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What dates do you plan to attend?


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Welcome to the Official WC Camp Commander 2010 Thread. This thread will contain all the information you need for attending this event.

WC Camp Commander 2010 will run from Jul 17 to July 24th in the San Juan Mountains of Colorado. The base camp will be set up at the Red Mountain Motel in Silverton, Colorado. Information on lodging can be fond in the following posts.

Please only vote in the attached poll once you have made your reservation and know what dates you plan to attend. we will then try to plan the most popular events around the majority attendance but everyday will be a good day to run these beautiful trails. If your plans change do not worry about it the poll is not a firm commitment. THIS IS A PUBLIC POLL SO YOUR SELECTIONS CAN BE SEEN BY OTHERS!

Countdown to WC Camp Commander
 

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Once again we will be staying at the Red Mountain Motel in Silverton Coloardo. When you call to make your reservations make sure to them them you want to be with the "Camp Commander Group"


I have blocked out 10 sites in the new section; Sites 21 through 25 & Sites 33 through 37. These site are all together and run $38.00 per night (full hookups).

I you want you can request any other location when you make your reservation. The water & Electric only sites are $35.00 per night but we could not all be together so I blocked out the other section which is on hold for ONE WEEK ONLY and those spots will be released on February 23rd. You must give a credit card at the time of your reservation but you will not be charged until the date of your stay. You can cancel up to two weeks prior with no charges so I would suggest that you make reservations if you are considering this event and then cancel later if your plans change.





1 big cabin w/kitchen sleeps 5 $158.00 a night
4 cabins with Queen & full Bed $118.00 a night
3 cabins with full & bunk bed $98.00 a night
9 Motel rooms w/kitchen (king or Queen) $108.00 a night
2 motel rooms with 2 full & 1 queen $98.00 a night



Full Hook ups $38.00 a night / Water & Electric only (different then our group location) $35.00 a night

The toll free number to Red Mountain Motel is 1-888-970-5512.

You can see their web site at http://www.redmtmotelrvpk.com/
 

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Confirmed Members: UPDATED: 6/01/10 @ 1130

1) a49erFan - 16th through 24th (departing on the 25th) / Space #22
2) Consolidation - 17th through 23rd / Space #20
3) HueyPilotVN - 16th through 24th / Space #24
4) Wanderingts - 16th through 21st / Space #25
5) sturg78 - 17th through 24th
6) RockyMountainCanary - 17th through 24th / Space #23
7) brendon - 18th through 22nd / Room #3
8) ped4599 - 18th through 23rd / Space #16
9) bjamrow - 16th through 18th / Tent Site
10) Greenlantern - 18th through 20th
11) USMCMP - 21st through 22nd
12) Paulbeau - 24th
13) TYMAC - 20th through 22nd
14) ElCid - ?

Members who have indicated interest in Black Bear Pass

1) a49erfan
2) ped 4599
3) consolidation
4) brendon
5) Greenlantern
6) USMCMP
7) El Cid



Members who have indicated interest in this event:

1) a49erFan
2) HueyPilotVN
3) Commander Drako
4) Consolidation
5) 6CO
6) Adondo
7) PolarBZ
8) [email protected]
9) MPRMNC
10) TYMAC
11) RockyMountainCanary
12) Beach'n Jeep
13) Midnight
14) Brendon
15) bjamrow
16) dddonkey
17) Old McDonald
18) Urbancrawler
19) Bigmaninds
20) Sturg78
21) El Cid
22) Shocker
23) Wanderingts
24) ped4599
25) USMCMP
26) Greenlantern
27) paulbeau
28) Airdog625
 

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PROPOSED Daily Schedule: Revised 06/01/2010

July 16: Early Arrivals and Set up (no planned trail rides)

July 17: Red Mountain Mining Area (easy), Clear Lake (easy), Ouray Trip (if desired)

July 18: Stony Pass (easy)

July 19: Anamis Forks Ghost Town (easy), California Gulch (easy), Hurricane Pass (easy), Corkscrew Gulch (easy)

July 20: Two Trails:

Group #1) Black Bear Pass (difficult) / Ophir Pass (moderate)

Group #2) Ophir Pass, Alta Lakes (moderate)

July 21: Yankee Boy Basin (moderate) / Imogene Pass (moderate) / Telluride

July 22: Engineer Pass (moderate) / Cinnamon Pass (moderate)

July 23: Kendall Mountain (moderate)

July 24: To be determined if anyone is left in camp

July 25: Departure (no planned trail rides)
 

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Door Prizes & Giveaways: Updated: 04/06/10

last year we had some really great prizes and everyone who attened left with something, If you have a product you would like to contribute this year please let me know and we will add it to the list in this post.

