with torque you can expect a shop that uses them will over torque the lug nuts greatly. The only way to install wheels is to use a torque wrench, at the very least, if you do NOT have a torque wrench, the vehicles lug wrench seems to be designed to apply close to the proper torque if an average strength male uses it to tighten the lugs as hard as he can without straining greatly.
 

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SpiderTrax recommends 100 ft/lb. As Robbie said, this would be for the wheels as well. When I initially put the spacers on, it was all I could do to remove some of my lugnuts, even using a 3/4" breaker bar/deepwell socket! Dreaded air guns! They were probably a "little" higher than 100 ft/lb. :eek:rangehat:
Thats funny because I still have my installation instructions for my 1.25 inch Spidertrax wheels spacers and they say right on there torque to 90 foot pounds.
 

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Just don't over torque them past 100 lbs

I just had to pay for 5 new studs and lug nuts because the Jeep dealership over-torqued the hell out of my front passenger wheel when they replaced my hub a couple months back.

I didn't find this out until yesterday when I was getting my wheels/tires balanced at a local shop and the mechanic said my threads are over stressed and unsafe to reuse. I am going to contact the Jeep dealership and press for a reimbursement. They know well not to mess with me after the crap I went through the first time they worked on my XK.
 

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Just don't over torque them past 100 lbs

I just had to pay for 5 new studs and lug nuts because the Jeep dealership over-torqued the hell out of my front passenger wheel when they replaced my hub a couple months back.

I didn't find this out until yesterday when I was getting my wheels/tires balanced at a local shop and the mechanic said my threads are over stressed and unsafe to reuse. I am going to contact the Jeep dealership and press for a reimbursement. They know well not to mess with me after the crap I went through the first time they worked on my XK.
It is OK to use a impact wrench for tightening as long as a torque stick is being used.
They look like a extension but have a plastic coating over the length of the tool.
The color signifies the maximum torque the stick will permit......so, if it is a 100 ft.lb. stick, for example, you could lay on the trigger as long as the compressor will keep up with it and if you put a torque wrench on it, it will tighten further just as you break over 100 ft.lb.
The tool absorbs the impact 'hit' at the prescribed value.

I've grown fond of this because of the inaccuracy that develops over time, of a conventional torque wrench......I have mine readjusted annually (Snap On) even though I reset them back to zero after every use.

For the threads on the lug stud to begin to stretch you can bet they were in the 150 ft.lb. range.....good grief!

Rob
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Thanks all for the torque discussion -- sounds like I'll be safe with the 100 ft/lb figure.

Craig
 

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Located in the "How to change a flat tire" section, my owners manual recommends 95 ft*lb for the lug nuts. However, like Robby has mentioned 100 ft*lb will work as well.

Robby: I didn't know torque wrenches should be stored at their lowest setting. Now I have to remove mine from the tool box and adjust it. :)
 

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Located in the "How to change a flat tire" section, my owners manual recommends 95 ft*lb for the lug nuts. However, like Robby has mentioned 100 ft*lb will work as well.

Robby: I didn't know torque wrenches should be stored at their lowest setting. Now I have to remove mine from the tool box and adjust it. :)
Torque Wrenches use springs and inclines/balls to break away at a certain force. So I guess the theory is, like with other things with springs, its always best to stow them with the spring relaxed, i.e. set the wrench to zero torque.

Its also been shown that quality springs can spend years compressed and loose little to none of their force gradient.

robby would probably know better, take his word over mine, but I "think" the biggest reason torque wrenches need to be re-calibrated is for internal wear that will change the value of force that the internal parts break-away, to give you the Click to tell you, you reached the desired torque.

Of course if the spring force gradient has changed, that will change the calibration, but I don't "think" a good quality spring is going to loose that if you leave it compressed a while. I just think its more a case of, if their is argument that one way is better than another, and NOT much effort to do the better, then why NOT, do the better, i.e. set your torque wrench to zero before stowing it.

There is the same debate with Firearms, and people debating if they should disassemble their weapon extensively to relax all the springs before any long term storage. Its been shown that it is unnecessary, BUT, you'll still see weapon owners store their weapons in a state where all the springs that can be practically relaxed are done so.
 
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