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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Most the 1.5" wheel spacers will suggest the use of locktite, however I just bought a pair that makes no mention of using it...and indicate to go by your vehicle manufacturers recommendations for torquing the lugs... but never exceed 130lbs.

It's kinda crazy, they suggest pulling the tires and rechecking the nuts every 10 miles... till they are no longer loose..talk about a little overkill.

I know if you use locktite, you generally reduce the torque by picking a value between around -25% and the dry torque spec, and then check them on a regular basis.

I know those with experience here will know a good torque setting to use, when applying RED locktite to the spacer lugs? I'm seeing everything from 80-90lbs online (even saw 100lbs) and although I would assume so...unsure if that's with locktite applied.

Funny...I saw a post elsewhere by some rocket scientist that claimed he put his on with an impact gun...so he figured that's probably 300-400 ft/lbs :banana:
 

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Torqueing down lug nuts with an air impact wrench as tight as you can possibly go, is likely to stretch and/or crack the studs, which after a few miles or anywhere to 10's of thousands of miles, of road use, the stud could pop right off. So that advice is actually accomplishing the opposite of what you would want.

In fact if you see a car with missing lug nuts/studs, I'll bet it was a lazy tire tech that used an air impact wrench to overtorque the lug nuts that was behind why they popped off.

When you put new parts together for the first time, exposed to the forces like a wheel/spacer/hub/new stud pressed in. There is settling, stretching, breaking in that can go on, that could result in the part moving closer together than when you initially tightened them down, if that happens, the torque on the nuts would decrease. In that case I can see recommended checking the torque on the lug nuts every 10 miles for a couple of times.

The rule is, do a check after a short amount of use, like 10 miles. Apply the spec torque with the torque wrench, if you hit the torque without the nut turning, then everything is settled into each other and its holding torque, if the nut turns before hitting the spec torque, that means the parts are still settling in and the nuts could continue to loosen, you have to repeat the process until the lug nut holds it spec torque without turning.

Its called a torque check.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I'm ok with the idea of a torque check but every 10 miles might be a little much for someone like me, who is doing it in the driveway with a pump jack and hand tools. If I had a lift and air tools to get it apart fast I guess it wouldn't be too bad.

Granted, you might only have to do it one or twice, and you want to ensure safety... but I was more inclined to do it like SAL had suggested at 100 miles. Or maybe split the difference and do it at 50 or so.

Its always annoyed me when I see a mechanic put lugs nuts back on with a impact gun. Some of those guys hold it so long that theres likely no way the average guy is even going to get the lugs off, when stranded with a flat, not to mention unequal tightening and stuff as they crank them on at a time.
 

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They make a Torque Stick, that goes between the air impact wrench and the socket, it pops at a set torque, and they are painted different colors for different torques. The idea is, you can you use an air impact wrench to tighten down lug nuts with the torque stick, once you hit the spec torque to lets go and lets the wrench spin without torqueing the lug nut greater. They look like an extension from a socket set, except painted a brite color. So if you see them using those torque stix, they are legit.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I can see if the mechanic uses a torque stick (like you described) to do the work, but I've yet to see it.

It's always something like a guy that just holds the trigger down till he thinks the lug nuts now good and tight. You know, like 300lbs or something. I have never seen a mechanic use a torque wrench for installing lugs, despite it being the correct method.
 
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