1) 4xGuard is offering up a set of Aries tail-light guards (El Cid)
2) $50 (tire) / $100 (wheel & Tire) Discount from Discount Tire (Every Participant at WC Camp Commander will receive one of these)
3) Two Camp Commander Button Up Shirts (size XL & XXL) (TYMAC)
4)
5)
 

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A little information about the area:

Welcome to Silverton, Colorado!

Or, as one local puts it, "Silverton: A gritty little mining town with Victorian pretensions!" Once the stomping ground of silver kings and railroad giants, Silverton survives today as one of Colorado's most endearing destinations.

The Silverton district opened legally to miners in 1874, following the Brunot Treaty with the Utes. An estimated 2000 men moved into the region that year. They came from across the U.S., many parts of Europe and even China, to endure severe winters and dangerous mining conditions in their pursuit of the minerals they hoped would make them rich.

Not all who settled were miners. By 1875 the 100 "sturdy souls" who lived in Silverton proper worked in the post office, sawmills, blacksmith shop, mercantile, newspaper, liquor stores, smelters of assay office. The town's population grew to 500 by 1876. Life was not easy for any of them. Statistics from Silverton's cemetery note causes of death in early Silverton as 117 from snowslides, 143 from miner's consumption, 161 from pneumonia, 138 from influenza (most in the 1918 epidemic) and 202 from mine accidents.


San Juan Mountains
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Highest point Uncompahgre Peak
- elevation 14,309 ft (4,361 m)
- coordinates 38°04′18″N 107°27′14″W / 38.07167°N 107.45389°W / 38.07167; -107.45389

The San Juan Mountains are a rugged mountain range in the Rocky Mountains in southwestern Colorado. The area is highly mineralized (the Colorado Mineral Belt) and figured in the gold and silver mining industry of early Colorado. Major towns, all old mining camps, include Creede, Lake City, Silverton, Ouray, and Telluride. Large scale mining is now uneconomical in the region, although independent prospectors still work claims throughout the range. The last large scale holdouts were the Standard Metals operation near Silverton, which operated until late in the 20th century and the Idarado Mine on Red Mountain Pass that closed down in the 1970s. Another hold-out was the ill-fated Summitville mine on the eastern slope of the San Juans.

The Summitville mine was the scene of a major environmental disaster in the 1990s when the hastily installed liner of a cyanide-laced tailing pond began leaking heavily. Summitville is in the Summitville caldera, one of many extinct volcanoes making up the San Juan volcanic field. One, the La Garita Caldera, is 35 miles (56 km) in diameter. Large beds of lava, some extending under the floor of the San Luis Valley, are characteristic of the eastern slope of the San Juans.

There is some tourism in the region, with the narrow gauge railway between Durango and Silverton being an attraction in the summer. Jeeping is popular on the old trails which linked the historic mining camps, including the notorious Black Bear Road. Visiting old ghost towns is popular, as is wilderness trekking and mountain climbing. The San Juans are extremely steep; only Telluride has made the transition to ski resort. Purgatory (now known as Durango Mountain Resort) is a small ski area north of Durango near the Tamarron Resort. There is also skiing on Wolf Creek Pass at the Wolf Creek ski area. Recently Silverton Mountain ski area has begun operation in Silverton. It is a highly rated extreme ski area and is currently available by reservation only.

The Rio Grande rises on the east side of the range. The other side of the San Juans, the western slope of the continental divide, is drained by tributaries of the San Miguel, Dolores and Gunnison rivers, which all flow into the Colorado River.

