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Just curious, is it just me or is the Jeep Commander susceptible to more windshield damage?
I've had three rock chips in about 1-1/2 year time frame. Same driving routes as I have taken with previous vehicles, and not a chip in any of those.
 

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I have 2 very minor ones in mine too. Don't know how it would be more likely to get damaged like this over any other vehicle. There is a cool looking low profile bug/rock guard that you can put on the edge of your hood to help deflect air up over a bit more...but take it off before you drive thru an automatic car wash (I learned that the hard way).
 

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Just curious, is it just me or is the Jeep Commander susceptible to more windshield damage?
I've had three rock chips in about 1-1/2 year time frame. Same driving routes as I have taken with previous vehicles, and not a chip in any of those.
It should be obvious that it is more susceptible to chips -- it is almost perpendicular. Almost no slant at all.

Here's a thread from back in "06: http://www.jeepcommander.com/forums/showthread.php?t=7209&highlight=windshield&page=19
 

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sometimes people see things as trends when really they are just coincidence...I'd need to see real scientific data to prove to me that a Commander is any more (or less) likely to be damaged by a rock going down the road...just saying it doesn't make something true. also...Jeep5352 the link you provide doesn't say anything but spammer! over and over???
 

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So, so, so many different variables that go into a rock hitting a windshield...I think its silly to think that one particular vehicle is more prone than any other due to glass angle. My Cherokee and my Commander have virtually the same angle, my Cherokee has 97K mi. on it with no chips from rocks, my Commander has 2 very small ones with 23K both from the guy who owned it on lease before I bought it...for all I know he had a bad habit of tailgating trucks....ha ha! here's a link I found: hope it posts right.

Strategy To Avoid Rock Chips [Archive] - Calguns.net
 

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I replaced my windshield after 1 WEEK (passing a truck, caught a rock). Was NOT happy to have to take my new to me Jeep in for a windshield replacement.
 

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I replaced my windshield after 1 WEEK (passing a truck, caught a rock). Was NOT happy to have to take my new to me Jeep in for a windshield replacement.
Yeah, that would have been disappointing...I think I don't catch many rocks, although I live in a rural area because I hang back from people on the road quite a way. I also may be kinda lucky because I've never had a punctured tire or a flat from the road either (knock on wood).
 

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I drive about 60,000 miles per year in my Altima, and I spend a lot of time on 255 in Illinois. Lots of Quary trucks, and have not replaced a windshield. Had the Jeep for 3 months, and it needs a new one. Vertical windshields are a rock magnet, instead of deflecting the glass takes the full force of the impact. At least that is my opinion.
 

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I drive about 60,000 miles per year in my Altima, and I spend a lot of time on 255 in Illinois. Lots of Quary trucks, and have not replaced a windshield. Had the Jeep for 3 months, and it needs a new one. Vertical windshields are a rock magnet, instead of deflecting the glass takes the full force of the impact. At least that is my opinion.
. Exactly.
 

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I drive, on average around 8K mi. a year. My luck just might be a function of not being on the road as much as some of you all. And I'm almost never on highways, which I'd imagine (at speeds of 65 or so) could easily magnify a small rock hit into a chip by sheer force. I'd love to see a true statistical break down from a reliable source on this issue, so many variables that are, and aren't in control of the driver. Statistics and data on windshield replacement would be flawed too though because of all the variables like speed, driving conditions, time spent on the road....all of which I suspect mean way more than the specific vehicle. To me, its like someone who owns a 2000 Honda Civic and says that they've been in 2 accidents in a year therefore a Honda seems to be more prone to be in an accident...all the other variables that exist, to me, are way more likely to have come into play than just the particular kind of car.
 

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. Exactly.
Subjective experience at best. Would love to see any member of the forum prove this with true scientific facts....that would be great.
 

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With a vertical windshield and a perpendicular rock strike, the windshield has to exert a force back against the rock equal to the force of the strike in order to stay intact.

With a sloped windshield, the strike is no longer perpindicular and some of that reactive force is friction as the rock travels across the windshield surface and is deflected off of the windshield. And given two identical thickness windshields, the one sloped has a greater effective thickness when struck head-on, making it stronger.
 

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but take it off before you drive thru an automatic car wash (I learned that the hard way).

why remove it from the car wash your talking about the chrome bug air deflector right?
No. I was talking about the plastic aftermarket bug deflectors Hummer recovery team...I lost mine on my Cherokee a few years ago because I forgot to take it off before rolling thru the car wash, the air blowers flexed it so violently that it shattered into 3 pieces...fubar. On the XJ they actually attach to the top row of the grill screws, on the Commander, the ones I've looked at just double density (3M) tape to the hood itself...since the one on my XJ didn't seem to reflect much in the way of bugs I'm not gonna put on my my XK because they really are more for looks than truly functional....although manufacturers claim the moon and sun it still seemed like I was getting just as many bugs striking my windshield as before I put one on then. Pretty doubtful they would reflect rock strikes either based on my observed lack of deflection of bugs which of course don't weigh near what a rock can. :)
 

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sometimes people see things as trends when really they are just coincidence...I'd need to see real scientific data to prove to me that a Commander is any more (or less) likely to be damaged by a rock going down the road...just saying it doesn't make something true. also...Jeep5352 the link you provide doesn't say anything but spammer! over and over???
Someone else already pointed out. It is the angle of the windshield that makes it more prone to chips, etc. The rocks will hit the windshield with more force (more square).
 

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Someone else already pointed out. It is the angle of the windshield that makes it more prone to chips, etc. The rocks will hit the windshield with more force (more square).
I guess you can believe that if you like...some of us need to see real proof. I don't buy it....and I laid out my reasoning why.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
With a vertical windshield and a perpendicular rock strike, the windshield has to exert a force back against the rock equal to the force of the strike in order to stay intact.

With a sloped windshield, the strike is no longer perpindicular and some of that reactive force is friction as the rock travels across the windshield surface and is deflected off of the windshield. And given two identical thickness windshields, the one sloped has a greater effective thickness when struck head-on, making it stronger.
From physics point of view, a vertical windshield would see more force from a strike. Force vector analyse of the strike would prove this to be true.
 

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It's called physics. More energy is transmitted to the glass because of the decreased angle (it is a more direct impact). The more a windshield us angled, the more the force is directed away from the impact point). Slide down a slide at a playground, and have someone hold a large piece of plywood at the end. Run into it at an almost perpendicular angle, and at a 45 degree angle. Which one hurts more?
 

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Keep in mind, the more sloped back the window is, the bigger it has to be to equal the same vertical height.

My little Neon R/T has a massive front windshield, plus being low to the ground, with a short slanted nose, that windshield is a massive rock catcher, I have chips and tiny cracks all over it.

Being swooped back more, and having to be larger to produce the same vertical height to view out of, means the windshield has less support from the frame. So advantages of a more glancing blow of most strikes, but by its nature it is also going to be weaker.

And one other unrelated consideration, the massive swooped back windshield, creates more reflections while looking through it. I have to keep my Neon R/T's windsheild very clean or I get also reflections of the huge dash or anything I put on the dash because of the steep angle of the glass and the angle you view through the glass as you drive.
 
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