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Glad you're ok. Good luck with your repair. Are you going to tell us the story?
 

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Looks like the tire came off. What happened ?
 

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Looks like the lower ball joint came apart and the steering knuckle seperated from the lower control arm? Am I correct?

Did you have any symptoms before hand or was it the result of damage from an accident or hitting riding over something to violently?
 

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Discussion Starter #5
The story, well er...

We were driving home from our holiday in france, my wife insisted in driving all that day. At dunqurke we were looking for the hotel, saw it and took a right turn to what looked like a small roud round the back of the hotel. That happened to be a sliproad coming off a dual carriage way, naturally we were going the wrong way. As we realised this we slowed to crawling speed, thinking about how to get out of this situation. Then that little White van in the picture came around the corner and Just didn't notice us until the last moment (the car behind did straight away). So it was our fault, not a tres anglais mistake as I am sure many frenchmen have driven down that slip road too, but we were unlucky. Also the guy in the van stank of alcohol. Nevertheless it is our fault. At least no one was hurt.
 

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Sliproad = access ramp/road to/from a limited access highway
Dual carriage way: four lane limited access divided highway, interstate/motorway style

Both are British terms.

He was going the wrong way on the highway and was trying to turn around when a van and a car were exiting the highway. The van hit them, the car didn't, but it was their fault since they were going the wrong way on the exit ramp.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Nicely put jr. The prospect of turning around didn't really occur, these French exit roads are narrow and totally blind due to trees. Pulling over was the best immediate course of action. What happened was a shame, but not uncommon in France. It didnt help the the other driver smelt strongly of alcohol, but the police did not seem interested in that. The real mistake was missing the sign that this road was one way, there was no signage at the junction. The next time I'm over I'll have a drive round to see how we missed it. Also when you're traveling through so many countries in europe road layouts don't seem as obvious as they do on home turf. There are many things both me and my wife can learn from this, fatigue is the biggest factor.

The jeep is back in the uk now, we will see if it is written off or not...
 

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Best I can tell from the distant photo is you took a direct hit into the wheel.
Most likely the knuckle, (the aluminum casting going from upper to lower ball joint, and tie rod connection point) has broken allowing the wheel to come off and pulling the right front driveshaft apart.
If the subframe isn't bent and the upper control arm mount point within the inner fender is not altered, you probably have a fairly straightforward fixer.
Consider the broken knuckle a good thing as its destruction likely took the energy out of the impact.

Good luck,
Rob
 

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Also when you're traveling through so many countries in europe road layouts don't seem as obvious as they do on home turf.
Most cities in Europe pre-date the automobile by 500 years or more, in the U.S. the automobile pre-dates most of our cities by 50 years or more.

Most of us Yanks would be even more confused than you when it comes to navigating European roads.

I have taken taxi rides in Italy, Naples and Rome, that out right scared me. Never got the opportunity to drive in Europe myself, judging from what I saw in taxi's I was thankful to ride the train and take taxis.

I've driven in Isreal, Iraq and Saudi Arabia, those were remarkably similiar to the U.S., but since those nations having exploded in infastructure about the same time as the U.S. it makes sense they ended up being simliar to the U.S.

Some of the Europeans & UK folks on exchange tours, I knew, have said the U.S. roads are more common sense and much easier to drive. That is the advantage of being a young Nation with young Cities, we got to start closer to a fresh sheet of paper and did NOT have to try to convert old ox cart dirt streets in an ancient city into a modern road, without knocking down half the buildings in the city, like most of Europe was cornered into for decisions.
 
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