The San Juan and Uncompahgre National Forests cover a large portion of the San Juan Mountains.
 

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Optional Trail Ride:

Black Bear Pass
San Miguel County, Colorado

Nearby Towns: Telluride, Ouray, Silverton
Nearby Trails: Imogene Pass, Ophir Pass, Bullion King Lake, Red Mountain Pass
Trail Length: 9.23 miles
Elevation: 9,066 to 12,859 feet

This is one of the most famous trails in the state and for good reason. It's beautiful and slightly terrifying. You travel from south of Ouray to Telluride over Black Bear Pass, around Ingram Basin, and across Ingram Falls to encounter some deadly switchbacks.

The trail starts out at a large area to air down just off the highway. You climb almost immediately and start working your way to the pass. Keep going to your right if you can't tell which trail is correct. It makes sense if you keep trying to get to the top of the ridge and to Black Bear Pass.

Once you get to the pass at 3.2 miles you are treated to a beautiful view and lots of open space. The trail starts down the pass and you work your way around a shelf road with Ingram Basin and Ingram Lake below you. Ingram Peak looks over the scenery here.

Don't go down into the basin valley -- continue along the shelf. Soon you'll be able to catch your first glimpse of Telluride far below, and you'll be able to see Telluride almost all the time until you finally reach it.

The switchbacks start soon after you leave Ingram Basin. There are a few different lines to take but they're all about the same difficulty. They keep getting tougher as you follow Ingram Creek.

At 6.5 miles the switchbacks above the creek become their most terrifying. This is perhaps the most unnerving part of the trail, contrary to what you may have read in other reports. It is a shelf road of rock with loose sand on it and you must go downhill at a steep angle, turning to your right at the bottom. The entire time all you have in front of you is Telluride thousands of feet below you. Go slowly and carefully. You may not want to tackle this hill if it is wet, as it has claimed the life of at least one wheeler.

When you get around the corner the trail becomes shelf road and even widens a bit. You come around the corner to actually drive over a shallow part of Ingram Falls. You can get out here and take pictures, though there really isn't anywhere to get out of the way if there are others behind you (the trail is one way here).

After passing a mine that is almost lost to the elements you begin more tight switchbacks of loose dirt and rocks. The tightest switchback is here and one you have probably read about. Don't get too close to the edge (it's loose) and take it slowly, backing up as often as you need to.

There are more switchbacks and each one gets a little wider. Eventually you end up at the Bridal Veil Falls Powerhouse and a gate. This is private property though you can walk a bit closer. There is a sign stating you should not block the gate or roadway, but there is room to pull over after the switchback at the Powerhouse, past the sign stating the trail is one way past that point up to the top.

There is a great place to park on a big switchback where you can hike a short distance to stand in the spray at the bottom of Bridal Veil Falls. Here, you can truly appreciate how far the water falls to to the pools at the bottom. This brief but rocky hike is highly recommended.

Work your way down the switchbacks and you will find yourself in Telluride at the Pandora Mill. This is the main street in town.

Low-End Rating: 4
High-End Rating: 5


Rock Crawling: 2
Dirt & Mud: 1
Water Crossings: 3
Playgrounds: 1
Cliffs & Ledges: 5
Climbs & Descents: 4
Elevation: 5
Scenery: 5
Other Activities: 5

The Ratings -- What Do They Mean?

Every trail description on TrailDamage.com will have a Rating Box. This is a gray box to the right side of the page that details many different aspects of the trail.

Low-End Rating: The lower end of the scale showing the easiest this trail ever gets. This is how difficult the trail will be if you take all bypasses around obstacles and always take the easiest route through every area (while still remaining on the trail). The scale is from 1 to 10, with 10 being the most difficult.

High-End Rating: The higher end of the scale showing the hardest this trail ever gets. This is how difficult the trail will be if you take on all obstacles and always take the most difficult route through every area (while still remaining on the trail). The scale is from 1 to 10, with 10 being the most difficult.

