Jeep Commander Forum banner

1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
480 Posts
The few times I pulled trailers on stock rear springs, the back squatted significantly. I wouldn't tow anything over 3k lbs with it stock.

The best thing you can do to set up your rig for towing is to get a weight distributing hitch. You'll gain stability and reduce the squat. You can also run Monroe Load Levelling shocks to help a bit more with squat.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
224 Posts
Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
Shocks

The few times I pulled trailers on stock rear springs, the back squatted significantly. I wouldn't tow anything over 3k lbs with it stock.

The best thing you can do to set up your rig for towing is to get a weight distributing hitch. You'll gain stability and reduce the squat. You can also run Monroe Load Levelling shocks to help a bit more with squat.
I believe squatting is more of a function of tongue weight, our rigs are rated for 720 lbs tongue weight (minus what crap piles up in the back, etc.), but that is what I am concerned about, buncing, bumps etc. on the rear suspension traveling up and down the road.

Pulling spec, is 7,200 lbs, but I'm going to be pulling 5K.

I will look into the "weight distributing hitch" vice the stock hitch i have. And yes, I will add the monroe leveling shock for now.

Thanks for your response.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
480 Posts
I believe squatting is more of a function of tongue weight, our rigs are rated for 720 lbs tongue weight (minus what crap piles up in the back, etc.), but that is what I am concerned about, buncing, bumps etc. on the rear suspension traveling up and down the road.

Pulling spec, is 7,200 lbs, but I'm going to be pulling 5K.

I will look into the "weight distributing hitch" vice the stock hitch i have. And yes, I will add the monroe leveling shock for now.

Thanks for your response.
The squat was partially tongue weight and partially the weakness of the stock springs and shocks. I saw 3" of squat with my stock springs with 150k miles, nearly new Bilstein 4600 shocks, and a double axle trailer loaded to about 3k lbs. I could pick up the tongue myself, so tongue weight was well under 720 lbs. I had nothing loaded in the back of the Jeep, so all squat was a result of the trailer. I also felt significant bouncing over harsh bumps, but never felt the Jeep get unstable. I only towed for around 40 miles and never went over 60mph, though.

The rated 7200 lbs/720 lbs tongue is for a weight distributed hitch. The fact is, our stock suspensions are designed for ride quality, not towing, so without proper weight distribution over all axles you're going to see a lot of squat and I'd question stability at highway speeds.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
5,766 Posts
Ok, thanks for the info. like you say, i'm sure after 10 years my suspension has weakened up some.
I'm not saying you are doing this @vjsimone (you've already mentioned tongue weight as one of the primary issues) but a lot of people in general misconstrue towing capacity & trailer weight with how much your rear end will sag when towing a trailer.

It's actually the tongue weight of the trailer that has the biggest impact on how much your rear springs will sag while towing - the less tongue weight the better; If you have a 5,000 lb trailer, you would probably ideally be shooting for around 200 - 250 lbs of tongue weight.

Depending on your trailer type, the tongue weight can be adjusted by repositioning where the axles are mounted, in relationship to the frame of the trailer - if your axles are too far back, you're going to have a lot of tongue weight which is not ideal. Moving the axles forward, more towards the center of your trailer will lighten your tongue weight significantly. The weight distribution hitch you mentioned would also help.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
480 Posts
I'm not saying you are doing this @vjsimone (you've already mentioned tongue weight as one of the primary issues) but a lot of people in general misconstrue towing capacity & trailer weight with how much your rear end will sag when towing a trailer.

It's actually the tongue weight of the trailer that has the biggest impact on how much your rear springs will sag while towing - the less tongue weight the better; If you have a 5,000 lb trailer, you would probably ideally be shooting for around 200 - 250 lbs of tongue weight.

Depending on your trailer type, the tongue weight can be adjusted by repositioning where the axles are mounted, in relationship to the frame of the trailer - if your axles are too far back, you're going to have a lot of tongue weight which is not ideal. Moving the axles forward, more towards the center of your trailer will lighten your tongue weight significantly. The weight distribution hitch you mentioned would also help.
Adding onto this, it's best to have most of the weight over the axles, but make sure you favor a front weight bias over a rear weight bias. Adding too much weight behind the axles can cause fishtailing, especially on a vehicle with a short wheelbase.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
224 Posts
Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
Just an update;
Replaced the rear shocks with the; MONROE – SENSA-TRA/C LOAD ADJUSTING SHOCK ABSORBERS
Needed new tires, so I put on the Maxis 10-ply tires.
I might replace the rear springs as well.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
155 Posts
Just an update;
Replaces the rear shocks with the; MONROE – SENSA-TRA/C LOAD ADJUSTING SHOCK ABSORBERS
Needed new tires, so I put the Maxis 10-ply tires on.
I might replace the rear springs as well.
I ended up putting AirLift Load Assist Rear Springs in. What a difference, hardly any sag and then evened out with the weight distribution hitch. Helped with the lean in cornering with every day driving also (4" superlift). The airbags do kill rear articulation as a downside.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
5,766 Posts
Just an update;
Replaced the rear shocks with the; MONROE – SENSA-TRA/C LOAD ADJUSTING SHOCK ABSORBERS
Needed new tires, so I put on the Maxis 10-ply tires.
I might replace the rear springs as well.
If you're towing 5,000 lbs, I'd definitely replace the rear springs.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
206 Posts
I am not a fan of the Sensatrac shocks. I had a set on my Commander and had some real issues. The real problem is that rear shocks on the Commander are not meant to carry weight. The design of the mounts are made to only control the damping and movement of the wheel and axle assy. not carry any load. The rear upper shock mount really is not strong enough to carry much weight and the overload spring design of the Sensatrac can cause the top shock mounts to wear through. That is what my mounts did. I had to rebuild the mounts and weld reinforcements to these mounts. The Sensatrac shocks also squeeked very loud after a while and drove me crazy. I would be very careful to check the shock mounts regularly if you are going to tow with Sensatrac shocks. Since I had these problems I have replaced all my springs with heavy duty OME springs all around and have Bilstein 5100 shocks. I use air bags in the springs(taller than std. airbags) and have a weight distribution hitch when I tow my camp trailer.

Dan
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
224 Posts
Discussion Starter #16
The rear upper shock mount really is not strong enough to carry much weight and the overload spring design of the Sensatrac can cause the top shock mounts to wear through. That is what my mounts did. I had to rebuild the mounts and weld reinforcements to these mounts.
Yeah, not much material there...
 

Attachments

1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top