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Will 245/70/R17 tire fit in the spare tire space with the hitch? I'm debating on buying 245/70/R17 or 255/70/R17.
 

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I cant give you a definate answer since I'm not running that size tire but I do know that its only 1 inch larger then stock. With that being said I would almost bet that you can get it up there without any problems.
 

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Use the tire calculator in the tire size sticky to get a size comparison. Click Here
 

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When you have a set tire size like a 245/65R17 and go to the next size taller tire but with the same with ie. 245/70R17 you will gain exactly an inch. If you go up to a 245/75R17 from a stock tire size it will be two inches. If you have a tire that has a 1 inch smaller wheel ie. a 16 inch wheel, you will need to make up for that inch to have the same height as the tire with the 17 inch wheel. With that being said a 245/70R17 would be the exact same size (width/height) as a 245/75R16. The only difference would be the section height of the tire due to one wheel being an inch larger then the other.

So there is no need to go to a tire size calculator. The tire is the same width as stock and 1 inch taller. It should fit fine!
 

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I'd say the best way to tell is to get up underneath and see if you have at least a 1/2" of open space between the current tire and the hitch bolts. If you do, then it should fit.
 

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Any chance in hell a 245/75 would fit? +2"??
 

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Id say no to the 245/75.
 

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When you have a set tire size like a 245/65R17 and go to the next size taller tire but with the same with ie. 245/70R17 you will gain exactly an inch. If you go up to a 245/75R17 from a stock tire size it will be two inches. If you have a tire that has a 1 inch smaller wheel ie. a 16 inch wheel, you will need to make up for that inch to have the same height as the tire with the 17 inch wheel. With that being said a 245/70R17 would be the exact same size (width/height) as a 245/75R16. The only difference would be the section height of the tire due to one wheel being an inch larger then the other.

So there is no need to go to a tire size calculator. The tire is the same width as stock and 1 inch taller. It should fit fine!
Um, I'm missing something here,

Using the example of a 245/65R17, 245 is the section width expressed in millimeters.
65 is a percentage, I.E. the sidewall is 65% as tall as the tire is wide.
The R and 17 require no explanation.
The explanation you are providing.........I'm missing something

More definition and source?
Thanks,
.........Rob
 

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You are exactly correct about the 245 being how wide the tire is in milimeters and the 65 being the percentage of the width which makes up the height of the tire. All I was trying to say is that when you have a tire that is 245 mm wide with 65% of the width equaling the height on a 17 inch wheel you would have the exact same size tire as a 245 mm wide tire with 70% the width equaling the height on a 16 inch wheel. Since the 16 inch wheel is an inch smaller that same wheel makes up for the height by being 70% of the width.

Hahah hope you understand now. It might sound confusing but its really not. I know a lot about tires. My wife makes fun of me because I can see a mud tire or all terrain tire on a vehicle passing by and i can tell her exactly what tire it is. Its from plenty of hours researching about vehicles/parts.
 

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You are exactly correct about the 245 being how wide the tire is in milimeters and the 65 being the percentage of the width which makes up the height of the tire. All I was trying to say is that when you have a tire that is 245 mm wide with 65% of the width equaling the height on a 17 inch wheel you would have the exact same size tire as a 245 mm wide tire with 70% the width equaling the height on a 16 inch wheel. Since the 16 inch wheel is an inch smaller that same wheel makes up for the height by being 70% of the width.

Hahah hope you understand now. It might sound confusing but its really not. I know a lot about tires. My wife makes fun of me because I can see a mud tire or all terrain tire on a vehicle passing by and i can tell her exactly what tire it is. Its from plenty of hours researching about vehicles/parts.
OK, that works a bit better in my brain,
Thanks,
...Rob
 

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Um, I'm missing something here,

Using the example of a 245/65R17, 245 is the section width expressed in millimeters.
65 is a percentage, I.E. the sidewall is 65% as tall as the tire is wide.
The R and 17 require no explanation.
The explanation you are providing.........I'm missing something

More definition and source?
Thanks,
.........Rob
Yea what he said:ugh2:
 

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need some help if money were not an issue... Yeah sure

what reasonable lift would you have installed on a 2008 Jeep Commander, would like to accomodate larger tires than stock (for soft sand and still be road worthy limiting chassy roll) wide tires and get the diffs atleast another 2 inches of clearance if that is at all possible.
 

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what reasonable lift would you have installed on a 2008 Jeep Commander, would like to accomodate larger tires than stock (for soft sand and still be road worthy limiting chassy roll) wide tires and get the diffs atleast another 2 inches of clearance if that is at all possible.
Check out the Rocky Road lift, many of us have them and have had no trouble at the dealer.
 

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I just got some Michelin A/T tires put on today...size 245/70/17. They fit fine. Def a little tighter than stock though.
 

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You are exactly correct about the 245 being how wide the tire is in milimeters and the 65 being the percentage of the width which makes up the height of the tire. All I was trying to say is that when you have a tire that is 245 mm wide with 65% of the width equaling the height on a 17 inch wheel you would have the exact same size tire as a 245 mm wide tire with 70% the width equaling the height on a 16 inch wheel. Since the 16 inch wheel is an inch smaller that same wheel makes up for the height by being 70% of the width.

Hahah hope you understand now. It might sound confusing but its really not. I know a lot about tires. My wife makes fun of me because I can see a mud tire or all terrain tire on a vehicle passing by and i can tell her exactly what tire it is. Its from plenty of hours researching about vehicles/parts.
Hrm...exact same size? how "exact" are you trying to be here? In real world statistics with variations in rubber molds and tire wear, it's negligible, but technically you're going to be a little shorter going with a smaller wheel with just a 5% change in profile on a 245 series tire, and you'll be a little taller going with a taller wheel with the same comparison.

Why? Because profile is a percentage of tire width. If your tire isn't exactly 10" wide (a 245 is not, not quite), you're not going to get "exact" tire height matches. To get the closest accurate "plus sizing" you need a section width equal to 10 inches, and that's a 255 (25.4 millimeters per inch). But as stated, there are always variations. Some tires measure taller than others, exact same "size" and application, wheel, pressure, etc. So anything from 245 to 265 is going to be about the same. But if you start generalizing "going from a /65 to a /70 and dropping an inch in wheel diameter" you're going to have trouble when you're dealing with 235's, 285's, etc.

Just food for thought. I know this is an old post. I know I've done this before. I'm shopping for available tire sizes for my Commander and google search loves this forum. :alf:
 
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