Rock Crawling: The amount of rock-based obstacles. These include all kinds of rocks -- smooth obstacles with steep drop-offs, bumpy hills made of rock, and rock-strewn riverbeds and canyons. The scale is from 1 to 5, with 5 representing the highest amount of rock crawling. These numbers are represented with red Jeep icons.

Dirt & Mud: The amount of dirt or sand available on the trail rather than rock or water. Mud may occur only when the weather creates it or it may be year-round mud. The scale is from 1 to 5, with 5 representing a very high percentage of dirt rather than other driving surfaces. These numbers are represented with red Jeep icons.

Water Crossings: The amount of water on the trail. This includes all kinds of water crossings -- from small puddles to streams, creeks, ponds and lakes. The scale is from 1 to 5, with 5 representing the highest amount of water. These numbers are represented with red Jeep icons.

Playgrounds: The amount of available play areas rather than trail only. Playgrounds can be large or small areas of rock, sand, dirt, water or other surfaces fun to play on. They are either near the trail or a widened part of the trail. The scale is from 1 to 5, with 5 representing a high amount of playground areas. These numbers are represented with red Jeep icons.

Cliffs & Ledges: The amount of cliff faces and steep ledges. These are areas where the trail will run alongside and if you were to fall off you would be seriously hurt or killed. This also represents narrow ledges where it is possibly dangerous. The scale is from 1 to 5, with 5 representing the highest number of cliffs and ledges. These numbers are represented with red Jeep icons.

Climbs & Descents: The amount of steep climbing and descending. These can be individual obstacles that are very steep or they can be a trail that has a large change in elevation. A trail may only have climbs or descents, or it may have both. The scale is from 1 to 5, with 5 representing the highest amount of elevation changes or steep inclines. These numbers are represented with red Jeep icons.

Elevation: The amount of feet above sea level. These trails may start and end at a high elevation or they may also include a high number of Climbs & Descents as well. The scale is from 1 to 5, with 5 representing the highest elevation. These numbers are represented with red Jeep icons.

Scenery: The amount of scenic "photo ops." Admittedly, most trails are scenic -- this scale attempts to look at all trails here and rate them in comparison to each other. The scale is from 1 to 5, with 5 representing the highest amount of scenic areas. These numbers are represented with red Jeep icons.

Other Activities: The amount of other outdoor activities possible. Most trails will offer a large number of additional activities so this rating attempts to compare all trails to each other. Other Activities may include ATV riding, mountain biking, dirt biking, jogging, fishing, camping and rock climbing. The scale is from 1 to 5, with 5 representing the highest amount of other activities possible. These numbers are represented with red Jeep icons.
 

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Trail Rating Numbers

It's difficult to rate trails because it's subjective -- what you might think is a good trail for a stock Jeep Wrangler might not be what your neighbor thinks is acceptable. Still, ratings help you sort out what is a good trail for your vehicle and driving skill. They also help you know which trails to try when you're ready to step it up a notch or when you've bitten off more than you can chew.

With all that in mind, use the ratings as a guide and not as a true definition of the trail. Trail conditions can change many times over the years, and sometimes a rating is no longer accurate.


Rating of 1: almost any passenger car can complete this trail. However, we'd suggest cars with a bit more clearance than a sport coupe, and possibly one with All-Wheel Drive or 4-Wheel Drive. These trails are often easy dirt roads with little or no rocks in them. Passing is usually easy.

Rating of 2: almost any SUV can complete this trail. A passenger car might not do as well because of clearance issues or lack of All-Wheel Drive or 4-Wheel Drive. 2-Wheel Drive is usually fine for the entire trail, but mud or snow could make things more difficult. These trails are often dirt roads that may have rocks buried in them in places or cracks where the trail has eroded. Passing may be difficult and you may need to back up to a wide spot.

Rating of 3: almost any SUV with higher ground clearance can complete this trail. You probably won't need 4-Wheel Drive, but it would be good to have just in case. Because of rocks in the trail or whoopdeedoos in places, an SUV with lower clearance might have issues and might hit something on the undercarriage.

Rating of 4: a good challenge for a stock Jeep Wrangler. There will be smaller rocks and whoopdeedoos that might make 4-Wheel Drive necessary, so be sure you have it. There may be mud, hills or water that could pose additional challenges. These trails are probably the top end for standard SUVs.

