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Discussion Starter #1
Heres the deal.
Try yours out and let me know if its just mine please.

I started my car and removed the headlight plug. I measured the voltage and noted that when the car is on, at idle. And the headlight switch is OFF,

that the Jeep delivers about 11.92-12.0 volts to the switch/headlight plug.

This was noted as I installed HID lighting, and at daytime I noted there was a flicker (as the HID ballists only require 9-16 volts to start them).

I would think the HID ballists see the 11.92-12.0 volt current and are constantly lighting the hid ignitors, which light the HID bulbs, but the lights dont come on fully as the switch is off and requires 12.8 or above to keep the HID light on.

Just wondering if this is something Ill be able to resolve, a defective issue. If not them Ill just have to run the hids all the time and look good :) Or else Ill burn out the ignitors, over time which is not a goal.....

Of course mathmatically . if I drove 5 hours a day and used 5 hours of HID run time daily, and the lights are good for about 3000 hours, I wouldnt need new bulbs for 2 years :)
 

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Current and voltage would always be present I think. It's the enabling of the ground or return path that allows the voltage to be dropped onto the device.
 

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Mine is the same, I noticed this when hooking in the relay to my driving lights to the high beam circuit. High beams are getting voltage even when they are off.
-Hemi
 

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The circuit is ground switched, which is a common design on Asian and European (read German/DCX) vehicles. Since Chrysler builds so many vehicles for export and many of their designs are DCX in nature, then incorporating a globally accepted wiring standard only makes sense.

SD, most American made vehicles are designed with positive switched circuits, which is a design dating back to the early days of the automobile. Back then, the lighting switch acted as the relay and channeled all the current for the circuit, which is why they were very stout in design. When the compact relay was developed, the switch evolved into its current form, which is to channel a small amount of current to the relay which actually switches the circuit, making the entire circuit safer.

Neither system seems to outwiegh the other, just different designs. Just like Coke versus Pepsi, they both perform the same purpose.
 

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rwmorrisonjr said:
The circuit is ground switched, which is a common design on Asian and European (read German/DCX) vehicles. Since Chrysler builds so many vehicles for export and many of their designs are DCX in nature, then incorporating a globally accepted wiring standard only makes sense.

SD, most American made vehicles are designed with positive switched circuits, which is a design dating back to the early days of the automobile. Back then, the lighting switch acted as the relay and channeled all the current for the circuit, which is why they were very stout in design. When the compact relay was developed, the switch evolved into its current form, which is to channel a small amount of current to the relay which actually switches the circuit, making the entire circuit safer.

Neither system seems to outwiegh the other, just different designs. Just like Coke versus Pepsi, they both perform the same purpose.
RW, We are saying the same thing. I'm ex Navy myself and have been working in the electronic field for 25 years.
 
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