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Discussion Starter #1
I think it's common knowledge that the Commander brakes suck. I've had 2 of them now and they don't exactly inspire confidence. Heck, the magazines peg it at 140+ feet 60-0.

Anyway, I'm looking for a moderate upgrade to the stock brakes. Probably front and rear - pads, rotors and calipers.

Let me know any other ideas or opinions on this.

Thanks.
 

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Brake Pads

The better the brake pad the shorter the life of the rotor as the more metalic particles in the pad the faster the rotors wear out.
I understand you wanting to stop faster but don't be shocked if you are replacing rotors more often.

Swanny
 

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The brakes on ours weren't that bad. I just had to replace pads and rotors at the front. One caliper hung and wore the inner pad down to the backing plate on the left side.

From the factory, these Jeeps got Akebono ceramic pads. If you replace them with those pads or similar, the brakes are as good or better than any truck of similar weight. Have you driven a Suburban or Yukon XL? Or an Expedition or Excursion?

I just replaced our pads (which were crappy aftermarket pads installed by the second owner, and we're the third owner) with Bendix CT3 pads. I also rebuilt the left front caliper myself (new seals, new pistons, new pins and boots, fresh grease in the pin bores). I'm happy with the brakes now, and the Bendix CT3's do seem to be an improvement over what we had.

There are a lot of aftermarket pads which don't perform as well as the stock pads. A high quality ceramic pad (Akebono, Bendix CT3 and Wagner ThermoQuiet all get good reviews) helps braking performance. I even considered Hawk LTS pads, which are probably a bit "grippier" and might stop a bit better, but with more dust and potentially more noise issues. I've used Hawk pads on other vehicles, including a set of LTS pads on a Suburban, and they do offer more braking for less pedal effort.

Flushing the fluid at least every two years is a good thing, too. That keeps the pedal firm.

I'm not a fan of drilled and/or slotted rotors. They wear pads very quickly, and they don't really offer much advantage if you're running good brake pads. If you're running cheap pads, you'd get better bang for your buck with good pads than with drilled and/or slotted rotors.
 

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I just put all new drill/slot PowerSlot rotors on mine with ceramic pads. Braking power is pretty good.
 

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I didn't drive it much prior to the change but they weren't bad as far as I could tell. However, the performance with the new brakes is quite impressive. Everything is new though.
 

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I just put all new drill/slot PowerSlot rotors on mine with ceramic pads. Braking power is pretty good.

I didn't drive it much prior to the change but they weren't bad as far as I could tell. However, the performance with the new brakes is quite impressive. Everything is new though.
Hey @Flex;

I'm curious, which kit did you order?

I ordered this brake upgrade kit which is waiting for me when I get back to the states;

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B005UB4WSA/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o02_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

Power Stop K2220-36 Front & Rear Z36 Truck and Tow Brake Kit;
 

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I used that exact kit with the Z36 pads. I have used them before on a 1999 ram 2500 and a 1989 Mustang convertible. No complaints.

As to the drill/slots, they reduce heat and thus the possibility of warpage. They are also lighter than a solid rotor improving acceleration. I have been using them for many years on 6 different vehicles and have yet to notice any premature wear. I used ceramic pads. Perhaps if a cheap quality semi metallic pad is used, it may result in accelerated wear.
 

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One thing to consider if going to slotted/drilled rotors is the chance of debris such as a small stone getting caught in them. If someone does a fair amount of off-roading, then if a stone gets hung up in the rotor, it will chew a pad up pretty quick as well as possibly starting a crack in the rotor
 

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I used that exact kit with the Z36 pads. I have used them before on a 1999 ram 2500 and a 1989 Mustang convertible. No complaints.

As to the drill/slots, they reduce heat and thus the possibility of warpage. They are also lighter than a solid rotor improving acceleration. I have been using them for many years on 6 different vehicles and have yet to notice any premature wear. I used ceramic pads. Perhaps if a cheap quality semi metallic pad is used, it may result in accelerated wear.
That's good to know.

There have been some questions raised by some other members here as to how the rotors would hold up over time.

Good to hear from someone who has actually used them on a truck before.

Thanks for the feedback.
 

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One thing to consider if going to slotted/drilled rotors is the chance of debris such as a small stone getting caught in them. If someone does a fair amount of off-roading, then if a stone gets hung up in the rotor, it will chew a pad up pretty quick as well as possibly starting a crack in the rotor
With the rims I'm running, that's virtually impossible.
 

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Power Stop K2220-36 Front & Rear Z36 Truck and Tow Brake Kit

Very happy with these myself after a couple of thousand miles. Noticeable difference especially when towing. Very linear pedal feel. I flushed my brake system at the same time.
 

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The 1999 Ram 2500 has had them on for 2 years. My brother's and I hunt in the fall and see a fair amount of off road. Last year the area where we were hunting required driving in on trails for about 10 miles. Never had any problems despite very rough and variable conditions from gravel to mud etc. I am not saying it's impossible, but the holes are pretty small so it would take a bit of effort. I will try to post some pictures later. With the newer rims and spacers, the stance is about 2 inches wider.
 

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The Brembro's would be interesting. What are the benefits? Larger rotors and 4 piston calipers?
Oh yeah, and for a lot less than $4500 for a Brembo big brake kit. I'm doing mine for around $1200 but if you get lucky, know where to look, and get cheaper rotors and pads, you can do the swap for around $600-$800 for all 4 corners. I'm just gathering parts quickly and getting Baer rotors and pads, which is why mine is gonna be so expensive. Plus who doesn't like a little extra stopping power for their 3 ton monster anyway? I know I need it.
 

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Well, they have been on the Comamnder for about 2500 miles now. City driving, highway driving and several trips down the hunting trails. I would say about 100 miles down them. Conditions were very dry this year. Pictures are front and rear.
 

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Side shot showing the lift from the OME springs and the 2011 Grand Cherokee rims with 1.5" spacers. You can see the approximately 2 inch wider stance.
 

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Well, they have been on the Comamnder for about 2500 miles now. City driving, highway driving and several trips down the hunting trails. I would say about 100 miles down them. Conditions were very dry this year. Pictures are front and rear.
Looking good to me, thanks for posting the pics Flex.
 
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