Rating of 5: the highest challenge for a stock Jeep Wrangler without body damage, winching, or possible breakage. You may have to work on some of the bigger rocks and challenges, but you should make it through everything without too much trouble. You will need 4-Wheel Drive and you should not go alone.

Rating of 6: probably too much for a stock Jeep Wrangler, but perfect for one on 33" tires. These trails will provide challenges and fun for mildly modified vehicles as well as the bigger rigs, so they are perfect for mixed groups. There may be obstacles with many lines from easy to difficult.

Rating of 7: driver experience might make a big difference. Drivers new to wheeling a modified vehicle may want to learn on easier trails before moving up to ones with this rating. The obstacles may not be tougher if the right line is found, but a wrong line could be extremely difficult or dangerous. The possibility of rollovers and body damage is present, though almost all experienced drivers with modified vehicles should get through these trails without any issues.

Rating of 8: you may experience some body damage, and there is a high possibility of breakage. You may need to use a bit of momentum in an obstacle, and that often means a broken axle shaft or drive shaft. Experience will be helpful.

Rating of 9: you will probably get some body damage or breakage. At least one of the obstacles will push you against a rock or test your vehicle and your driving skills to the point that something will most likely give. Only the luckiest and most skilled drivers will make it through these trails in the same condition in which they started.

Rating of 10: an extreme trail for rock buggies only. Only the most modified vehicles will be able to complete these trails. Most vehicles will end up with some damage, and many will be too damaged to finish.
 

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Other activites in the area:

Lake City / Alpine Loop National Back Country Byway

38th Annual RockyGrass Festival in Telluride / July 23-25

The Narrow Gauge Circle



The Old Hundred Gold Mine is a gold mine in San Juan County, Colorado, United States. The mine is about five miles east of Silverton, Colorado, near the ghost town of Howardsville. The property is no longer mined, but is open for tours in the summer. High on the mountain above the main entrance is the former boarding house for the miners. The boardinghouse structure was stabilized against collapse by preservation efforts funded by the Colorado State Historical Fund.



Animas Forks Ghost Town

 

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I think we might make it again this year, but I need to wait and see how the job situation plays out. A couple more weeks they tell me...

Here is a group that has run all of these trails, rates them, and has pretty decent write-ups on each trail:
http://www.traildamage.com/
 

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Confirmed Members:

A49erFan - July 16th through 24th (departing on the 25th) / Space # ?
I just sent Jim and Amy an email reservation for the same dates, We might even get there a few days early like last year. I hope to have a new surprise this year.
 

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Did you put the Mustang on a Wrangler chassis?
That is an interesting idea, However I think that might slow it down in the quarter mile. I am having it redone with new paint, top and interior. That is not the surprise however. I might be pushing something new up to Silverton with the Commander.
 

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Just a reminder that the spots are only being held for two more days, Remember you can cancel up to two weeks before the event so I suggest you make your reservations A.S.A.P.
 

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Sites still available

I called made a reservation Sunday night for the full hook-up RV area. They said there are still spots open, and they are going to put other reservations away from our reserved block to try and hold as many open for us as they can until they run out of space for other unrelated people.

Plenty of space still available so come join.
 

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I called made a reservation Sunday night for the full hook-up RV area. They said there are still spots open, and they are going to put other reservations away from our reserved block to try and hold as many open for us as they can until they run out of space for other unrelated people.

Plenty of space still available so come join.
Great news, I sent you an e-mail but you are one step ahead of me.
 

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Updated - Reservation made for Friday and Saturday night, the 16th and 17th - my buddy is coming up with his family as well, has a JK, so don't give him too much crap :) Will we have Camp XK stickers again this year, I don't recall who made them last year...
 

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It is not looking like I will be able to make it this time. I really would like to but I have a lot going on.
I hope those that do go this year will have as much fun as last time.

Here is a re post of my 2009 video which will hopefully make some more people want to sign up and go. Compare to my normal day to day environment, it was an "out of this world" place to visit!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HmvRKsJJD7c
 
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